zolttt


quality posts: 12 Private Messages zolttt
buzzy3814 wrote:IN MY TOWN A HIGH QUALITY PORK ROAST AT THE BUTCHER COST ABOUT $15. GOOD DEAL YOU GOT GOING



obviously you have never bought prepared food before... I take it you never order pizza, becuase they cost about 50 cents to make at home a piece.

Not saying this is the mother load of deals, but if you go to your average BBQ joint, you pay around 10-15 bucks a pound for bbq.

This is 80 dollars for 6 lbs, which is right on par

dtumd


quality posts: 3 Private Messages dtumd

so, i did have to look this up, but since this is a "suckling pig" it means the pig was slaughtered at an age when it was still... suckling. So it could very well be on vegetarian diet because all its eaten is its own mother's milk. i know nothing about that stuff so maybe that's way off. but this is also probably one of the reasons its so expensive, like veal and lamb are more expensive then their fully grown counter parts. baby meat is expensive. It seems wasteful to slaughter perfectly good baby animals when they could grow into delicious larger animals, but I guess it tastes better (though this just seems more fatty).

whitcwa wrote:More like "vegetarian FAD diet".

Seriously now, carnivore meat is usually less tasty than herbivore. Perhaps omnivores taste better when fed a herbivore diet.



jxwhee


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jxwhee

For 85 bucks I could go buy a ribeye roll. Woot what the hell were you thinking selling gnarly meat on the internet at a 5x markup?

jxwhee


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jxwhee

What is weirder buying an 85 dollar pork tenderloin on the internet or the people on Woot defending it as a "good deal".

zolttt


quality posts: 12 Private Messages zolttt
jxwhee wrote:What is weirder buying an 85 dollar pork tenderloin on the internet or the people on Woot defending it as a "good deal".



1 its not a tenderloin.. and 2 its not a great deal, if they were selling a 6 lb uncooked pork roast for 80 dollars that would be silly.

go buy 6 pounds of any prepared food and tell me what the cost is. 6 pounds of damn buffalo wings at a good place in philly (near me) would be 50-60 dollars....

SelfGovern


quality posts: 4 Private Messages SelfGovern
dtumd wrote:so, i did have to look this up, but since this is a "suckling pig" it means the pig was slaughtered at an age when it was still... suckling. So it could very well be on vegetarian diet because all its eaten is its own mother's milk. i know nothing about that stuff so maybe that's way off. but this is also probably one of the reasons its so expensive, like veal and lamb are more expensive then their fully grown counter parts. baby meat is expensive. It seems wasteful to slaughter perfectly good baby animals when they could grow into delicious larger animals, but I guess it tastes better (though this just seems more fatty).



Read the description again -- it says that the porchetta is traditionally a suckling pig, but that this, as in the modern style, is a pork loin wrapped in the skin-on belly.

I don't know if this sucks, but it isn't suckling.

Liberty breeds responsibility

mrln


quality posts: 3 Private Messages mrln

I'm not buying one, not interested in trying it really, too rich for me, already blew my budget this month, etc. But it's pretty clear that specialized meats are also beyond what some people here can emotionally handle.

gmwhit wrote:And this relates to an $80 PORK roast how?



He's obviously replying to your mention of this arriving in time for Easter. iow, this might not necessarily be an offering here because Easter is near.

Read and think before attacking next time. In any case, you may not understand or agree with him, but nothing at all he posted necessitated your tone and your sort of !@#$!$! reply.

And if you really don't care, why are you mouthing off so much?

fiftymegatims wrote:LOL "Vegetarian fed diet".
Pigs are omnivores. Is this supposed to make us meat eaters who think vegetarians are more healthy buy this in thinking that a vegetarian pig is more healthy for us to eat? Niche marketing at its best.



[It seems to be a suckling pig perhaps plus seems other parts.]

Most pigs in some regions of the US are given near exclusively grain feed. It doesn't matter that they're omnivores if they're penned and us humans control what they have available to eat via their feed. It's one of the contributing reasons trichinosis in this country is so low (others being heat treating slop feed in areas that don't exclusively grain/vegan feed, meat inspections, and thorough cooking).

