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Praxis Cellars Lagrein (6)

Speed to First Woot:
12m 42.666s
First Sucker:
philsho
Last Wooter to Woot:
chuck2584
Last Purchase:
11 days ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 15% of Wine Woots
Bottom 43% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Bottom 31% of Wine Woots
Top 36% of all Woots

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Quantity Breakdown

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praxissusan


quality posts: 19 Private Messages praxissusan

Hi - we are happy to present our Lagrein on Woot. Please let me know if you have any questions - or notes on tasting. I am delighted the first Wooter went for a full case!

kylemittskus


quality posts: 257 Private Messages kylemittskus

This seems like a really nice offer. Good pH, lower alc...

20 months in wood is interesting. New/used/both?

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

praxissusan


quality posts: 19 Private Messages praxissusan
kylemittskus wrote:This seems like a really nice offer. Good pH, lower alc...

20 months in wood is interesting. New/used/both?

One third of the barrels are new; it's the same routine on all of our wines - makes it simple!

lseewoester


quality posts: 3 Private Messages lseewoester

Never heard of his varietal before but it sounds interesting. Any rats out there or anyone with a little more than what's in the description? Just wondering since it seems like such an obscure grape, and no blending either.

I cook with wine. Sometimes I even add it to the food.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 257 Private Messages kylemittskus
praxissusan wrote:One third of the barrels are new; it's the same routine on all of our wines - makes it simple!



You use the same oak regime for all of your bottles? Is your goal more of a house-style rather than an expression of varietal/terroir/vintage?

I would expect that different varieties/vintages could "handle" various oak influence so using a one-size-fits-all approach seems a bit odd, to be honest. But, I'm not ITB so maybe it's super common? Or there's rational behind it?

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

praxissusan


quality posts: 19 Private Messages praxissusan
kylemittskus wrote:You use the same oak regime for all of your bottles? Is your goal more of a house-style rather than an expression of varietal/terroir/vintage?

I would expect that different varieties/vintages could "handle" various oak influence so using a one-size-fits-all approach seems a bit odd, to be honest. But, I'm not ITB so maybe it's super common? Or there's rational behind it?

There are other factors that we vary between vintages & varietals. We use French oak on some of our wines and American oak on others. The time in barrel varies from just 7 months on our Pinot Noir to over 2 years for Cabernet. Bill feels the one third new, one third used once, and one third two year old barrels balances the flavor pick up from the oak with the development of varietal characteristics and aging characteristics.

praxissusan


quality posts: 19 Private Messages praxissusan
lseewoester wrote:Never heard of his varietal before but it sounds interesting. Any rats out there or anyone with a little more than what's in the description? Just wondering since it seems like such an obscure grape, and no blending either.

It is an obscure grape and very limited production in US or Italy. I find it it to be a full bodied wine; dry with layers of flavors including blue fruits and a little pomegranate. But I would love to hear from those who have tried ours or others.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 257 Private Messages kylemittskus
praxissusan wrote:There are other factors that we vary between vintages & varietals. We use French oak on some of our wines and American oak on others. The time in barrel varies from just 7 months on our Pinot Noir to over 2 years for Cabernet. Bill feels the one third new, one third used once, and one third two year old barrels balances the flavor pick up from the oak with the development of varietal characteristics and aging characteristics.



Makes perfect sense. The oak treatment varies, but the barrel selection is constant.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

cortot20


quality posts: 293 Private Messages cortot20
praxissusan wrote:It is an obscure grape and very limited production in US or Italy. I find it it to be a full bodied wine; dry with layers of flavors including blue fruits and a little pomegranate. But I would love to hear from those who have tried ours or others.



The only other winery I recall visiting that made one was Santa Barbara winery, and I enjoyed it quite a bit. I am tempted here but really need to not buy right now.

CT

kylemittskus


quality posts: 257 Private Messages kylemittskus

Of all the wineries to do so, Tobin James makes one.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

svwindom


quality posts: 16 Private Messages svwindom

Is this ready to drink or will it benefit from aging?

praxissusan


quality posts: 19 Private Messages praxissusan
svwindom wrote:Is this ready to drink or will it benefit from aging?

It is ready to go (we had a bottle last night), but will age for a few more years if you want.

CruelMelody


quality posts: 16 Private Messages CruelMelody

Is there a type of cuisine or a particular dish you would pair this wine with?

praxissusan


quality posts: 19 Private Messages praxissusan
CruelMelody wrote:Is there a type of cuisine or a particular dish you would pair this wine with?

I paired it with sausages the other night (wild boar from the vineyard!). I think any hearty vegetarian or meat pasta or a pot roast/stew works well. I also think it is lovely with the broadest range of game (lamb, venison, quail, duck all count for me); the blue fruits in the wine work well with those meats.

chipgreen


quality posts: 285 Private Messages chipgreen

I previously purchased a mixed offering from Praxis in 2011 and a 2007 Lagrein was included. I didn't drink it until 2014. Here are my notes;

"Dark, inky purple color. End of cork saturated and coated with sediment. Nose of cherry, cedar and a little funk. Plum, sour cherry, blueberry and a slight vegetal note on the palate. Juicy mouthfeel with coarse tannins on the medium finish. Used a filtered pour spout due to sediment in bottle. I wouldn't seek this out but if it was in front of me, I might buy it again."

I was glad to get the opportunity to try a Lagrein but since Praxis no longer ships to Ohio I won't be going in on this offer. I probably wouldn't want the whole 6-pack anyway....

CruelMelody


quality posts: 16 Private Messages CruelMelody
praxissusan wrote:I paired it with sausages the other night (wild boar from the vineyard!). I think any hearty vegetarian or meat pasta or a pot roast/stew works well. I also think it is lovely with the broadest range of game (lamb, venison, quail, duck all count for me); the blue fruits in the wine work well with those meats.



That makes this very tempting! I have been working on a dish of braised short ribs served over goat cheese polenta, and sounds like this would be a great pairing

praxissusan


quality posts: 19 Private Messages praxissusan
CruelMelody wrote:That makes this very tempting! I have been working on a dish of braised short ribs served over goat cheese polenta, and sounds like this would be a great pairing

YUM!

svwindom


quality posts: 16 Private Messages svwindom
praxissusan wrote:I paired it with sausages the other night (wild boar from the vineyard!). I think any hearty vegetarian or meat pasta or a pot roast/stew works well. I also think it is lovely with the broadest range of game (lamb, venison, quail, duck all count for me); the blue fruits in the wine work well with those meats.



This also makes it sound attractive to me, as my husband is a hunter and elk forms the basis of most of our meals. I've enjoyed the other Praxis offers I've bought, so I guess it's time to hit the button!

LoonBoarder


quality posts: 9 Private Messages LoonBoarder
cortot20 wrote:The only other winery I recall visiting that made one was Santa Barbara winery, and I enjoyed it quite a bit. I am tempted here but really need to not buy right now.



Stuart Cellars in Temecula made a Lagrein, but I'm not sure whether the new owner (the winery is now called Bel Vino) has made any of late. I'll check next time I visit the tasting room! [Edit: according to their web site, there's no Lagrein to be had...]

Dude... wait, what?