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quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

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Wedderspoon Gold Raw Chilean Honey (4)

Speed to First Woot:
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Last Wooter to Woot:
ash385
Last Purchase:
3 months ago
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  • 90% bought 1
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Quality Posts


Cesare


quality posts: 1565 Private Messages Cesare

Wedderspoon Gold Raw Chilean Honey 4-Pack
$39.99 $67.96 41% off List Price
(2) Wedderspoon Gold Raw Tiaca Honey, 8.8 oz
(2) Wedderspoon Gold Raw Ulmo Honey, 8.8 oz

Website

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

wolfean


quality posts: 5 Private Messages wolfean

It's getting a little hot, 90+ degrees, I'm assuming this is not good for honey?!?

Swordman


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Swordman
wolfean wrote:It's getting a little hot, 90+ degrees, I'm assuming this is not good for honey?!?



Won't hurt it in the slightest. Honey is self-preserving. They found some in an Egyptian tomb, over 2000 years old, crystalized, but still very edible. Honey is incredible stuff.

eugene22n


quality posts: 0 Private Messages eugene22n

Organic or nah? The only reference is in the company name.

I'm tempted since I do like honey and am running out at the moment but I'm aware of a lot of fakery when it comes to high end honey.

Any advise from people who know more about this or from the company would be appreciated.

arosborn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages arosborn

If anyone cares, the "tiaca" appears to be Caldcluvia paniculata, and the "ulmo" is Eucryphia cordifolia. Wikipedia has articles on both, but there's really not a lot of information (interestingly, it seems the ulmo is considered somewhat endangered in its natural habitat.)

suteishichic


quality posts: 21 Private Messages suteishichic

OH MY ██████ ███! Wow! I almost woke my toddler up when I saw this!

So if you're into tea and/or honey like I am? You're in for a true treat. I wait all YEAR for ulmo honey to come out from Chile and then I try to horde it! And this? First I've seen so far. Not on amazon yet! Not in whole foods. Or specialty stores. I'd think this was last year's dregs if I didn't believe after scowering everywhere online that last year's was sold out early and fast!

So yeah, I made an involuntary joyful noise. It's pretty hard to find and once it's gone? You have to wait for it -- and I do! I've been out for months!

Taste-wise ulmo is my favorite here. One of my all-time loves. To describe? That is hard because it's so very light and floral. Like no other honey you've had. It's similar in sweetness to a white Himalayan but has a definitive and unique floral taste. Not cloyingly flowered, but delicate and perfume-y. Holds up well to even a light black tea and takes milk well without overpowering all the flavors (tea and milk).

Now healing-wise? Properties are similar to mankua but without the strong tea-tree medicinal taste (which I also like but it's like champagne (ulmo taste) to a strong bock beer (mankua)). Ulmo is still powerful even with it's delicious sweet, light taste, it still can knock out a virus fast. Even my skeptical husband was impressed by taste and power -- he owns a toystore in Chicago. It's what he brings to work to keep from getting sick when EVERYONE else and their kid.

Price? In season I've bought one small jar at whole foods for 8.99, towards the end of the season I've paid 12.99 plus shipping which can be high. The husband let me because we were out and he "needed" it, but then it was gone. And you wait until NOW!

Now the Tiaca has a completely different taste and texture. It feels more dense and buttery on the tongue, feel is more like tupelo but without tupelo's distinctive pine taste. It's stronger-tasting than ulmo, will take over a light tea, and if they made vanilla licorice, this is how I'd imagine it tasting. It is not as medicinal tasting as mankua and I never noticed any immune boost or cold fighting benefits as I do from ulmo and mankua. It is a pleasant honey and I like it in herbal teas or tisane drinks that on their own might not taste very nice (I'm looking at you valerian and skullcap). It's lovely with camomile.

So no, up north it's not "honey" season, but these are out only once a year and there's not tons of either of them produced. It's well worth grabbing and storing although mine never last. I'm always out and waiting for the next year's harvest. I've bought this for $8.99 and once for $6.99 but I usually only buy this because I'm craving ulmo and nothing is like it.