And yeah, it does make them healthier beyond disease reduction. If you notice the pigs used as well as the high fat in the nutrition specs, they seem to be using the pigs that aren't bred for low fat content these days (or as they say, the pigs with the flavor bred out of them). These aren't the far, far leaner cuts sold commonly at your usual supermarkets.

So if they say they are indeed using said pigs, they are probably doing it for taste, and a vegan diet probably restricts the fat buildup in these more than fat prone line (since the pigs already accumulate fat more rapidly than the usual pigs nowadays). So compared to a true "have at it boys" diet that would have these pigs looking like rolling columns of fat, yeah, a vegan diet matters more. Maybe if you saw the prize potbellies from the 1920s and 1930s compared to today (ugly as heck oval or columns of lard with four legs), you'd understand the difference.

cairnblsd wrote:I shudder to think what is used as a preservative. If it keeps any bacteria from growing for weeks just think what it will do to the healthy bacteria living in out digestive track.



How do you know it's simply not sealed and cooked well with the moisture content monitored and then the correct level of salt added on the cut and pieced surfaces?

[The ingredients listed seem to bear this out as well.]

jkarczmit


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jkarczmit
SmilingBoognish wrote:An $80 hunk of meat purchased from the internet. There's a bad joke or three in there somewhere...



Nah, not weird at all. I've bought $80 hams online for the holidays until a good place opened near me. They send overnight in a cooler with dry ice or ice packs. In fact, Creminelli is an awesome company. Bought their sausages on Woot many times. Bought from them directly as well. They even have little specials for people on their email list that no one else gets. Solid company, and not weird shipping expensive meat.

cortot20


quality posts: 136 Private Messages cortot20

Seems like a good deal.
In for the max.

CT

jkarczmit


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jkarczmit
fiftymegatims wrote:LOL "Vegetarian fed diet".
Pigs are omnivores. Is this supposed to make us meat eaters who think vegetarians are more healthy buy this in thinking that a vegetarian pig is more healthy for us to eat? Niche marketing at its best.



Well, Mad Cow disease comes from feeding cow brains to cows. So I'd go with veggie pigs over MAD PIGS! LOL, sounds like a video game title, oh no that's Angry Birds.

snosbig


quality posts: 8 Private Messages snosbig

$80? I'm getting more than porked I hope?

FlamingoNut


quality posts: 12 Private Messages FlamingoNut
snosbig wrote:$80? I'm getting more than porked I hope?

LOL; now that's a quality post.

Probably wouldn't seem quite so bad if a bottle of wine accompanied this little piggy, at this price anyway. Pass.

lurcher


quality posts: 8 Private Messages lurcher
davebva wrote:Today's Lesson #2:

Do NOT use that word around anyone named Art.



perfect way to start the morning, thanks for the laugh

thumperchick


quality posts: 238 Private Messages thumperchick
fiftymegatims wrote:LOL "Vegetarian fed diet".
Pigs are omnivores. Is this supposed to make us meat eaters who think vegetarians are more healthy buy this in thinking that a vegetarian pig is more healthy for us to eat? Niche marketing at its best.



Precisely. Also, just because it's vegetarian doesn't make it good for them - feeding them nothing but GMO corn would be vegetarian.

For a great meat dish, fully prepared, I would consider this price range, but without knowing the company or expiration date or anything, I can't pull the trigger on something this expensive.

tlrowe


quality posts: 7 Private Messages tlrowe
fiftymegatims wrote:LOL "Vegetarian fed diet".
Pigs are omnivores. Is this supposed to make us meat eaters who think vegetarians are more healthy buy this in thinking that a vegetarian pig is more healthy for us to eat? Niche marketing at its best.



Being from a rural farming/ranching community, vegitarian fed pigs is a good idea., and given that vegitarians were rare in Montana, it certainly explains the price...

Seriously, pigs will eat ANYTHING, including dead animal carcasses. It used to a way of getting some value from new-born animals that died during spring storms. I know this is true, cause I spent a fair amount of my youth working on neighbor's farms.

pukeboy


quality posts: 5 Private Messages pukeboy

$80 is a great deal for this. Check the VIN to make sure it's not stolen.

Wait, a "Porchetta" isn't a German sports car?


You're on probation!

