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quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

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Diamond Ridge Vineyards Petite Sirah (4)

Speed to First Woot:
5m 24.117s
First Sucker:
anncnoble
Last Wooter to Woot:
rfarq52
Last Purchase:
4 months ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 43% of Wine Woots
Top 26% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 38% of Wine Woots
Top 20% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 7% first woot
  • 1% second woot
  • 10% < 10 woots
  • 20% < 25 woots
  • 61% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 5% joined today
  • 1% one week old
  • 0% one month old
  • 9% one year old
  • 85% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 85% bought 1
  • 10% bought 2
  • 5% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

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4%
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Quality Posts


Cesare


quality posts: 1698 Private Messages Cesare

Diamond Ridge Vineyards Petite Sirah 4-Pack
$59.99 $116.00 48% off List Price
2010 Petite Sirah, Lake County
CT link above

Winery website

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

jcassens5


quality posts: 13 Private Messages jcassens5

I don't have my notes in front of me... but I can tell you that this is a great, bold Petite Sirah. It takes a LONG time to open up and has a pretty large amount of sediment, but just use a filter screen and decant an hour or two (or more) and you will be happy you did.

Oh yeah and this is Clark Smith territory... need I say more? He's made quite the impression

winesmith


quality posts: 49 Private Messages winesmith

Hi gang!

Diamond Ridge is one of the most fascinating vineyards in California. It’s essentially a mountain vineyard with a lake effect by virtue of its proximity to Clear Lake.

The altitude is important for Petite Sirah because it rots easily, and produces its best fruit when there’s a lot of UV, so the fog-free conditions and thin air at 2200 feet assure sound fruit. This was particularly benficial in 2010, a rainy year when a lot of PS in the downstream vineyards was prone to spoilage.

Another bonus is that the UV brings out AMAZING purple color. This is critical to texture. Like most PS, this one has tons of tannin. But the high color makes the tannin very fine, because the anthocyanins cannot daisy-chain the way tannins do, and thus act as bookends on polymerization, so the resulting chains are short and fine. I use heavy micro-oxygenation on this wine immediately after fermentation to stabilize the color and promote a plush, almost oily, quite feminine tannin structure.

The problem with high UV is that all that sunlight, while stimulating aromatic development, can also bake off aromas. Not here, though. We put on our sweaters every afternoon around 3PM and the aromatics are very well retained in the fruit. As a result, this wine is overflowing with blueberry and lavender aromas.

Finally, the volcanic decomposed granite soil imparts a palate energy I call minerality. Besides adding interest to the flavors, this trait seems to be associated with great longevity. The wine is indeed a little closed right now, but that’s because it’s on an incredibly long trajectory.

What you've got here is a big back-rub of a wine - something satisfying to sit and enjoy on a Friday evening after a hard week, a wine that will love you back. This is one of those rare examples of something that drinks very well now, but also will age well for decades. At $15 a bottle, I recommend you buy multiple packs. We only have 130 four packs left, and we plan to sell out today.

winesmith


quality posts: 49 Private Messages winesmith

Maybe I’ll share my thoughts on Petite Sirah in general. I love it so much more than its parent Syrah, which in many cases I find lacks focus. I judge for a lot of wine competitions, and the PS category is often 50% Gold Medals, while the Syrahs garner 5-10%.

The problem is that while Syrah is usually loaded with intriguing tertiary aromas like leather, mustard, black pepper and grilled beef fat, it commonly lacks a core of fruit. It often reminds me of The Player, a movie with cameos by every Hollywood star, but no plot.

The other parent of PS is Peloursin, an Alpine variety from which it gets its hand grenade-like tight cluster and tendency to rot. Peloursin is an intensely fruity grape, full of grapefruit and pomegranate aromas. This parentage assures that PS always has a charming core of dense fruitiness, around which the complexing elements of Syrah can add interest rather than confusion.

The grape is known in France as Durif, after the grape breeder who introduced it to the Rhone in 1880. It isn’t considered a noble variety in France, which is far to damp for it so that it tends to infect fermentations with sour rot. Where it really shines is California, where our dry conditions are perfectly suited for it.

Petite Sirahs are always loaded with tannin, and when we made them as modern wines, they were clumsy and aggressive. In the last ten years, though, many winemakers have mastered the art of tannin management, and the wines have become magnificent.

For more about Petite Sirah, check out my two articles at AppellationAmerica.com:

PS, How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways
and Sources of Petite Sirah’s Regional Diversity.

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 187 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
winesmith wrote:Hi gang!

Diamond Ridge is one of the most fascinating vineyards in California. It’s essentially a mountain vineyard with a lake effect by virtue of its proximity to Clear Lake.

The altitude is important for Petite Sirah because it rots easily, and produces its best fruit when there’s a lot of UV, so the fog-free conditions and thin air at 2200 feet assure sound fruit. This was particularly benficial in 2010, a rainy year when a lot of PS in the downstream vineyards was prone to spoilage.

Another bonus is that the UV brings out AMAZING purple color. This is critical to texture. Like most PS, this one has tons of tannin. But the high color makes the tannin very fine, because the anthocyanins cannot daisy-chain the way tannins do, and thus act as bookends on polymerization, so the resulting chains are short and fine. I use heavy micro-oxygenation on this wine immediately after fermentation to stabilize the color and promote a plush, almost oily, quite feminine tannin structure.

The problem with high UV is that all that sunlight, while stimulating aromatic development, can also bake off aromas. Not here, though. We put on our sweaters every afternoon around 3PM and the aromatics are very well retained in the fruit. As a result, this wine is overflowing with blueberry and lavender aromas.

Finally, the volcanic decomposed granite soil imparts a palate energy I call minerality. Besides adding interest to the flavors, this trait seems to be associated with great longevity. The wine is indeed a little closed right now, but that’s because it’s on an incredibly long trajectory.

