WootBot


quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Corte Cariano Corvina Italian Red (3)

Speed to First Woot:
41m 0.661s
First Sucker:
blessedpancakes
Last Wooter to Woot:
leapfrog58
Last Purchase:
9 months ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 21% of Wine Woots
Bottom 47% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Bottom 16% of Wine Woots
Bottom 38% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 12% first woot
  • 6% second woot
  • 18% < 10 woots
  • 18% < 25 woots
  • 47% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 6% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 6% one month old
  • 6% one year old
  • 82% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 94% bought 1
  • 6% bought 2
  • 0% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

12%
0%
0%
0%
0%
12%
0%
6%
24%
0%
6%
0%
12%
0%
0%
12%
0%
0%
0%
6%
6%
0%
0%
6%
12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting



Quality Posts


Cesare


quality posts: 1614 Private Messages Cesare

Corte Cariano Corvina Italian Red 3-Pack
$57.99 $97.00 40% off List Price
2010 Corte Cariano Corvina, Veneto IGT
CT link above

Website

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

Dave124


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Dave124

Never even heard of this varietal. Kinda cool. Not so sure of IGT through. More of a fan of the DOC/DOCGs. Can anyone comment from personal experience if this is dry or sweet?

chipgreen


quality posts: 187 Private Messages chipgreen

Got a chance to try this with a few others at a get together this past evening. This is a dry wine but it is fruit forward. Somewhat muted nose with juicy cherry and blackberry on the palate. A little bit of spice and crisp acidity on the finish with only a trace of oak.

Very smooth and enjoyable. Four people tried it and all four gave it a thumbs up. We all agreed it was an easy drinking wine. One taster mentioned that it did not pair well with sweet food but it paired well with savory food. However she felt that overall it was better on its own.

I was hoping that it might be priced a little lower than it is, being an IGT, but don't let the designation fool you - this is not a "cheap" tasting wine!

Sorry that I couldn't get more detailed notes but it was kind of a hectic setting and there were multiple wines opened along with additional adult beverages. I will leave you with this quote from my +1 though... she said "it dances on the tongue".

tjg1778


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tjg1778

what does igt mean

zmanonice


quality posts: 21 Private Messages zmanonice
tjg1778 wrote:what does igt mean



Here's a good definition from Wikipedia:

Vini IGP (Wines with Protected Geographical Indication): This category is reserved to wines produced in a specific territory within Italy and following a series of specific and precise regulations on authorized varieties, viticultural and vinification practices, organoleptic and chemico-physical characteristics, labeling instructions, etc. This particular EU regulation is implemented in Italy as the Indicazione geografica tipica designation (IGT). Currently (2013) there are 118 locality designation allowed under the IGT label.

I think Chip's point is that IGTs are typically cheaper than the DOCs and DOCG's in Italy (see definition below for completeness).

Z

Vini DOP (Wines with Protected Designation of Origin): This category includes two sub-categories, i.e. Vini DOC (Controlled Designation of Origin) and Vini DOCG (Controlled and Guaranteed Designation of Origin). DOC wines must have been IGP wines for at least 5 years. They generally come from smaller regions, within a certain IGP territory, that are particularly vocated for their climatic and geological characteristics and for the quality and originality of the local winemaking traditions. They also must follow stricter production regulations than IGP wines. A DOC wine can be promoted to DOCG if it has been a DOC for at least 10 years. In addition to fulfilling the requisites for DOC wines (since that's the category they come from), before commercialization DOCG wines must pass stricter analyses, including a tasting by a specifically appointed committee. DOCG wines have also demonstrated a superior commercial success. Currently (2013) there exist 330 DOC wines and 73 DOCG wines for a total of 403 DOP wines.

sdilullo


quality posts: 36 Private Messages sdilullo

One of these appeared at our local FedEx office on Thursday...

Like some of you, I initially had to head to The Google to learn what the heck Corvina is. Everything pointed to a light-to-medium bodied wine with concentrated flavor.