You've been put on posting probation for this post for this reason: Inappropriate and gross post. Deleted multiple times for a reason. 48h

Please stare at the scary cartoon dog for 48 hours and then try posting again.

KillianMick


quality posts: 1 Private Messages KillianMick

artisanal: pertaining to or noting a high-quality or distinctive product made in small quantities, usually by hand or using traditional methods

So of course, it would be sold on the Internet...on Woot.

Don't get me wrong - I loooove me some Woot. But this one is kind of oxymoronic. (Or just Huckleberry Houndic, to some.)

rugrats2001


quality posts: 14 Private Messages rugrats2001
ThunderThighs wrote:I'll fire of an email to ask. I'm not going to wake somebody since they'll probably have to contact Creminelli anyway. Should know something later in the morning.



Any new information? How about a guaranteed delivery date?

keithnowak7


quality posts: 11 Private Messages keithnowak7
dtumd wrote: It seems wasteful to slaughter perfectly good baby animals when they could grow into delicious larger animals, but I guess it tastes better (though this just seems more fatty).



The carry over of veal and suckling pigs comes from a time when people raised their own animals. If you have a litter of 9 pigs, but your farm only generates enough feed for 6 pigs, guess what happens to the smallest/unhealthiest 3?

It is far more humane and ethical to thin the herd at birth and ensure the ones you raise to adult have ample food, space, and other necessities.

Nowadays, it is done pretty much for gourmet people, but it was very reasonable and sane practice for thousands of years.

hayyim


quality posts: 2 Private Messages hayyim

Just in time for Passover!

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 560 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff


NEWS FLASH: No jelly included. That was the holiday offer.



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thumperchick


quality posts: 238 Private Messages thumperchick
keithnowak7 wrote:The carry over of veal and suckling pigs comes from a time when people raised their own animals. If you have a litter of 9 pigs, but your farm only generates enough feed for 6 pigs, guess what happens to the smallest/unhealthiest 3?

It is far more humane and ethical to thin the herd at birth and ensure the ones you raise to adult have ample food, space, and other necessities.

Nowadays, it is done pretty much for gourmet people, but it was very reasonable and sane practice for thousands of years.



That is the first logical reason I've heard for the practices origins. Thanks.

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
fiftymegatims wrote:LOL "Vegetarian fed diet".
Pigs are omnivores. Is this supposed to make us meat eaters who think vegetarians are more healthy buy this in thinking that a vegetarian pig is more healthy for us to eat? Niche marketing at its best.



So two things here:
1) As mentioned above, when you feed animals food that contains their own kind it can lead to mad cow like disease. So veggie is safer.

2)Pigs taste like whatever they ate for the last however many months of their lives. You want tasty and very expensive pork? Try acorn finished... Something unique about how pigs incorporate fatty acids in their own fat or somesuch.

That said, for a porchetta made from belly and tenderloin and not a suckling pig, this seems pricey. I'm sure it's excellent though, being Crimellini....

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa

Cowboy Dann - it should definitely make it by Easter Sunday. We should be shipping everything out by the 27th and you'll get it on the 28th.

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa

Traditionally it was suckling pig, but pig-loving Italians got savvy to the fact that feasting on suckling pig would prevent from making other things in the future.

So this is the more modern take you'll find in Italy - skin on pork belly wrapped around marinate sirloin piece. Our recipe comes from the town of Ariccia (we go special permission to use their 2,000 year old recipe), so we think it's pretty legit!


dtumd wrote:so, i did have to look this up, but since this is a "suckling pig" it means the pig was slaughtered at an age when it was still... suckling. So it could very well be on vegetarian diet because all its eaten is its own mother's milk. i know nothing about that stuff so maybe that's way off. but this is also probably one of the reasons its so expensive, like veal and lamb are more expensive then their fully grown counter parts. baby meat is expensive. It seems wasteful to slaughter perfectly good baby animals when they could grow into delicious larger animals, but I guess it tastes better (though this just seems more fatty).



creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa

The porchetta is actually skin-on pork belly wrapped around marinated sirloin. The pork comes from heritage breed pigs raised without hormons and antibiotics, plus we don't we use any fillers or additives. It's just straight up delicious meat that's roasted in ovens designed by Italians specifically for porchetta. Ready to eat. You can slice it up and make the best sandwiches. Or just reheat in the oven and get the crackling going. Delicious.

jxwhee wrote:What is weirder buying an 85 dollar pork tenderloin on the internet or the people on Woot defending it as a "good deal".