What you've got here is a big back-rub of a wine - something satisfying to sit and enjoy on a Friday evening after a hard week, a wine that will love you back. This is one of those rare examples of something that drinks very well now, but also will age well for decades. At $15 a bottle, I recommend you buy multiple packs. We only have 130 four packs left, and we plan to sell out today.



Thanks!

What do you consider the drinking windows on these? Kent Rasmussen indicates PS goes through a dumb (muted) phase starting around 10 to 15 years and lasting 5 to 10 years (he got a chance to taste a lot of old PS).


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

winesmith


quality posts: 49 Private Messages winesmith
MarkDaSpark wrote:Thanks!

What do you consider the drinking windows on these? Kent Rasmussen indicates PS goes through a dumb (muted) phase starting around 10 to 15 years and lasting 5 to 10 years (he got a chance to taste a lot of old PS).



Excellent question. Wish my answer were as good! PS ages amazingly well. I recently had an '87 Parducci that was just coming into its own. And that was not a big wine.

I have measured the oxygen appetite (the rate of drop dissolved O2 as it is consumed by the wine) for hundreds of wines. They range from around 0.01 ppm per day for a light Sauvignon Blanc to about 8 ppm/day for a big Cabernet. This wine is on the high side, with 14 ppm/day. That means at this stage in its life, it needs to breathe. Yet it has so much fruit, and the tannins are so refined, that it is plenty enjoyable right now.

On the other hand, if you are looking for aged complexities, you are going to have to wait awhile. I wouldn't look for any serious bottle bouquet until at least 2020 and probably later.

Still, with this wine, I think it has the core integrity to sail through those teenage years and always be enjoyable. It can be frustrating, though, to watch a wine outlive you. I guess we should have taken better care of ourselves, huh?


macbeth1214


quality posts: 0 Private Messages macbeth1214

I am concerned about ordering wine in this heat. What specifically is being done to protect it during shipping in these conditions, and is it automatic?

winesmith


quality posts: 49 Private Messages winesmith
macbeth1214 wrote:I am concerned about ordering wine in this heat. What specifically is being done to protect it during shipping in these conditions, and is it automatic?


I've heard this asked before, and satisfactorily answered, but it's not my area of expertise to respond more definitively. Any wooters out there who are more familiar with summertime procedures?

keithnowak7


quality posts: 11 Private Messages keithnowak7
winesmith wrote:Any wooters out there who are more familiar with summertime procedures?



It supposedly is shipped in a climate controlled truck to a distribution hub nearby. I don't know what happens from there on, but they won't ship it out, even if the Styrofoam, if it is ridiculously hot outside.

I've never received a bad bottle of wine (meaning damaged by shipping/heat) from woot. Furthermore, I have enjoyed Clark's wines, and am still very appreciative of the signed bottles of Chardonnay/Chablis.

woottoady


quality posts: 34 Private Messages woottoady
macbeth1214 wrote:I am concerned about ordering wine in this heat. What specifically is being done to protect it during shipping in these conditions, and is it automatic?

Received 2 cases of "reds" this week. Bottles were encased in styrofoam. They were neither chilled, nor warm, but pretty much at my house temperature. OK by me.

I almost ordered this ps, except after reading about the drinking window, it seemed that their shelf life is longer than mine. Drats!

randysanders


quality posts: 5 Private Messages randysanders

I got an email from Clark yesterday...so I was
anticipating this opportunity. I'm not clear
how Clark is related to this wine, but any wine
he suggests is good enough for me. In for 1.
I opened up a random 2006 PS last night, and
it was incredibly tannic, and is much better
today. Since I drink mostly red wine, and eat
mostly dark chocolate, I'm sure that I will still
be around to drink this PS.

Oh, and I've been buying, but delaying shipment
until Sept. 29 to avoid heat, however, the
caterpillars and squirrels are telling us that
it's going to snow in Septmber this year!

winesmith


quality posts: 49 Private Messages winesmith
woottoady wrote:Received 2 cases of "reds" this week. Bottles were encased in styrofoam. They were neither chilled, nor warm, but pretty much at my house temperature. OK by me.

I almost ordered this ps, except after reading about the drinking window, it seemed that their shelf life is longer than mine. Drats!



I guess I didn't express myself properly re drinking window. I think this stuff is drinking wonderfully right now, albeit I recommend breathing and even a good shake. I was trying to argue that although it will last a long time, I don't anticipate this particular wine falling into the "Valley of the Shadow of Death that some PSs experience when they've lost their youthful fruit and have yet to acquire the charms of age.

winesmith


quality posts: 49 Private Messages winesmith
randysanders wrote:I got an email from Clark yesterday...so I was
anticipating this opportunity. I'm not clear
how Clark is related to this wine, but any wine
he suggests is good enough for me. In for 1.
I opened up a random 2006 PS last night, and
it was incredibly tannic, and is much better
today. Since I drink mostly red wine, and eat
mostly dark chocolate, I'm sure that I will still
be around to drink this PS.

Oh, and I've been buying, but delaying shipment
until Sept. 29 to avoid heat, however, the
caterpillars and squirrels are telling us that
it's going to snow in September this year!



Besides my own WineSmith wines, I make all the Diamond Ridge Vineyards wines as well as some other labels.

gmcdonne16


quality posts: 0 Private Messages gmcdonne16

No wine.woot shipping to Georgia. Can you ship direct from the winery? If so, is there a good way to reach you to set it up?

winesmith


quality posts: 49 Private Messages winesmith
gmcdonne16 wrote:No wine.woot shipping to Georgia. Can you ship direct from the winery? If so, is there a good way to reach you to set it up?



Give Dan a call at 707-480-4771. We'll see what we can do.

Clark