Hope that helps describe. Off to buy! Thanks, woot!

suteishichic


quality posts: 21 Private Messages suteishichic

And some health studies on Ulmo in case anyone else is a google wannabe-doctor/health geek like I am (can't make links easily on my phone one handed while holding my sleeping toddler, sorry. If I let her go, she'll wake up and want her 438th glass of water tonight -_-):

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/10/47

FlamingoNut


quality posts: 12 Private Messages FlamingoNut

I'd rather continue to support my local beekeepers. Pass.

rycol


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rycol
eugene22n wrote:Organic or nah? The only reference is in the company name.

I'm tempted since I do like honey and am running out at the moment but I'm aware of a lot of fakery when it comes to high end honey.

Any advise from people who know more about this or from the company would be appreciated.



Not organic - according to:
http://www.wedderspoon.com/shop/Wedderspoon-Gold-Ulmo-Honey.html
and
http://www.wedderspoon.com/shop/Wedderspoon-Gold-Tiaca-Honey.html

andia007


quality posts: 0 Private Messages andia007

Didn't see this on the packaging, but remember that honey is not safe for babies. Children under the age of one are at risk of intestinal botulism because of spores common in all honey.

CrystalSinger


quality posts: 7 Private Messages CrystalSinger

While I would love to always support my local beekeepers, many of them are not in production here yet - spring has been very cool, so things are taking a while to flower. Also, I use enough honey throughout the year that I can buy this and still by local once new raw honey gets to the shelves. I think I am in for at least one.

T

Dadoboy


quality posts: 8 Private Messages Dadoboy
Swordman wrote:Won't hurt it in the slightest. Honey is self-preserving. They found some in an Egyptian tomb, over 2000 years old, crystalized, but still very edible. Honey is incredible stuff.



Who in the hell would eat 2000 year old honey to see if it was edible?!??!

rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
suteishichic wrote:OH MY ██████ ███! Wow! I almost woke my toddler up when I saw this!
Price? In season I've bought one small jar at whole foods for 8.99, towards the end of the season I've paid 12.99 plus shipping which can be high.

Hope that helps describe. Off to buy! Thanks, woot!

...and were those purchases for ~9oz jars?

CT

WLAURENT


quality posts: 7 Private Messages WLAURENT

This is very tasty honey, but as mentioned earlier, I prefer to support the local producers.

Aside from keeping the money in the community and supporting a local business, there is another benefit of local honey - if you are prone to allergies the local honey, having a lot of the sniffling/eye watering causing pollen in it, helps build up your body's natural immunity. Same goes with locally sourced bee pollen.

tytiger58


quality posts: 74 Private Messages tytiger58

That shill suteishichic convinced me..I think I have to try this

Plus I don't think we have any local bee keepers in the big city?

Last wooter to woot:tytiger58

What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch? ~ W. C. Fields

“Freedom is something that dies unless it's used” Hunter S Thompson




SmilingBoognish


quality posts: 46 Private Messages SmilingBoognish

Very interesting info in this thread, particularly from suteishichic. But I am fortunate enough to have a friend in Bodega Bay who gives me locally gathered honey in such bounty that I give away a fair amount more than I can personally use. Tastes good, but I'm no honey connoisseur. It could be the equivalent of mass marketed grocery store wine and I probably wouldn't know!

snowkitten


quality posts: 1 Private Messages snowkitten

Thank you suteishichic for the great run down of these honeys! I was waffling a bit on whether or not to try them, and you have definitely swayed me towards them.

And to those saying they'll only support their local bee keepers, I don't understand the rationale. You can't have both? Honey from different regions tastes different and by all means support your local guys, but nothing wrong with having different types of honey on hand. Honey doesn't go bad.

Swordman


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Swordman
Dadoboy wrote:Who in the hell would eat 2000 year old honey to see if it was edible?!??!



I would, for one. I should have clarified:

They knew of honey's properties long before the discovery of it in the tomb. So, they'd already have known if it was honey, it was probably edible.

LM1968


quality posts: 2 Private Messages LM1968
eugene22n wrote:Organic or nah? The only reference is in the company name.

