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Frati Horn Anderson Valley Pinot (3)

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Cesare


quality posts: 1598 Private Messages Cesare

Frati Horn Anderson Valley Pinot Noir 3-Pack
$64.99 $̶1̶0̶9̶.̶0̶0̶ 40% off List Price
2010 Pinot Noir, Anderson Valley, Mendocino County
CT link above

Winery website

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

jimjacks66


quality posts: 31 Private Messages jimjacks66

When the Boontling language is mentioned, I make a point of supporting it. Pinot Noir is one of my favorite varietals so the combo of Boontling and Pinot Noir I trust will be divine.

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin

2010 Frati Horn Anderson Valley Pinot Noir
Frati Horn Wines, Santa Rosa
14.5% AbV

I was fortunate to have received a bottle of this just last Wednesday and eager to share with some experienced pinotphiles this weekend, however that was not to be as both couples were scheduled off to a Cabo vacation on Thursday.
I really detest pulling corks on just arrived bottles, but duty called, so PnP, at around 65F, it was on a Wednesday evening before they departed.

Ron:
Cloudy; but still a typical light cherry to garnet in color, this would appear to be a minimally filtered Pinot. Clearly this will need to be revisited after allowed to settle out for a few days.

Quite aromatic, dominated by fresh fruit, with some cherry cola as well; smells hot of alcohol. Lacking any hints of barnyard, forest or earth I associate with some Pinots.

First sip is shocking, this is very crisp to tart, and the alcohol is showing as well. Dry, no hint of RS and only minimal amounts of oak and tannin were present. Fairly only finish. This is an intriguing bottle that will need to be revisited.

Rick:
A surprising wine. Powerful nose. Good acid. Strong cherry overtones. Very long finish. Excellent legs. Barely detectable tannin. Definitely not a typical Pinot Noir. Medium red color right in the middle of the Pinot Noir range. Should be excellent with steaks and tomato-based
Italian dishes. Too much up-front personality to be my selection for roasts or Prime rib.

Rosalinda:
Smooth, long finish. Good pairing with meat and spicy Italian. Rich red color. Good body. Lots of personality. This is not mainstream Pinot Noir, but is a greatly enjoyable wine. If you're buy buying this and expecting a typical Pinot, you're in for a surprise.

Saturday;
Just SWIMBO and me

This has now settled, capped with my ever present Ar, in the chiller now for a few days and was decanted into a 375 this morning, with the balance into two glasses, the latter capturing both chunky sediment and fine suspended particulate, with some tartrate crystals. The clear 375 and first glass are both very clear.
Beginning at 60F and warming to 68F, the nose is still of fresh fruits and tart cherry, with slightly diminished but still evident alcohol.

Entry is not so surprising this time, but really little changed from day one.
Paired with stir fried marinated pork, asparagus and other veggies over rice, this is a food wine, and would have easily stood up to a much more forceful meal. I later tried this with some hard Vella Jack, Creminelli wild boar and neutral crackers that were delightful.

This presents as a very young wine, and the tartness really does overpower the fruit and minimal wood/tannic structure. I would hope this would, with time, knit together, but lacking the tannins I'm just not sure. It clearly has the fruit and acid to go some distance.

Attempting to put this into perspective with other PN's I've had and enjoyed is difficult, it just doesn't fit. It lacks the finesse and elegance of Joy's Iron Horse Thomas Road, the complexity and old-world balance of a 2007 Mario Perelli-Minetti and isn't as immediately accessible as some of the Meeker's, or even the Buena Vista Ramal Vineyard. Both the Gazzi and Stonier are drink sooner bottles, and while this could be consumed now, hopefully it will integrate into something more than it currently is. It does however present as a quality, if rather unique, bottling.

Will revisit with the remaining 200ml tomorrow.

CT

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman

A friend sent me a bottle of this, arriving on Wednesday at our office in SoCal. Because I know Pinot Noir's travelling reputation I decided to leave it until Friday night to open. After a happy hour at the office (involving an interesting Aglianico-based blend and a natural wine from Lirac, both washed down with ice cream sandwiches - it was a long week, alright?!) I biked on home and started prepping dinner.

