sdbcmr


quality posts: 16 Private Messages sdbcmr

Just read a bunch of the drama re: Renwood and its various corporate owners over the past few years.

I came away with only two over-riding sentiments: 1) I hope Terri Harvey got some sweet cash at the end of all this or at least that she was able to hold onto the old vines and 2) I'm glad Scott Harvey landed with solid winemaking opportunities.

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
sdbcmr wrote:Just read a bunch of the drama re: Renwood and its various corporate owners over the past few years.

I came away with only two over-riding sentiments: 1) I hope Terri Harvey got some sweet cash at the end of all this or at least that she was able to hold onto the old vines and 2) I'm glad Scott Harvey landed with solid winemaking opportunities.



Terri still owns the vineyard and Scott still sources grapes from it.

Very interesting reading indeed. I am a huge Scott Harvey fan and was not aware of this backstory. Anyways, new ownership, new beginning for Renwood, I wish them the best of luck. I do wish this was more on the fruit-forward, jammy end of the spectrum, which is how I prefer my Syrah. Saves me some cash this time.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

renwoodwinery


quality posts: 17 Private Messages renwoodwinery
cmaldoon wrote:Scott-

Welcome! 2008 was a very interesting year for CA wine. Lots of fires all over the state. I have recently tasted a number of wines from Nevada county and found almost all of the 2008s to be smoke tainted and many were unpalatable to me.

I know that Amador is significantly (100+miles) south of Nevada county but it is still in the gold country foothills. Were there fires in or near Amador in 08?



I just spoke to one of the locals that lived there in 2008 and now works with us. She remembers those fires but none were close to Amador.

ScottHarveyWines


quality posts: 151 Private Messages ScottHarveyWines

The Renwood story was, to say the least, a big learning experience. First, I would like to say that I like this wine being offered and think Dave Crippen to be a great winemaker. I'm happy to see Renwood in good hands and producing wines that are building Amador as a great mountain appellation.
I built Renwood winery in 1979 as Santino winery for the Santino family. In the mid 80's I bought in becoming a partner. In the early nineties I brought in a partner and we bought out the winery and created the Renwood brand. My partner and I had very different ideas on how to run a wine company and I ended up leaving after harvest in 1995. Renwooed then went through a few winemakers until Dave joined them. I'm happy that Dave has survived to the new ownership and expect the winery to be one of the leading wineries of the area.

InFrom


quality posts: 31 Private Messages InFrom
ScottHarveyWines wrote:Renwooed then went through a few winemakers until Dave joined them.

So you're saying they had to Ren-woo him to join?

Thanks for adding your perspective.

LynnMJ


quality posts: 0 Private Messages LynnMJ
sdbcmr wrote:Just read a bunch of the drama re: Renwood and its various corporate owners over the past few years.

I came away with only two over-riding sentiments: 1) I hope Terri Harvey got some sweet cash at the end of all this or at least that she was able to hold onto the old vines and 2) I'm glad Scott Harvey landed with solid winemaking opportunities.



Here here! So agree with you! As my local wine interests have grown in the last few years (Renwood is an hour away) and I got to know and meet Scott, I had to stop supporting Renwood, plus I had a very unpleasant encounter with the former owner 6 years ago, as a club member even. Given the recent changes (which I'll need to read up on), I may give them a second look now...

renwoodwinery


quality posts: 17 Private Messages renwoodwinery
confusedemmy wrote:So, I'm seeing a conflict in the description:
" Aging/Elevage: 92% Used American Oak: 18 Mo. / 8% Used French Oak: 18 Mo.
....

The finished wine was aged for 15 months in 25% new and 75% 2-year old French & American oak. "

Which is it?



I just spoke with Dave Crippen and he said the former is correct.
---
Aging/Elevage: 92% Used American Oak: 18 Mo. / 8% Used French Oak: 18 Mo
---
He felt the post-tasting notes/specs, which are written by others, must have been a typo.

PemberDucky


quality posts: 41 Private Messages PemberDucky

Staff

renwoodwinery wrote:I just spoke with Dave Crippen and he said the former is correct.
---
Aging/Elevage: 92% Used American Oak: 18 Mo. / 8% Used French Oak: 18 Mo
---
He felt the post-tasting notes/specs, which are written by others, must have been a typo.



thanks for clarifying!