I'm tempted since I do like honey and am running out at the moment but I'm aware of a lot of fakery when it comes to high end honey.

Any advise from people who know more about this or from the company would be appreciated.



Hi, the Chilean honeys are tested in the same way we test our Organic honeys, the only difference is the farm in Chile is not certified Organic, although all the same important aspects are followed. This honey is NON-GMO, antibiotic free, never any additives if any kind, no manipulation. Very clean, very pure.

daveinwarshington


quality posts: 15 Private Messages daveinwarshington

WOW ... Expensive honey

I buy from a local beekeeper, by the quart jar. It's raw, just strained through a filter to get the stingers out.
There's usually 5 or 6 flavors, depending on the location of the hive.
$10 a qt. It's really good!

suteishichic


quality posts: 21 Private Messages suteishichic

Yeah, I'd probably try 2000 year old honey if I had the chance. Hopefully it would better than the old expensive egg someone made me once try. *shudder*

A shill? Really? I'm a sahm to a 3 yo and a border collie and my husband owns a collectible toystore in Chicago that starts with a Q. Call him and ask. Please. I wanna hear him laugh all the way down the street.

I'm sure this is not organic, but I'm questioning if the organic labels can even be trusted. See the reports on how little honey is actually in many honeys? Even organic ones? Wedderspoon was recently called out for their mankua having under testing very little mankua in it.

The size I previously bought was the same exact one and the bottle shapes exactly as unique although a different label. I guessed since there is so little of this that they are all processed in the same place/same source and labeled by the buyer?

And I do support the local beekeepers around Chicago as well (there's even a honey co-op here!) but honey varies by region and there are some real treasures to try both in flavor and properties. White honey, tupelo, orange blossom, real mankua, ulmo, sourwood, sidr, to name just a few and I find it's a great way to learn about an area actually.

The compounder pharmacy I use interestingly is also a passionate beekeeper (they're in Aurora). Their honey REALLY helps during allergy season but is not great-tasting. I'm not a big dogwood fan and it kinda tastes like ithat smells with a bit of goldenrod? Earthy and mediciny with old lady perfume mixed in. I take a spoonful when my allergies have me stuffed up. Works great!

xrobevansx


quality posts: 1 Private Messages xrobevansx

Start your own hive.

http://www.EvansCedarBeehives.com

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus
suteishichic wrote:Yeah, I'd probably try 2000 year old honey if I had the chance. Hopefully it would better than the old expensive egg someone made me once try. *shudder*

A shill? Really? I'm a sahm to a 3 yo and a border collie and my husband owns a collectible toystore in Chicago that starts with a Q. Call him and ask. Please. I wanna hear him laugh all the way down the street.

I'm sure this is not organic, but I'm questioning if the organic labels can even be trusted. See the reports on how little honey is actually in many honeys? Even organic ones? Wedderspoon was recently called out for their mankua having under testing very little mankua in it.

The size I previously bought was the same exact one and the bottle shapes exactly as unique although a different label. I guessed since there is so little of this that they are all processed in the same place/same source and labeled by the buyer?

And I do support the local beekeepers around Chicago as well (there's even a honey co-op here!) but honey varies by region and there are some real treasures to try both in flavor and properties. White honey, tupelo, orange blossom, real mankua, ulmo, sourwood, sidr, to name just a few and I find it's a great way to learn about an area actually.

The compounder pharmacy I use interestingly is also a passionate beekeeper (they're in Aurora). Their honey REALLY helps during allergy season but is not great-tasting. I'm not a big dogwood fan and it kinda tastes like ithat smells with a bit of goldenrod? Earthy and mediciny with old lady perfume mixed in. I take a spoonful when my allergies have me stuffed up. Works great!



Two things. Tyger was joking when he called you a "shill." And, thank you for sharing your honey wisdom. I had no idea honey was so expressive. I'm not a huge honey fan, but now I'm interested.

How do you consume the honey so as not to mask the various flavor aspects?