Being generally a PN fan, I was excited to try this Anderson Valley bottling, even with a slight question as to its age, being only a 2010. I'd also had molarchae's help in demolishing a bottle of Tudor 2006 Anderson Valley Pinot on Tuesday, so I had a reference frame of sorts.

Colour: cloudy, red/purple, fairly light overall.
Nose: A touch of heat, bright cherry, herbs (rosemary? mint?), a suggestion of jammy raspberry, and a little something savoury I couldn't place.
Palate: Acid. Lots of it. Juicy cherry, ever so slightly faint hint of mushroom in the finish. Decent hit of minerality also. And did I mention the acidity? After a few minutes I was beginning to find the fruitiness overwhelming.

At this point I'm thinking this wine is clearly just too young at the moment and needs a little artificial ageing. Enter the Vinturi. Overall not a whole lot of change, but it did succeed in reducing a bit of the fruitiness.

We decided this was not going to be a superstar match with our pork chops. So we put it away (recork, no inert gas, left on counter at a 68-75 F temp) until tonight. For dinner we killed a bottle of 2008 Vineyard 1869.

Tonight I reopened this around 7pm and was surprised at how little had changed. It had calmed down a touch but wasn't really in a comfortable balanced zone for me.

A few observations over the two days tasting this bottle:
1) Didn't strike me as a typical Pinot Noir
2) Strange combination of very ripe, verging on overripe, fruit but with a huge acid component. I wonder if it was acidulated.
3) If this wine is going to come around, it's going to take 3-5 years for enough acid to drop out of solution to bring it into balance.
4) I normally love high-acid wines, but this one just wasn't quite coming together for me. The almost candied quality to some of the fruit wasn't balanced out, for me, with the earth and mushroom that I love in Pinot Noir.
5) Thinking back to the 2006 Tudor, I should also point out that I can see a similarity in style between the two. The Tudor didn't have any of the candied/jammy sort of flavours but it did have a lot of acid and less mushroom than I expect in PN.

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman
rjquillin wrote:2010 Frati Horn Anderson Valley Pinot Noir
Frati Horn Wines, Santa Rosa
14.5% AbV



Sounds like our experiences with this wine were similar. I wonder if/who else will be reporting in...

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin
klezman wrote:Sounds like our experiences with this wine were similar. I wonder if/who else will be reporting in...

Actually quite similar, excepting my nose doesn't seem as fine tuned as yours on the nuances, but they did evolve and present as it warmed.

CT

chipgreen


quality posts: 186 Private Messages chipgreen

Total Acid: .58 pH: 3.54

Doesn't seem overly acidic, numbers-wise?

I see that Jon from Inspiration Vineyards is the winemaker, perhaps he will stop by later in the day to share some additional thoughts. He did leave a nice Vintner's voicemail for us.

twstdvn


quality posts: 70 Private Messages twstdvn

Hey guys - Jon here from Inspiration Vineyards.

Yup - guilty as charged - I'm the winemaker of this project and would like to answer a few questions raised.

First off - this is unfiltered, and racked probably three times before bottling. Unlike the 08 of mine, offered on WOOT that was only racked once and was VERY cloudy, the sediment in this wine, though slightly present, does settle out very quickly (a couple of weeks) - of course opening the bottle w/in a day or two after receipt will reflect some slight cloudiness and also will pop the acidity up a notch.

As to the question if I added acid to this fruit - no is the answer. Anderson Valley in my opinion often gets colder at night than RRV, and therefore our fruit sources tend to be higher in acid than Sonoma County fruit. Long hang time provides the intense fruit characteristics and the light-handedness of using new oak preserves the fruit.

Anderson Valley Pinot Noirs in my opinion often display flavors of deep dark cherry - and if you're ever up in Anderson Valley, it would be fun to compare this wine to current releases from Golden Eye, Navarro and Foresight to name just a few.

As for food pairing - Smoke Salmon can hold up to this wine, add a little goat cheese w/ some herbs... and now you have my attention.

As for aging - I would say that this wine has changed a lot over the past year and will continue to greatly improve over the next 3 years. I think that the acid and strong foundation of fruit will lend to the ageability, not to mention the lack of browning right now, reflecting a wine that was bottled very young to be allowed to age and come together in the bottle.

