WootBot


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Poll: Should sparkling wine not produced in the Champagne region of France be allowed to be called "champagne?"
  • 36.3% - Oui! 212
  • 63.7% - Non! 372
584 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

rprebel


quality posts: 14 Private Messages rprebel

Anybody can make whisk(e)y, but Scotch comes from Scotland and Bourbon comes from Kentucky. They're similar, but each has its own flavor. As such, it'd be wrong to lump them all together.

Champagne comes from France. Sparkling wine comes from...not France. Besides, the words on the bottle don't matter. Only the contents.

BuffBillsFan


quality posts: 8 Private Messages BuffBillsFan

As a wise man or woman once said...

rprebel wrote:Anybody can make whisk(e)y, but Scotch comes from Scotland and Bourbon comes from Kentucky. They're similar, but each has its own flavor. As such, it'd be wrong to lump them all together.

Champagne comes from France. Sparkling wine comes from...not France. Besides, the words on the bottle don't matter. Only the contents.



DivineAna


quality posts: 9 Private Messages DivineAna

Calling anything from outside France "champagne" is especially problematic when it tastes nothing like the French style of sparkling wine, as is the case for a lot of California "champagnes". I'm pretty sure this is why some people think they don't like champagne-- because they've only had California champagne, and don't like its sickly sweetness.

If they were at least emulating the style (and doing a decent job) it might make sense. There's a reason we have designations like cava, prosecco, etc-- it's not just about the region of origin, it's also about the actual taste of the wine.

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 32 Private Messages ddeuddeg
rprebel wrote:Anybody can make whisk(e)y, but Scotch comes from Scotland and Bourbon comes from Kentucky. They're similar, but each has its own flavor. As such, it'd be wrong to lump them all together.

Champagne comes from France. Sparkling wine comes from...not France. Besides, the words on the bottle don't matter. Only the contents.

Actually, while Bourbon may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the American South in general, and Kentucky in particular.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


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ddeuddeg


quality posts: 32 Private Messages ddeuddeg
DivineAna wrote:Calling anything from outside France "champagne" is especially problematic when it tastes nothing like the French style of sparkling wine, as is the case for a lot of California "champagnes". I'm pretty sure this is why some people think they don't like champagne-- because they've only had California champagne, and don't like its sickly sweetness.

If they were at least emulating the style (and doing a decent job) it might make sense. There's a reason we have designations like cava, prosecco, etc-- it's not just about the region of origin, it's also about the actual taste of the wine.

While I agree in principle with what you say here, I guess I'm a bit of a purist when it comes to Champagne. Fortunately, in my experience, it's quite easy to dismiss anything made in the US that says champagne on the label. That would include anything from my home state of NY.
All, or nearly all, of the reputable producers of really good sparkling wine, such as Iron Horse and Schramsberg, call theirs sparkling wine.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

rprebel


quality posts: 14 Private Messages rprebel
ddeuddeg wrote:Actually, while Bourbon may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the American South in general, and Kentucky in particular.



Thanks. The More You Know ≈≈≈≈≈≈≈≈★

kylemittskus


quality posts: 231 Private Messages kylemittskus

Absolutely, 100% no. I feel the same way about labeling dessert wine made anywhere except Portugal "Port."

What if China started to add "Napa Cab" to their wine bottles (they're producing large amounts of wine, although it's barely passable, from what I've read)?

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

funbunny


quality posts: 26 Private Messages funbunny
kylemittskus wrote:Absolutely, 100% no. I feel the same way about labeling dessert wine made anywhere except Portugal "Port."



I agree completely on this. I really don't want to see E&J Gallo Bordeaux.

"Wine is sunshine held together by water" - Galileo Galilei