-----------------------------------------------
Not sure if you should post that? This slightly-nsfw-flowchart will help.

btphillips


quality posts: 4 Private Messages btphillips
ScottHarveyWines wrote:The Renwood story was, to say the least, a big learning experience. First, I would like to say that I like this wine being offered and think Dave Crippen to be a great winemaker. I'm happy to see Renwood in good hands and producing wines that are building Amador as a great mountain appellation.
I built Renwood winery in 1979 as Santino winery for the Santino family. In the mid 80's I bought in becoming a partner. In the early nineties I brought in a partner and we bought out the winery and created the Renwood brand. My partner and I had very different ideas on how to run a wine company and I ended up leaving after harvest in 1995. Renwooed then went through a few winemakers until Dave joined them. I'm happy that Dave has survived to the new ownership and expect the winery to be one of the leading wineries of the area.



Thanks for chiming in with your opinion (and the history) on this winery, Scott. I'm never tried Renwood, but in general I love Amador wineries as they seem to produce high quality juice without the pretentious attitude!

wnance


quality posts: 4 Private Messages wnance

I tried this wine last night with my wife and daughter, and saved half a bottle to try with lunch today.

I should preface any tasting notes by noting that I am usually a lurker, not a poster, and haven't written a public tasting note on Woot before. I *have* been drinking a fair amount of syrah of late, much of it from Washington State, with some California and French syrah mixed in, so I do love the varietal. I should also say that my preference is often that for cooler climate syrah- wines that are very focused, fairly low alcohol, and pure, often with strong savory notes emerging to contrast the fruit as the wine opens up. Not fruit bombs. Some of the Cotes du Rossillon syrahs I like from the south of France would be an exception, as they are warmer cimate, so I am fairly flexibile...

I opened the bottle last night, and immediately poured half into an empty 375 split to save for lunch today. The rest was put in an ice bath to cool it down a little (my house was pretty warm at the time) as I try to drink wines around 65 degrees or so, at least to start.

The nose was pretty interesting- I got cherry and pepper, my wife got a strong mineral vibe, and my daughter picked up a little savory note, plus some caramel, probably from the oak.

The palate was a little more straightforward- some pepper, some cherry, plums, etc., with little tannin or acid as a backbone.

As the wine opened up, the fruit became a little more evident, still with some pepper. My best description is candied cherries and stewed plums, medium finish, but not super complex. I thought it was fine, but the sweet/stewed contrast on the palate was not my favorite.

Fast forward to lunch today. I poured a small glass from the 375 split that was left over (also cooled down in an ice bath) and paired it with an eclectic lunch of rotisserie chicken, bacon (always good with syrah), tomato, baguette, olive oil and avocado. The wine went well with the food, having enough tannin to hold its own against light fare. The longer this wine is open, the more I like it. Now, as I type this post, the lunch wine has been open for an hour, and it has finally developed some savory notes that I always enjoy in syrah. There is almost a saline backbone to this wine now, in a good way- much more balanced and interesting.

My guess, from reading other tasting notes in this thread, and also the description on the bottle, which reads: "deep color and soft, lush fruit flavors make this one of our most exciting wines." leads me to believe that this was probably a fruit forward syrah in its youth, and is now 5 years old. With such a high PH (3.7?) I don't believe it has the acidity to age too much longer, and I would consider it a "drink now" wine for sure.

To summarize, I think this is a well made wine, although not in my preferred style. The longer it is open, the better it drinks, which usually is one of my benchmarks as to whether a wine is well made or not. When PNP'd, it is a little more simple, and almost has a residual sugar sort of finish, not unlike some of Wellington's Dukes in the past couple years. With air that perceived "candied" taste fades to the background, and more interesting (to me, anyway) aspects come to the fore, notably a strong savory note.

This is a strong candidate for a daily drinker- where can you get a 5 year old estate syrah for $10? I have enjoyed buying cellared wines from Woot in the past, like the 2005 Arcadian Syrah, and this is no exception.

It is interesting to note that I attended an industry wine tasting yesterday (as a guest of a friend of mine who is a buyer for a local restaurant), and while it was a huge tasting from the largest distributor in NY, there was nary a domestic syrah to be seen. Too bad...

mandoo500


quality posts: 4 Private Messages mandoo500
wnance wrote:I tried this wine last night with my wife and daughter, and saved half a bottle to try with lunch today.

