WootBot


quality posts: 16 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: Read any good books lately?
  • 45.7% - Yes- and I will tell you about them in the comments! 127
  • 54.3% - No- but I will read the comments for suggestions! 151
278 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

ardubu


quality posts: 9 Private Messages ardubu

"An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth", by Col. Chris Hadfield.

Ah, the hell with it.

Marcusx70


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Marcusx70

I just finished reading a book called "Red Summer" It is about the explosive summer of 1919. It is not a an easy read and it will have you rethinking a lot of current events. However, it was a good book if you are into any kind of American history.

woodcall


quality posts: 0 Private Messages woodcall

Almost anything by Elmore Leonard. He was a genius.

xandersherry


quality posts: 0 Private Messages xandersherry

The best book I've recently read is "The Worst Hard Time" a fairly well known book about the dust bowl. I found it a fascinating in-depth account of period I previously only knew superficially.

snavagauster


quality posts: 0 Private Messages snavagauster

Going Rogue: A Swords, Spells, & Stealth Novel

Benblaze


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Benblaze

The Bible.. The only good book there is.

robfly3


quality posts: 0 Private Messages robfly3
Benblaze wrote:The Bible.. The only good book there is.



Ditto!

moles1138


quality posts: 46 Private Messages moles1138
Benblaze wrote:The Bible.. The only good book there is.



Meh.

michaelvella


quality posts: 20 Private Messages michaelvella
woodcall wrote:Almost anything by Elmore Leonard. He was a genius.



Indeed.
That is my preferred genre - mystery fiction and the like.
Finished the latest Michael Connelly book a while back, and it was great, as always.
The Jaguar by T. Jefferson Parker was good, though I liked others by him better.

hellraiser


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hellraiser

I'm re-reading the Time Travel Dinosaur while reading Mark's first book Zombocalypse Now.

http://www.youngmark.com/product/time-travel-dinosaur/

RocRizzo


quality posts: 2 Private Messages RocRizzo

"The Best Government Money Can Buy" by Greg Palast.
Explains how and who stole the election, and how to stop it.

"Understanding is a three-edged sword."

myimzadi


quality posts: 1 Private Messages myimzadi

I was hoping for more suggestions.
I usually read a book in a couple days and go through them.faurly quickly but have no preference for author...I like new suggestions

avsfan80526


quality posts: 1 Private Messages avsfan80526
xandersherry wrote:The best book I've recently read is "The Worst Hard Time" a fairly well known book about the dust bowl. I found it a fascinating in-depth account of period I previously only knew superficially.




I read this recently too, and agree with your assessment.

TaylorSwiftsHaircut


quality posts: 31 Private Messages TaylorSwiftsHaircut

Staff

myimzadi wrote:I was hoping for more suggestions.
I usually read a book in a couple days and go through them.faurly quickly but have no preference for author...I like new suggestions



I've been reading "No Angel" by Penny Vincenzi. It's very long, and very well written. If you go through books quickly, I recommend taking this one for a spin. It's got enough to really sink your teeth into.

Also, follow up question, what's your daily schedule like? Where do you find time to read so much?

maxikyd


quality posts: 7 Private Messages maxikyd

Finished re-reading "Frankenstein" by Mary Shelley. If you haven't, you should. The language is a bit old-fashioned, but it is SO much more than a "monster" story. It deals with acceptance/rejection of those we classify as "other", familial obligations, scientific and medical ethics, really taking responsibility for one's actions.

lacotomo


quality posts: 12 Private Messages lacotomo

Just finished the series for The Expanse. The TV show on Sci-Fi is decent, but the books are a great read. I love the political overtones, racial lines, and of course alien lifeforms, spaceships, and space battles!

ducktorwho


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ducktorwho

These are not all recently read, but it's hard not to share your favorite authors.

I read a lot of Regency novels (not the bodice ripper type, the ones similar to Jane Austen). Georgette Heyer is one of my favorite authors. I own all but one of her books (Penhallow is the worst book I've ever read, but apparently she did that on purpose to stick it to her publisher). Her books are really well written and witty. I laugh out loud frequently.

I recently found Sylvia Thorpe (can borrow some of her books for free from openlibrary.org). Some of her novels are Regency, but seem to include peril and adventure. The two I've read:
Strangers on the Moor (more Gothic than Regency)
The House at Bell Orchard

I also like Kate Morton's books (except for The Distant Hours). Her novels switch back and forth between the past and present day. They're not regency though.