With just 35 cases left at the winery, I wanted to get this out in front of the WOOT community for you to try something that I made that I think is really special. If you have any questions, I encourage to keep on asking them! Hopefully later today, proprietors Anne & George will jump in with their thoughts and stories about how Frati-Horn came to be.

Cheers!
Jon

fratihorn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fratihorn

Hello Woot - Anne & George Coughlin here.

We're very excited about the 2010 because it keeps getting better each month as it continue to mature.

We partnered with three Anderson Valley (AV) growers and Jon to craft a classic AV Pinot.

Not only does AV have its own language (Boontling) it also makes its own distinct Pinot. Our goal is to capture that uniqueness because AV produces such great food wines. With full fruit noses and rich bodies and the supporting acid to support your favorite meal.

We look forward to answering your questions and sharing our favorite Pinot with you.

Bahl Hornin ("cheers" in Boontling)
Anne & George

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin
twstdvn wrote:Hey guys - Jon here from Inspiration Vineyards.

Yup - guilty as charged - I'm the winemaker of this project and would like to answer a few questions raised.

First off - this is unfiltered, and racked probably three times before bottling. Unlike the 08 of mine, offered on WOOT that was only racked once and was VERY cloudy, the sediment in this wine, though slightly present, does settle out very quickly (a couple of weeks) - of course opening the bottle w/in a day or two after receipt will reflect some slight cloudiness and also will pop the acidity up a notch.

Jon, thanks for, ahem, clearing things up.

In just the few days this did an impressive job of clearing up, and careful decanting provided a nice clear pour. The cloudiness seems to have had little if any effect on the taste profile.
Was that really some tartrate crystals that settled out with other granular material, or am I incorrectly identifying what I saw?
Can you explain how opening soon after receipt tends to increase perception of acidity, and to what degree?


As to the question if I added acid to this fruit - no is the answer. Anderson Valley in my opinion often gets colder at night than RRV, and therefore our fruit sources tend to be higher in acid than Sonoma County fruit. Long hang time provides the intense fruit characteristics and the light-handedness of using new oak preserves the fruit.

As for aging - I would say that this wine has changed a lot over the past year and will continue to greatly improve over the next 3 years. I think that the acid and strong foundation of fruit will lend to the ageability, not to mention the lack of browning right now, reflecting a wine that was bottled very young to be allowed to age and come together in the bottle.
Cheers!
Jon

Trying to parse your three year comment a bit more; your thoughts are this will really come into it's own in about three years, and really knit together and balance out, but still hold well beyond that? Given the mild tannin/oak profile, can you provide any additional details on length of fermentation and punch downs, and the barrel toast?

Glad to see you back on woot!

CT

Cyradia


quality posts: 29 Private Messages Cyradia

That the heck is up with all of these weird "covert" lab rat reports from long-standing regular peeps in the community? Do you have to know some secret handshake to mysteriously get the bottle shipped to you in advance? Unofficial rogue shipments? Bribes to woot staff?

I miss pre-amazon woot and the above board fun of lab rat reports that were spread over the entire community.

chipgreen


quality posts: 186 Private Messages chipgreen
Cyradia wrote:That the heck is up with all of these weird "covert" lab rat reports from long-standing regular peeps in the community? Do you have to know some secret handshake to mysteriously get the bottle shipped to you in advance? Unofficial rogue shipments? Bribes to woot staff?

I miss pre-amazon woot and the above board fun of lab rat reports that were spread over the entire community.


Next time you see a post from neilfindswine, make sure to look at his signature and maybe you can get in on the fun yourself.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus
Cyradia wrote:That the heck is up with all of these weird "covert" lab rat reports from long-standing regular peeps in the community? Do you have to know some secret handshake to mysteriously get the bottle shipped to you in advance? Unofficial rogue shipments? Bribes to woot staff?

I miss pre-amazon woot and the above board fun of lab rat reports that were spread over the entire community.