I should preface any tasting notes by noting that I am usually a lurker, not a poster, and haven't written a public tasting note on Woot before. I *have* been drinking a fair amount of syrah of late, much of it from Washington State, with some California and French syrah mixed in, so I do love the varietal. I should also say that my preference is often that for cooler climate syrah- wines that are very focused, fairly low alcohol, and pure, often with strong savory notes emerging to contrast the fruit as the wine opens up. Not fruit bombs. Some of the Cotes du Rossillon syrahs I like from the south of France would be an exception, as they are warmer cimate, so I am fairly flexibile...

I opened the bottle last night, and immediately poured half into an empty 375 split to save for lunch today. The rest was put in an ice bath to cool it down a little (my house was pretty warm at the time) as I try to drink wines around 65 degrees or so, at least to start.

The nose was pretty interesting- I got cherry and pepper, my wife got a strong mineral vibe, and my daughter picked up a little savory note, plus some caramel, probably from the oak.

The palate was a little more straightforward- some pepper, some cherry, plums, etc., with little tannin or acid as a backbone.

As the wine opened up, the fruit became a little more evident, still with some pepper. My best description is candied cherries and stewed plums, medium finish, but not super complex. I thought it was fine, but the sweet/stewed contrast on the palate was not my favorite.

Fast forward to lunch today. I poured a small glass from the 375 split that was left over (also cooled down in an ice bath) and paired it with an eclectic lunch of rotisserie chicken, bacon (always good with syrah), tomato, baguette, olive oil and avocado. The wine went well with the food, having enough tannin to hold its own against light fare. The longer this wine is open, the more I like it. Now, as I type this post, the lunch wine has been open for an hour, and it has finally developed some savory notes that I always enjoy in syrah. There is almost a saline backbone to this wine now, in a good way- much more balanced and interesting.

My guess, from reading other tasting notes in this thread, and also the description on the bottle, which reads: "deep color and soft, lush fruit flavors make this one of our most exciting wines." leads me to believe that this was probably a fruit forward syrah in its youth, and is now 5 years old. With such a high PH (3.7?) I don't believe it has the acidity to age too much longer, and I would consider it a "drink now" wine for sure.

To summarize, I think this is a well made wine, although not in my preferred style. The longer it is open, the better it drinks, which usually is one of my benchmarks as to whether a wine is well made or not. When PNP'd, it is a little more simple, and almost has a residual sugar sort of finish, not unlike some of Wellington's Dukes in the past couple years. With air that perceived "candied" taste fades to the background, and more interesting (to me, anyway) aspects come to the fore, notably a strong savory note.

This is a strong candidate for a daily drinker- where can you get a 5 year old estate syrah for $10? I have enjoyed buying cellared wines from Woot in the past, like the 2005 Arcadian Syrah, and this is no exception.

It is interesting to note that I attended an industry wine tasting yesterday (as a guest of a friend of mine who is a buyer for a local restaurant), and while it was a huge tasting from the largest distributor in NY, there was nary a domestic syrah to be seen. Too bad...



Quality Post!

moondigger


quality posts: 11 Private Messages moondigger
wnance wrote:
My guess, from reading other tasting notes in this thread, and also the description on the bottle, which reads: "deep color and soft, lush fruit flavors make this one of our most exciting wines." leads me to believe that this was probably a fruit forward syrah in its youth, and is now 5 years old.


I have to admit, that description on the bottle did have me a little puzzled after tasting the wine. It's the kind of statement you typically see for fruit-forward wines.

Wine Enthusiast's published review was from August 2011, which makes me think they tasted it almost two full years ago. It seems clear that it was intended to be distributed back then, but was instead left cellared when they ran into the bankruptcy trouble. This lends some weight to your idea that it was more fruit-forward in its youth, but has lost some of that character with age.

wnance


quality posts: 4 Private Messages wnance

Just finished the bottle.

Ended up with a nice fruit (cherries/prunes)/savory/pepper syrah profile. The mouthfeel is a bit "jammy", probably because of the lower acidity, but enjoyable.


moondigger wrote:I have to admit, that description on the bottle did have me a little puzzled after tasting the wine. It's the kind of statement you typically see for fruit-forward wines.

Wine Enthusiast's published review was from August 2011, which makes me think they tasted it almost two full years ago. It seems clear that it was intended to be distributed back then, but was instead left cellared when they ran into the bankruptcy trouble. This lends some weight to your idea that it was more fruit-forward in its youth, but has lost some of that character with age.



moondigger


quality posts: 11 Private Messages moondigger
wnance wrote:Just finished the bottle.