That instantly reminded me of the Meeker Forklift Grenache offered on here a couple years ago in that it's a varietal typically blended, not allowed to shine on its own. Also similar in terms of dryness and mellowing out considerably when allowed to breathe for 30 minutes.

Initial specs:

  • Wine temperature was 65-68 deg F
  • Poured into a Burgundy glass






Pop 'n Pour:
  • Medium body
  • Not dark but not super bright, sort of plum-colored. Or, for a better reference, colored quite similar to the Wine Woot banner up above, actually!
  • A little smoke, oak, and spice on the initial whiff
  • Gave it a good swirl and picked up some cherry, maybe a bit of cranberry as well
  • First sip - not overly tannic, very dry, picking up some licorice. Going down, a hint of watermelon on the tongue and a little bit of a chalky feeling as well. This screams food wine!






Tasting with some foods:
  • Marinara sauce (Kroger brand, somewhat sweet) - the wine cuts through the acidity nicely, but I'm still getting that chalky thing on my tongue.
  • Homemade pizza with caramelized onion, roasted yellow pepper, and sun-dried tomato - now I'm tasting some anise, the wine was better with the marinara.
  • Beef, bean, cheese dip* with tortilla chips - a surprisingly tasty pairing, I'd say this confirms the wine shines most with meaty, heavy foods.
  • Blue Diamond Smokehouse Almonds - the wine cuts through the smoky flavor and there's a very smooth finish, no chalkiness at all.

*Nacho dip? Yeah, well, it's right before the holidays and we're cleaning out the fridge. So the pairings were truly a hodgepodge of what was on hand. Take what you get, folks.

+30 Minutes:
  • Some of that initial bite or edginess is gone, otherwise much the same

+60 Minutes:
  • It's opened up more, not so harsh now
  • Tasting more berry, still a hint of licorice or anise

+90 Minutes:
  • More berry
  • I was liking it best at this point
  • SWMBO preferred it at the 30-60 minute mark

+120 Minutes:
  • Continues to mellow out
  • Still no doubt in my mind that this is definitely a food wine*

*It appears that Chip and I think differently about this!

We thought this would have really solid QPR in the $13-$15/bottle range. Looks like it's selling around $20/bottle. But don't let that instantly dissuade you...

I think part of that feeling is swayed by the fact that this wine isn't necessarily our style. Not that we have a style per se, but I think we prefer slightly brighter offerings on the whole - Noceto Sangiovese, Old Vine Zins, Wellington Victory and Zins, Scott Harvey's Barberas, etc.

So, if all the notes above sound like something you'll enjoy, by all means click the big yellow button!

my CT | bottles wooted to date: 249
my flying adventures | a mile of road will take you a mile, but a mile of runway will take you anywhere.

nimhgrad


quality posts: 1 Private Messages nimhgrad
sdilullo wrote:One of these appeared at our local FedEx office on Thursday...

Like some of you, I initially had to head to The Google to learn what the heck Corvina is. Everything pointed to a light-to-medium bodied wine with concentrated flavor.

That instantly reminded me of the Meeker Forklift Grenache offered on here a couple years ago in that it's a varietal typically blended, not allowed to shine on its own. Also similar in terms of dryness and mellowing out considerably when allowed to breathe for 30 minutes.

Initial specs:
  • Wine temperature was 65-68 deg F
  • Poured into a Burgundy glass






Pop 'n Pour:
  • Medium body
  • Not dark but not super bright, sort of plum-colored. Or, for a better reference, colored quite similar to the Wine Woot banner up above, actually!
  • A little smoke, oak, and spice on the initial whiff
  • Gave it a good swirl and picked up some cherry, maybe a bit of cranberry as well
  • First sip - not overly tannic, very dry, picking up some licorice. Going down, a hint of watermelon on the tongue and a little bit of a chalky feeling as well. This screams food wine!