Susanna Kearsley also alternates between past and present in her books, some contain time travel, but I wouldn't consider them scifi. Of hers, I like The Winter Sea, The Rose Garden, and A Desperate Fortune.

I also really enjoy Helen MacInnes' books. She wrote spy/thriller novels in the 40s-60s.

MikeGale


quality posts: 0 Private Messages MikeGale
moles1138 wrote:Meh.



Ya, I think it is in the mythology and fantasy section.

runner188


quality posts: 0 Private Messages runner188

"The Mabinogion," a collection of Middle Welsh folklore, "Pitch Woman and Other Stories" a collection of Northwest native American tales as told by Coquelle Thompson (my great great grandfather). I'm kind of a folklore junky.

luchmine1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages luchmine1

It's hard to go wrong with anything Neil Gaiman.

randysanders


quality posts: 8 Private Messages randysanders

Re-reading Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance.

plrfarmgirl


quality posts: 0 Private Messages plrfarmgirl

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. A life of searching, growing and learning. Easy read, translated into many languages.

maxikyd


quality posts: 7 Private Messages maxikyd

You might enjoy Ridiculous by D.L. Carter. I laughed until I had tears running down my face. It's available on Amazon Kindle for 1.99.

I read a lot of Regency novels (not the bodice ripper type, the ones similar to Jane Austen). ...well written and witty. I laugh out loud frequently.

maxikyd


quality posts: 7 Private Messages maxikyd
randysanders wrote:Re-reading Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance.



I just recommended that to one of my HS students. Would you classify it as philosophy, non-fiction, or just darn good?

edlada


quality posts: 8 Private Messages edlada
maxikyd wrote:I just recommended that to one of my HS students. Would you classify it as philosophy, non-fiction, or just darn good?



I would say it is just darn good, philosophical, non-fiction. Read it!

My dogs like me, that is important.

chipgreen


quality posts: 286 Private Messages chipgreen
randysanders wrote:Re-reading Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance.

That is some high quality reading right there!

hayleydeadrea


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hayleydeadrea

The Dark Tower series by Stephen King. Get to it.

bahwm


quality posts: 58 Private Messages bahwm

The Lei Crime Series (12 in all) by Toby Neal. For those interested in things a little computer techie, read her Wired Series. All are fast-paced, good reads available for ereaders and in paperback. The covers are beautifully photographed!

May our love be like good wine, grow stronger as it grows older. ~ Old English Toast

coynedj


quality posts: 11 Private Messages coynedj

Man Tiger, by Eka Kurniawan, was an excellent recent read. He's written another book (Beauty is a Wound) which I have heard is very similar to Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude, and I did love the Marquez book.

I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff. Bob Dylan, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues

How on earth did I get 11 QPs?

randysanders


quality posts: 8 Private Messages randysanders
maxikyd wrote:I just recommended that to one of my HS students. Would you classify it as philosophy, non-fiction, or just darn good?



Definitely Philosophy.
A hard read in some places,
but worth it.

PocketBrain


quality posts: 61 Private Messages PocketBrain

Zealot's Folly

Thanks to up-to-the-minute tracking, I don't track my package so much as stalk it.

threemoons


quality posts: 22 Private Messages threemoons

"American Gods" by Neil Gaiman. Just also finished "How to be a Person in the World==Ask Polly's Guilde."

Both good reads.

I got me one!

cliffleanne


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cliffleanne

All of the above I say..., but I have really read some good books lately. My favorite of my last few is called, "A Baxter Christmas" by Karen Kingsbury. It was really good, and it's available on Kindle, Nook, etc. Read it! It was great!

kcphil


quality posts: 1 Private Messages kcphil

Depending on what you enjoy, my suggestions from what I've enjoyed in more recent times are;

The Dexter series (books that inspired the tv show)

All of Chris Jericho's books (they're a great read if you're a WWE / Wrestling fan)

The Chronicles of Egg series (fantasy world w/ pirates, magic spells, coming-of-age story. Plus the author, Geoff Rodkey, is an Emmy-nominated writer of Bevis & Butthead, Daddy Day Car, RV, and the Disney Channel’s Good Luck Charlie)

and finally "Dad, Dames, Demons, and a Dwarf" from Mancow