ThunderThighs


quality posts: 560 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

creminellivanessa wrote:Cowboy Dann - it should definitely make it by Easter Sunday. We should be shipping everything out by the 27th and you'll get it on the 28th.



WELCOME! Glad to have you here answering all the questions!



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creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa

Thumper Chick - check out our website for some info. We pay more for our raw ingredients, especially the heritage Duroc pork because we don't think the antibiotics and hormones and caged-in living conditions of industrial pork makes for good salumi (which includes salumi, prossciutto, and cooked products like porchetta). Our products are Whole Foods approved and sold in high end shops around the country.

Cristiano, the salumi artisan, was also named one of America's Tastemakers by Bon Appetit magazine http://www.bonappetit.com/magazine/tastemakers-2012

And we're recognized by Slow Food as a legit source of meat. Check it out and let us know what you think. vanessa@creminelli.com

thumperchick wrote:Precisely. Also, just because it's vegetarian doesn't make it good for them - feeding them nothing but GMO corn would be vegetarian.

For a great meat dish, fully prepared, I would consider this price range, but without knowing the company or expiration date or anything, I can't pull the trigger on something this expensive.


creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa

KillianMick,
All of us Creminelli love a good deal. We understand that our product costs more - we pay more for our raw matierals - but every so often we like to offer things for a holiday, etc. We do sell directly through our website quite a bit! We're all lovers of buying online, so if we can share the love with the Woot community (a lot of us shop here) than we're pretty stoked.

KillianMick wrote:artisanal: pertaining to or noting a high-quality or distinctive product made in small quantities, usually by hand or using traditional methods

So of course, it would be sold on the Internet...on Woot.

Don't get me wrong - I loooove me some Woot. But this one is kind of oxymoronic. (Or just Huckleberry Houndic, to some.)



creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa

rugrats2001,
We should have everything shipped by 27th, meaning you'd get the porchetta the Thursday before Easter Sunday!

rugrats2001 wrote:Any new information? How about a guaranteed delivery date?



kurtmeister


quality posts: 1 Private Messages kurtmeister

uuuummmmmm. $80 for 5 pounds of Wilbur is $16 per pound, which I would NEVER pay ANYWHERE. I'd like to know who is paying full retail price at $22 per pound. I have some "artisan" vintage socks I'll sell you for 50% off retail.. just $50 a pair.

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
snosbig wrote:$80? I'm getting more than porked I hope?



Lol, yes, you're getting the most delicious roast around! Skin on pork belly wrapped around marinated sirloin. The recipe comes from the hometown of the original porchetta (Ariccia, Italy). It's already cooked - so ready to eat or re-heat. The crackling you get from it is AMAZING.

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
kurtmeister wrote:uuuummmmmm. $80 for 5 pounds of Wilbur is $16 per pound, which I would NEVER pay ANYWHERE. I'd like to know who is paying full retail price at $22 per pound. I have some "artisan" vintage socks I'll sell you for 50% off retail.. just $50 a pair.



It does seem like a lot but it's pretty fabulous. It comes already cooked, so it just requires a re-heat (the crackling skin is AMAZING) or you can serve cold, sliced for sandwiches.

We don't really cut corners. So this won't have any fillers, preservatives, etc. Our meat is all-natural heritage Duroc breed, raised without antibiotics and hormones. The vegetarian diet ensures they haven't eaten industrial feed that can include things too gross to mention.

The quality we take seriously. You definitely pay for what you get. If you try it, definitely let us know what you think. vanessa@creminelli.com

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
mwinkykitty wrote:I don't get it...

It's an $85 stuffed pork tenderloin? Is this really the demographic Woot sells to now?



It's actually a style of pork roast using two whole muscle cuts, not tenderloin. It's skin-on pork belly wrapped around seasoned sirloin. The pork comes from all-natural heritage breeds raised without hormones and antibiotics, fed on a vegetarian diet (industrially-raised pigs often feed shady things to the pigs including animal waste and other bi-products), and they were never confined. This better quality of life makes for better pork. It definitely tastes better (stress hormones are not good).