Tasting with some foods:
  • Marinara sauce (Kroger brand, somewhat sweet) - the wine cuts through the acidity nicely, but I'm still getting that chalky thing on my tongue.
  • Homemade pizza with caramelized onion, roasted yellow pepper, and sun-dried tomato - now I'm tasting some anise, the wine was better with the marinara.
  • Beef, bean, cheese dip* with tortilla chips - a surprisingly tasty pairing, I'd say this confirms the wine shines most with meaty, heavy foods.
  • Blue Diamond Smokehouse Almonds - the wine cuts through the smoky flavor and there's a very smooth finish, no chalkiness at all.

*Nacho dip? Yeah, well, it's right before the holidays and we're cleaning out the fridge. So the pairings were truly a hodgepodge of what was on hand. Take what you get, folks.

+30 Minutes:
  • Some of that initial bite or edginess is gone, otherwise much the same

+60 Minutes:
  • It's opened up more, not so harsh now
  • Tasting more berry, still a hint of licorice or anise

+90 Minutes:
  • More berry
  • I was liking it best at this point
  • SWMBO preferred it at the 30-60 minute mark

+120 Minutes:
  • Continues to mellow out
  • Still no doubt in my mind that this is definitely a food wine*

*It appears that Chip and I think differently about this!

We thought this would have really solid QPR in the $13-$15/bottle range. Looks like it's selling around $20/bottle. But don't let that instantly dissuade you...

I think part of that feeling is swayed by the fact that this wine isn't necessarily our style. Not that we have a style per se, but I think we prefer slightly brighter offerings on the whole - Noceto Sangiovese, Old Vine Zins, Wellington Victory and Zins, Scott Harvey's Barberas, etc.

So, if all the notes above sound like something you'll enjoy, by all means click the big yellow button!



I can't get this because I'm in VA but I had to say that this was a nice review for others to relate.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 230 Private Messages kylemittskus

Well done on the reviews, gents. Much appreciated.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

rjquillin


quality posts: 173 Private Messages rjquillin
kylemittskus wrote:Well done on the reviews, gents. Much appreciated.

Indeed!

CT

neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

Superb notes fellas...

I like seeing these unique varietals up here... always fun trying new stuff.

Corvina is the main base grape used in Amarone. As mentioned the grapes are from outside the Amarone DOCG, thus the IGT status. Similar production process- the wine is fermented after air drying the grapes.

I agree with the savory food pairing. Maybe a ham (assuming no sweet glaze)?

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

chipgreen


quality posts: 187 Private Messages chipgreen

Wow, very nice review Steve! Guess I need to step up my game. My next review will be a downloadable PowerPoint presentation.

At least I didn't neglect to open the bottle then leave it behind 150 miles from home this time!

I do have a few additional thoughts about food pairings now that I am well rested and a little less foggy than I was when I returned home last evening...

It was my g/f's cousin who said that she thought the wine was better on its own, although she thought it paired well w/savory foods. I did try some finger foods while sipping the Corvina. The first pairing was probably the best and seems to fit right in with other comments. It was something called a "hanky panky" that was ground sausage and beef, smothered in cheese on top of melba toast. The Corvina complemented it very nicely.

It also paired very well with some mini-Quiche appetizers. Good with Colby Jack cheese but not so good with those little hot dog snacks (pigs in a blanket?). Not good with raw veggie platter (not that you would expect it to be). It was so-so with salted cashews, not a detriment but didn't add to the enjoyment either.

So I agree that meaty, cheesy, savory dishes go best with this wine. Probably similar food pairings that work with Syrah would work with Corvina.

Additionally, sdilullo mentioned noticing some cranberry - my g/f also mentioned some cranberry notes on the finish. There is definitely some tartness on the back end that I attributed to acidity. I was surprised at how well integrated the oak was and that the finish was more fruit/acid than oak/tannin.

EDIT to add that I'm glad I ate dinner before going to the party, lol

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman
neilfindswine wrote:Superb notes fellas...

I like seeing these unique varietals up here... always fun trying new stuff.

Corvina is the main base grape used in Amarone. As mentioned the grapes are from outside the Amarone DOCG, thus the IGT status. Similar production process- the wine is fermented after air drying the grapes.