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

LM1968


quality posts: 2 Private Messages LM1968
suteishichic wrote:Yeah, I'd probably try 2000 year old honey if I had the chance. Hopefully it would better than the old expensive egg someone made me once try. *shudder*

A shill? Really? I'm a sahm to a 3 yo and a border collie and my husband owns a collectible toystore in Chicago that starts with a Q. Call him and ask. Please. I wanna hear him laugh all the way down the street.

I'm sure this is not organic, but I'm questioning if the organic labels can even be trusted. See the reports on how little honey is actually in many honeys? Even organic ones? Wedderspoon was recently called out for their mankua having under testing very little mankua in it.

The size I previously bought was the same exact one and the bottle shapes exactly as unique although a different label. I guessed since there is so little of this that they are all processed in the same place/same source and labeled by the buyer?

And I do support the local beekeepers around Chicago as well (there's even a honey co-op here!) but honey varies by region and there are some real treasures to try both in flavor and properties. White honey, tupelo, orange blossom, real mankua, ulmo, sourwood, sidr, to name just a few and I find it's a great way to learn about an area actually.

The compounder pharmacy I use interestingly is also a passionate beekeeper (they're in Aurora). Their honey REALLY helps during allergy season but is not great-tasting. I'm not a big dogwood fan and it kinda tastes like ithat smells with a bit of goldenrod? Earthy and mediciny with old lady perfume mixed in. I take a spoonful when my allergies have me stuffed up. Works great!



Hi again, please feel free to be in touch with us at Wedderspoon , we will answer any questions honestly. Our Manuka in fact is always tested 70% or higher pollen count, Wedderspoon is a company with such integrity, I am proud to be employeed by them. I hope everyone enjoys there wonderful Chilean honeys! I know I love them myself. Thank you Wine Woot and all the Wooters!

rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
suteishichic wrote:A shill? Really? I'm a sahm to a 3 yo and a border collie and my husband owns a collectible toystore in Chicago that starts with a Q. Call him and ask. Please. I wanna hear him laugh all the way down the street.

And he did purchase. You, he and Kyle now have me interested.

CT

suteishichic


quality posts: 21 Private Messages suteishichic

(I wasn't really mad and sorry if my poor stab at humor seemed like I was. No, I just really wanted someone to call my husband and ask. He says he wonders what I do all day. It beats my standard answer of chasing around after a toddler and a border collie!)

As for tastes? I used to bartend a billion years ago. I like playing with flavors and water. Leave me in a tea shop for an hour or so and I'm a happy girl. I love it like I love exploring wines from the history to the regions to the better years and seasons. There are always new things to learn and try, so it's fun.

There are so many different teas to try with different honeys. That and traveling are kinda how I got started with honeys a long time ago. I also use honeys and teas in cooking and baking which I did much more of before kiddo.

Darjeeling and Assam are two staples I use with tasting different honeys.

Darjeeling (first or second flush) are nice, light teas (that can be very fruity) with a clean finish. You can really taste a light honey and sometimes the tea brings out flavors in a honey (and vice versa) that would not be noticed if you just tried a spoonful. The ulmo is great with Darjeeling and it takes a good milk well.

Assam is more astringent to malty so a stronger honey is a nice counter-note. Tupelo can be lovely with it and Assam is what I would first use with trying Tiaca.

A Darjeeling is probably fine with it too, but you will not teally taste the tea, just the honey.

And that's just two of the black teas! There are a zillion combinations. Come to think of it, there was a yellow tea I really loved with the Tiaca. I think I need to buy some new teas before the honey arrives.

Have fun!


suteishichic


quality posts: 21 Private Messages suteishichic

And now Wedderspoon employee, you have me curious about your Mankua. There's a discussion on Amazon about the reports showing little pollen in testing and someone there supposedly from your company said it was illegal to show the actual test results!

I generally only buy UMF certified mankua, but I completely understand that much like the organic certification in the USA, you're paying for a name/label. And I'm not sure if they're being aggressive with protecting their label, the honey, or what.

So, I'm curious. I'd love to compare with the ones I know and also wonder if what is in NZ is the same as is here in the US.