There are no labrats. In other news, PM neil and ask him about these beautiful bottles he has -- pretty great collection.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

fratihorn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fratihorn

To the earlier questions about
- fermentation
- punch downs
- barrel toast

We did open bin fermentation that was preceded by a three day cold soak. We hand punched two to three times a day throughout fermentation which lasted approximately 12 days (sorry my notes are not in front of me).

We barreled everything in French oak. 25% was new (med toast) and the remaining was 1 to 2 year old neutral oak.

azn137


quality posts: 0 Private Messages azn137
Cyradia wrote:That the heck is up with all of these weird "covert" lab rat reports from long-standing regular peeps in the community? Do you have to know some secret handshake to mysteriously get the bottle shipped to you in advance? Unofficial rogue shipments? Bribes to woot staff?

I miss pre-amazon woot and the above board fun of lab rat reports that were spread over the entire community.


Not gonna lie, I know little to nothing about wine, so these "lab rat" reports kind of help me decide whether to pull the trigger or not.

For example, before reading the community, I'd never known that 2007 is a good year for wine especially from Cali.

Keep 'em lab rat reports coming!

twstdvn


quality posts: 70 Private Messages twstdvn
rjquillin wrote:Trying to parse your three year comment a bit more; your thoughts are this will really come into it's own in about three years, and really knit together and balance out, but still hold well beyond that? Given the mild tannin/oak profile, can you provide any additional details on length of fermentation and punch downs, and the barrel toast?

Glad to see you back on woot!



Thanks! Glad to be back. Yes, on the tartrates as the sediment precipitates with the Tartaric acid, causing it to fall out.

If I recall, 25% new FO M+ toast. The other barrels were neutral.

Great hearing that the wine settled out. I had hoped it would. I find that sediment sometimes creates either a perceived bitterness or higher acidity, hence my comment. The wine is bright and it's something I like about high acid Pinot's because this wine was made for food, as Anne & George also stated.

Great questions, keep'm coming...
Cheers... JP

twstdvn


quality posts: 70 Private Messages twstdvn
rjquillin wrote:Trying to parse your three year comment a bit more; your thoughts are this will really come into it's own in about three years, and really knit together and balance out, but still hold well beyond that? Given the mild tannin/oak profile, can you provide any additional details on length of fermentation and punch downs, and the barrel toast?

Glad to see you back on woot!



BTW - yes, I do... If this is like a few other Pinot's I've made, it will become silkier with age.

I just opened a 2002 IV PN from Carneros that was still amazing because of the fruit that it originally showed. Our 2007 from the same vineyard still has plenty of life and it's alcohol was in the same range as this Pinot from Mendo Co.

sphervey


quality posts: 39 Private Messages sphervey

From The Prince of Pinot:

** A new discovery was the second release from Frati Horn Wines. This new project was launched by proprietors George and Anne Coughlin in close partnership with Jon Phillips at Inspiration Vineyards and Winery. The 2010 Anderson Valley Pinot Noir ($29) is sourced from three vineyards (Ridley, Balo and Londer). Clones 777, 115 and Pommard. Aged 12 months in 25% new French oak. Light, but flavorful, with alluring strawberry and blueberry fruit and a refreshing cut of acidity, this wine is very food friendly. Frati Horn is boontling for “glass of wine.”

twstdvn


quality posts: 70 Private Messages twstdvn
fratihorn wrote:To the earlier questions about
- fermentation
- punch downs
- barrel toast

We did open bin fermentation that was preceded by a three day cold soak. We hand punched two to three times a day throughout fermentation which lasted approximately 12 days (sorry my notes are not in front of me).

We barreled everything in French oak. 25% was new (med toast) and the remaining was 1 to 2 year old neutral oak.



Thanks G&A. On the road now doing a tasting in IL, so my replies will be delayed. Also just saw your post after answering, glad my memory was correct!

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman
twstdvn wrote:Thanks! Glad to be back. Yes, on the tartrates as the sediment precipitates with the Tartaric acid, causing it to fall out.

If I recall, 25% new FO M+ toast. The other barrels were neutral.

Great hearing that the wine settled out. I had hoped it would. I find that sediment sometimes creates either a perceived bitterness or higher acidity, hence my comment. The wine is bright and it's something I like about high acid Pinot's because this wine was made for food, as Anne & George also stated.

Great questions, keep'm coming...
Cheers... JP



That makes sense. What I don't entirely understand, though, is the seemingly jammy/stewed flavours matched with that kind of high acidity. I love high acid wines that do well with food, but that almost sugary flavour (no RS, I know) of some of the fruit threw me. Is this a result of high diurnal shift and long hang time? Does that somehow let the flavours develop that far while keeping the sugars lower/acids higher? I wish I knew how this one would evolve, because it could be a seriously amazing wine (for my tastes) once that sugary-fruity flavour drops out and more earthy/mushroomy flavours assert themselves.

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin
klezman wrote:That makes sense. What I don't entirely understand, though, is the seemingly jammy/stewed flavours matched with that kind of high acidity. I love high acid wines that do well with food, but that almost sugary flavour (no RS, I know) of some of the fruit threw me. Is this a result of high diurnal shift and long hang time? Does that somehow let the flavours develop that far while keeping the sugars lower/acids higher? I wish I knew how this one would evolve, because it could be a seriously amazing wine (for my tastes) once that sugary-fruity flavour drops out and more earthy/mushroomy flavours assert themselves.

Yes, rather why I was asking about the three year number mentioned. It seems I didn't get the sugar-fruit like you did, and the earth/shrooms bloomed late, after a lot of air time. This seems to easily have the fruit/acid to go some distance, but the subtle tannins cause a bit of concern.


CT

twstdvn


quality posts: 70 Private Messages twstdvn
klezman wrote:That makes sense. What I don't entirely understand, though, is the seemingly jammy/stewed flavours matched with that kind of high acidity. I love high acid wines that do well with food, but that almost sugary flavour (no RS, I know) of some of the fruit threw me. Is this a result of high diurnal shift and long hang time? Does that somehow let the flavours develop that far while keeping the sugars lower/acids higher? I wish I knew how this one would evolve, because it could be a seriously amazing wine (for my tastes) once that sugary-fruity flavour drops out and more earthy/mushroomy flavours assert themselves.



I think your description is correct about why the flavors are what they are and hang time is the reason. For my palette, I don't pick up as much jam as I do dried intense fruit. But I do find with time, this intensity balances out and becomes more integrated.

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman
twstdvn wrote:I think your description is correct about why the flavors are what they are and hang time is the reason. For my palette, I don't pick up as much jam as I do dried intense fruit. But I do find with time, this intensity balances out and becomes more integrated.



Yeah, the "sugary fruity" thing is more just a placeholder for something I can't quite describe better. Dried fruit could work too, but not raisiny, like dried cherry maybe. Wish I'd had another few days to let it slowly oxygenate and see where it would go. It's a very interesting wine and I'm actually quite tempted to go in, set them in storage for 3 years, and see how they're doing.

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

twstdvn


quality posts: 70 Private Messages twstdvn
klezman wrote:Yeah, the "sugary fruity" thing is more just a placeholder for something I can't quite describe better. Dried fruit could work too, but not raisiny, like dried cherry maybe. Wish I'd had another few days to let it slowly oxygenate and see where it would go. It's a very interesting wine and I'm actually quite tempted to go in, set them in storage for 3 years, and see how they're doing.



Exactly... (dried cherry)

Heck, buy the three ok and drink 1 ea yr. that could be fun;)

cortot20


quality posts: 137 Private Messages cortot20

High acidity and unfined/unfiltered PN. Reminds me of the style of your 08' carneros PN. From my own knowledge of the AVA and what the reviewers said this probably is a slightly heavier wine in comparison. When handled correctly it was a wonderful/interesting bottle. I'm looking or cheaper bottles right now as the long term fridge is full but this is tempting.

CT

twstdvn


quality posts: 70 Private Messages twstdvn
cortot20 wrote:High acidity and unfined/unfiltered PN. Reminds me of the style of your 08' carneros PN. From my own knowledge of the AVA and what the reviewers said this probably is a slightly heavier wine in comparison. When handled correctly it was a wonderful/interesting bottle. I'm looking or cheaper bottles right now as the long term fridge is full but this is tempting.



This is a very different wine. The '08 Carneros is very savory, lighter body with what I would describe as a jolly rancher cherry element...

I would consider on the sweet side, with lots of fruit, deeper color and richer texture.

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin
twstdvn wrote:This is a very different wine. The '08 Carneros is very savory, lighter body with what I would describe as a jolly rancher cherry element...

I would consider on the sweet side, with lots of fruit, deeper color and richer texture.

How is that '08 coming along? I tagged it for trying this or next year?

CT

kaolis


quality posts: 27 Private Messages kaolis

fwiw the specs here on winewoot list this as retail of $32 per bottle, when in fact it is $29 per the winery website

Cheers!

neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

Jon, Anne & George- thanks for stopping by on this lovely Sunday...

Opened up a bottle of Fratti as I prepare to grill some dinner.

Definitely getting the rose petal/strawberry on the nose with a shade of herbs and a lil' heat.

Hello acid!!! Tart strawberry - reminds me of those little tart strawberry candies that come in a tin (someone tell me they know what I'm talking about) and a little tart plum preserves? Shade of spice. Long finish. Not surprised that Jon's winemaking resulted in high acid- wanting a little more spice or a note of funky shrooms, but no doubt this is quality, and very refreshing on this warm Sonoma afternoon.

Wondering also how this young one will age.

Also wondering about this Boontling lingo. Were there Hobbits in the Anderson Valley?

EDIT: worth noting, this bottle has been in my wine fridge for a couple o months, not recently shipped as were the others mentioned above apparently.

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

chipgreen wrote:Next time you see a post from neilfindswine, make sure to look at his signature and maybe you can get in on the fun yourself.



Indeed.

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

fratihorn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fratihorn
kaolis wrote:fwiw the specs here on winewoot list this as retail of $32 per bottle, when in fact it is $29 per the winery website

Cheers!



Hi there - Sorry for the confusion. The regular retail price is $32/bottle but we are running a special of $29/bottle now through end of May via our Frati Horn website (www.fratihorn.com), in honor of the Anderson Valley Pinot Noir Festival (May 17-19, in Boonville). - An awesome wine event, if you ever get a chance to attend!

fratihorn


quality posts: 0 Private Messages fratihorn
neilfindswine wrote:Jon, Anne & George- thanks for stopping by on this lovely Sunday...

Opened up a bottle of Fratti as I prepare to grill some dinner.

Definitely getting the rose petal/strawberry on the nose with a shade of herbs and a lil' heat.

Hello acid!!! Tart strawberry - reminds me of those little tart strawberry candies that come in a tin (someone tell me they know what I'm talking about) and a little tart plum preserves? Shade of spice. Long finish. Not surprised that Jon's winemaking resulted in high acid- wanting a little more spice or a note of funky shrooms, but no doubt this is quality, and very refreshing on this warm Sonoma afternoon.

Wondering also how this young one will age.

Also wondering about this Boontling lingo. Were there Hobbits in the Anderson Valley?



Hobbits would have been quite interesting, but no - there were a lot of young men (and women) in the 1880s who lived in this very isolated valley who developed a way to talk about (primarily) drugs, booze and sex - without their parents or other adults knowing what they were saying... (Pretty ingenuous!) Unfortunately Boontling is slowly disappearing as an indigenous dialect as more locals leave the Anderson Valley (or pass away) - That being said, we are doing our best to keep it alive! Bahl hornin'! :-)

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin
neilfindswine wrote:Wondering also how this young one will age.

As are others...

[edit]
Stored in a 375, about half full, no Ar, overnight, this has settled down considerably. That nearly overwhelming acid is receding nicely and finally giving way.
I want, but do not need, this.

Last Wooter to Woot: rjquillin



CT

UncleFluffy


quality posts: 1 Private Messages UncleFluffy

We just drove through Anderson Valley today on the way back from Mendocino. Beautiful, beautiful part of the world. Great PN thereabouts - the only reason I'm not jumping on this one is that we grabbed a case from Harmonique (just up the road) a little while back.

Yum, yum yum.

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin

Why are the states all white?

CT