Ended up with a nice fruit (cherries/prunes)/savory/pepper syrah profile. The mouthfeel is a bit "jammy", probably because of the lower acidity, but enjoyable.


We didn't get anything approaching "jammy" with our bottle, but it was completely consumed within a little more than four hours of popping the cork. At the end the fruit had become a bit more forward than in the beginning, so perhaps it would have continued in that direction if it had been left longer in the bottle, or poured into a decanter for several hours.

renwoodwinery


quality posts: 17 Private Messages renwoodwinery
moondigger wrote:We didn't get anything approaching "jammy" with our bottle, but it was completely consumed within a little more than four hours of popping the cork. At the end the fruit had become a bit more forward than in the beginning, so perhaps it would have continued in that direction if it had been left longer in the bottle, or poured into a decanter for several hours.



Thanks to everyone for their personal notes on this wine. It's wonderful to hear how the wine has progressed in just a days time. Although there is value in published reviews I feel a true value expressed here.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus
renwoodwinery wrote:Although there is value in published reviews I feel a true value expressed here.



I could not agree more.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

vgolla


quality posts: 0 Private Messages vgolla
renwoodwinery wrote:The notes say up to 10 years. However later in the thread there are some notes from a recent taster that say this is a "drink now" wine.

Also, later in the thread, there is a link an article that should clear up your #2 question.

I have had the opportunity to taste several older and newer vintages and believe the wines of the same great quality, if not better. Dave is still the winemaker with some fantastic consulting winemakers added to the mix.



I'm happy to add a good word about this wine in particular, and about Renwood in general. I've been a fan for many years, and I've driven past a few hundred Bay Area and Central Valley wineries to return to Renwood several times. I just had my last 08 Syrah two months ago and it was darn tasty; it even felt like it might have another year or two left in the tank.

Now, I'm *really* hoping that Woot also has a case or two of the 08 Jack Rabbit Flat rattling around. If they do, by all means pounce on a case ... that is, after I do!

greyday


quality posts: 51 Private Messages greyday

blah

jchasma


quality posts: 9 Private Messages jchasma
wnance wrote:I tried this wine last night with my wife and daughter, and saved half a bottle to try with lunch today.

I should preface any tasting notes by noting that I am usually a lurker, not a poster, and haven't written a public tasting note on Woot before. I *have* been drinking a fair amount of syrah of late, much of it from Washington State, with some California and French syrah mixed in, so I do love the varietal. I should also say that my preference is often that for cooler climate syrah- wines that are very focused, fairly low alcohol, and pure, often with strong savory notes emerging to contrast the fruit as the wine opens up. Not fruit bombs. Some of the Cotes du Rossillon syrahs I like from the south of France would be an exception, as they are warmer cimate, so I am fairly flexibile...

I opened the bottle last night, and immediately poured half into an empty 375 split to save for lunch today. The rest was put in an ice bath to cool it down a little (my house was pretty warm at the time) as I try to drink wines around 65 degrees or so, at least to start.

The nose was pretty interesting- I got cherry and pepper, my wife got a strong mineral vibe, and my daughter picked up a little savory note, plus some caramel, probably from the oak.

The palate was a little more straightforward- some pepper, some cherry, plums, etc., with little tannin or acid as a backbone.

As the wine opened up, the fruit became a little more evident, still with some pepper. My best description is candied cherries and stewed plums, medium finish, but not super complex. I thought it was fine, but the sweet/stewed contrast on the palate was not my favorite.

Fast forward to lunch today. I poured a small glass from the 375 split that was left over (also cooled down in an ice bath) and paired it with an eclectic lunch of rotisserie chicken, bacon (always good with syrah), tomato, baguette, olive oil and avocado. The wine went well with the food, having enough tannin to hold its own against light fare. The longer this wine is open, the more I like it. Now, as I type this post, the lunch wine has been open for an hour, and it has finally developed some savory notes that I always enjoy in syrah. There is almost a saline backbone to this wine now, in a good way- much more balanced and interesting.

My guess, from reading other tasting notes in this thread, and also the description on the bottle, which reads: "deep color and soft, lush fruit flavors make this one of our most exciting wines." leads me to believe that this was probably a fruit forward syrah in its youth, and is now 5 years old. With such a high PH (3.7?) I don't believe it has the acidity to age too much longer, and I would consider it a "drink now" wine for sure.