I agree with the savory food pairing. Maybe a ham (assuming no sweet glaze)?



So the write-up makes it sound like it's from the Valpolicella zone...so howcome the IGT classification rather than Valpolicella?

And for those asking about the "inferior" status of IGT wines, remember that some of the "best" wines in the world are Super-Tuscans, which are generally bottled under "Toscana IGT".

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

sdilullo


quality posts: 36 Private Messages sdilullo

Thanks for all the kind words on the review. Figured I'd do what I could to make it as useful as possible!

I should note that my tasting was conducted while frantically wrapping/packing/preparing to visit family for the holidays.

chipgreen wrote:Wow, very nice review Steve! Guess I need to step up my game. My next review will be a downloadable PowerPoint presentation.

At least I didn't neglect to open the bottle then leave it behind 150 miles from home this time!


Yup, we got lucky. Had it been delayed one more day it would've sat at FedEx for a while. And I wouldn't have been able to review it on time!

As for the pairings... I felt that it would be awesome with some Parmesan Reggiano or Sarvecchio Parmesan. Unfortunately, we used ours up earlier in the week. Same thoughts about a good salami or pepperoni.

Would've loved to try it with the baked spaghetti I cooked up on Monday - diced pepperoni, caramelized onions, roasted peppers, roasted garlic, and lots of mozzarella - too. Like Chip said, there are probably quite a few dishes that this would pair with extremely well.

my CT | bottles wooted to date: 249
my flying adventures | a mile of road will take you a mile, but a mile of runway will take you anywhere.

chipgreen


quality posts: 187 Private Messages chipgreen
sdilullo wrote:Thanks for all the kind words on the review. Figured I'd do what I could to make it as useful as possible!

I should note that my tasting was conducted while frantically wrapping/packing/preparing to visit family for the holidays.

Yup, we got lucky. Had it been delayed one more day it would've sat at FedEx for a while. And I wouldn't have been able to review it on time!

As for the pairings... I felt that it would be awesome with some Parmesan Reggiano or Sarvecchio Parmesan. Unfortunately, we used ours up earlier in the week. Same thoughts about a good salami or pepperoni.

Would've loved to try it with the baked spaghetti I cooked up on Monday - diced pepperoni, caramelized onions, roasted peppers, roasted garlic, and lots of mozzarella - too. Like Chip said, there are probably quite a few dishes that this would pair with extremely well.


That baked spaghetti sounds incredible.

Cesare


quality posts: 1614 Private Messages Cesare

Wanted to post some quick late notes. Just got back from a small holiday party with some friends and family, including a friend that works in the wine business here in nyc. The wine was a big hit!

Big beautiful nose of cherry initially, later some smoke and earthiness. Very light bodied but flavorful red berry fruit, very very dry, great acidity. (No oak or tannins).
This is absolutely a food wine. Having it by itself was ok and it smelled like it could be bigger than it was but having it with savory party food made this sing. Really complemented everything we ate with it, bread and cheese, nuts, salad, warm potato salad, lamb, you name it. You really can't go wrong with this. Overall, kind of reminded me of simpler pinot noir or maybe a cru beaujolais (gamay).

This was an interesting wine and kind of unique due to the fact that it's 100% corvina and made more in the typical red wine style we are familiar with*. Which is different than the valpolicella/ripasso/amarone styles this would normally be used for, along with other grapes like rondinella and molinara.
The valpolicella wines are often kind of sweet and full bodied, even a little over the top sometimes, but this was quite restrained and a more true expression of the varietal.
*I see for this they claim a brief gentle drying of the grapes before fermentation which you almost can't tell, unless you have experience with the region. Awesome winemaking skill on this believe me.

What a great treat (early Christmas present?), happy to have tried this! Also happy this brings back nice memories of our honeymoon in the Veneto 3 years ago where we toured some wineries and vineyards. Since it was October it was harvest time and we were able to see some production techniques which was interesting. Ahh I can almost smell the grapes drying on the racks...

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber