woopdedoo


quality posts: 36 Private Messages woopdedoo

Hi All -

I saw this interesting article about Terroir and the recent work done at UC-Davis that uses DNA sequencing to investigate the role of regional microbes in explaining why "place" may make a difference in the characteristics of wine in the bottle. The scientists are otherwise skeptical that other factors really contribute to differences, as it doesn't make a lot of sense that those factors translate into what ends up in the wine bottle. Here is the New York Times article from November 25, 2013.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 231 Private Messages kylemittskus

I think that article is interesting, but if there are that many microbes on the skins, and the diversity of them is so expansive, imagine the microbes and diversity in the soil! No idea, but I would guess that a lot of the terroir comes from the soil.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

rjquillin


quality posts: 178 Private Messages rjquillin

...but would those in the soil make it to the must? Pretty easy to understand how those included in the juice could influence the taste profile. Those in the soil, that don't make it to the must, less so.

CT

kylemittskus


quality posts: 231 Private Messages kylemittskus
rjquillin wrote:...but would those in the soil make it to the must? Pretty easy to understand how those included in the juice could influence the taste profile. Those in the soil, that don't make it to the must, less so.



But the soil microbes affect the soil around them, which the vines are feeding off of, pulling water from, etc.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

chipgreen


quality posts: 195 Private Messages chipgreen
kylemittskus wrote:But the soil microbes affect the soil around them, which the vines are feeding off of, pulling water from, etc.


Yes, the minerals and microbes from the soil leech into the water which is taken up by the vines.

Using Hydrangeas as an example, if you add aluminum sulfate to the soil the flowers will turn blue. If you add lime and phosphorous, they'll turn pink.

I haven't read the above article yet but there is no doubt that terroir has an effect on grapes and the wines produced from them, the big question is how much of an effect.

rjquillin


quality posts: 178 Private Messages rjquillin
chipgreen wrote:I haven't read the above article yet but there is no doubt that terroir has an effect on grapes and the wines produced from them, the big question is how much of an effect.

I did, and it was interesting. The how much is what I was questioning as well, thinking that those actually incorporated into the wine would have a greater effect than those with only a secondary influence on nutrient uptake. Just my wag.

CT