To summarize, I think this is a well made wine, although not in my preferred style. The longer it is open, the better it drinks, which usually is one of my benchmarks as to whether a wine is well made or not. When PNP'd, it is a little more simple, and almost has a residual sugar sort of finish, not unlike some of Wellington's Dukes in the past couple years. With air that perceived "candied" taste fades to the background, and more interesting (to me, anyway) aspects come to the fore, notably a strong savory note.

This is a strong candidate for a daily drinker- where can you get a 5 year old estate syrah for $10? I have enjoyed buying cellared wines from Woot in the past, like the 2005 Arcadian Syrah, and this is no exception.

It is interesting to note that I attended an industry wine tasting yesterday (as a guest of a friend of mine who is a buyer for a local restaurant), and while it was a huge tasting from the largest distributor in NY, there was nary a domestic syrah to be seen. Too bad...



In for one- thanks for the input!

Bbqd


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Bbqd

Last fall I purchased six bottles of 2009 Line Shack Syrah and was pleasantly surprised (wish I had purchased more). I am curious if there is anyone out there who has tasted this offering and the Line Shack and could offer some comparisons?

At this price I should just jump in, but I am running out of room... and then there is the wife.

chipgreen


quality posts: 179 Private Messages chipgreen

Great participation for this deal, all the way around! Detailed tasting notes, quick responses by the winery (appreciate the straightforward way in which questions were handled). Awesome cameo from Scott Harvey proving yet again that he is a class act. North, if you're on the fence I am willing to split.

smartheart


quality posts: 94 Private Messages smartheart

Very helpful reviews. Makes the offering a good buy.

And the backstory on the winery was worth reading.

I very much hope that Renwood will offer some Zins here on wine.woot.


"Three be the things I shall never attain: Envy, content, and sufficient champagne."
--D. Parker

renwoodwinery


quality posts: 17 Private Messages renwoodwinery

Just checking in. I'll be around for the next couple of hours to provide info if needed.

Again, I want to thank everyone for their insights and participation. If you have a question or would like more information after this deal ends please don't hesitate to contact the winery or woot.

renwoodwinery


quality posts: 17 Private Messages renwoodwinery
smartheart wrote:Very helpful reviews. Makes the offering a good buy.

And the backstory on the winery was worth reading.

I very much hope that Renwood will offer some Zins here on wine.woot.



Zins from Renwood on Woot? We can do that!
Stay tuned.

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
chipgreen wrote:Great participation for this deal, all the way around! Detailed tasting notes, quick responses by the winery (appreciate the straightforward way in which questions were handled). Awesome cameo from Scott Harvey proving yet again that he is a class act. North, if you're on the fence I am willing to split.



I agree with everything but I will pass on this one. Doesn't sound like my style syrah.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

neilfindswine


quality posts: 167 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

chipgreen wrote:Great participation for this deal, all the way around! Detailed tasting notes, quick responses by the winery (appreciate the straightforward way in which questions were handled). Awesome cameo from Scott Harvey proving yet again that he is a class act.



+1, +1, +1.

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

neilfindswine


quality posts: 167 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

renwoodwinery wrote:Zins from Renwood on Woot? We can do that!
Stay tuned.



Roh-Roh. I better get to work.

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

theistic


quality posts: 0 Private Messages theistic

Received a tracking number last week for this order yet when I check it, it only says "Shipment information sent to FedEx". Any idea about the delay in shipping?

PemberDucky


quality posts: 41 Private Messages PemberDucky

Staff

theistic wrote:Received a tracking number last week for this order yet when I check it, it only says "Shipment information sent to FedEx". Any idea about the delay in shipping?



wine.woot orders can take 2-3 weeks to process and ship. looks like this is still within that bubble. since the wines are shipped directly from the winery, our CS folks are probably still waiting for an update.

feel free to email Support@Woot.com and let them know you're curious about the status of your order.


-----------------------------------------------
Not sure if you should post that? This slightly-nsfw-flowchart will help.

dgk


quality posts: 1 Private Messages dgk
PemberDucky wrote:wine.woot orders can take 2-3 weeks to process and ship. looks like this is still within that bubble. since the wines are shipped directly from the winery, our CS folks are probably still waiting for an update.

feel free to email Support@Woot.com and let them know you're curious about the status of your order.



Mine arrived yesterday, and the bottles are numbered! I think we'll open #2165 tonight.

I have four cats! And Two Roombas.