The recipe we use comes from the town of Ariccia, Italy. 2,000 years old and still delicious. It's definitely worth the price, comparable that way to other high quality meats shipped to folks. Plus, it comes already cooked, so you can slice it up for killer sandwiches or re-heat for AMAZING crackling.

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
zener wrote:Seems like an OK deal to me I cant get good meats like this out in the sticks I live in. My question is that it says USE WITHIN A WEEK AFTER OPENING PACKAGING. Does that mean if refrigerated? Can I freeze some for later?

Do I need to finish the whole jar of jam in a week as well? I guess that would happen on day 6 when im running out of time and eating furiously.



No need to eat furiously, though the porchetta is so damn good, you just might.

It comes vaccum sealed, so we suggest consuming it within a week of opening. We don't generally encourage folks to freeze our stuff, but if you need to freeze a portion for later, go for it. Simply thaw it out overnight in the fridge and it should be good to go. Just make sure to vaccum seal (if you can) or wrap it tightly to prevent freezer burn.

The jam should keep as others do in the fridge once opening.

So feast at whatever pace you'd like

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
sinsemilla wrote:$14-$17 a pound for pork belly wrapped around pork tenderloin and shoulder? Those cuts of meat are only $2-$3 a pound where I live.

What a rip off. The ridiculous price per pound combined with three cuts of meat that need totally different cooking techniques is mind boggling.



Yeah, it's more than what folks are used to. But everyone who's tasted it completely loves it.

Our pork - all of our raw ingredients - are a higher quality than most products out there on the market. A good quality life - no hormones nor antibiotics, a cage-free existence, wholesome vegetarian feed - creates better quality pig. We pay more, but it's just better suited to what Crisitano (the salumi artisan whose family has been doing this for hundreds of years) does.

No fillers, either. We don't pump it full of water or preservatives. What you see is what you get. It's straight up delicious meat that's already cooked in ovens specially designed for porchetta.

Traditionally porchetta is several cuts of meat - to mimic a whole pig roast and it's been around for at least 2,000 years. Our recipe for it comes from the town of Ariccia, the heartland of porchetta. In Italy, it's considered the original street food!

So slice it up straight from out of the packaging or roast it up to get that glorious crackling. It's good

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
buzzy3814 wrote:FOR THAT PRICE,DOES THAT INCLUDE THE COOKS TRAVEL TO THE HOUSE TO COOK IT ?



LOL, it already comes cooked! Though sending the salumi artisan Cristiano out to make surprise house calls would be fun ...

Seriously though, just slice it up when cold for sandwiches or you can roast it up in the oven. Each shipment comes with heating insturctions.

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
antfarmer wrote:Wow, $80 for a chunk of meat moldering and decomposing for a week in trucks and the back of the post office van. How appetizing.
Just think, I saw a better chunk of pork at Piggly Wiggly last week for $7 and it wasn't even rotted when I got it home!
I think somebody bought up the 7000 dead diseased pigs floating down the river in China and decided to get rich quick. 'Seasoned' means fermented in the industrial waste of the Yangtze.



Thankfully, we've got sources of pork that are FAR MORE quality than those being dealt with in other parts of the world unfortunately.

So our pork is all-natural heritage breed. Good ratio of fat to lean meat. And they're raised well by people who take what they do seriously. That means the pork is antibiotic/hormone-free, fed a vegetarian diet (the "omnivore" feed is sketchy with animal waste and other by-products), and raised without confinement. It seriously makes for better tasting meat.

We never use frozen product so the meat is fresh by the time we season and marinate the cuts and then roast it in ovens designed by Italians specifically for porchetta (the government structure might not be great, but the Italian do know how to design a great cooking oven). The recipe itself we got permission from the town of Ariccia, Italy to use. It's already cooked - just slice and serve on sandwiches (it's the ultimate street food in Italy) or re-heat for amazing crackling. Instructions included.

And we ship FedEx overnight, so no lingering in the back of any shipping vechile. If the roast ever did, we'd have a conversation with FedEx...

creminellivanessa


quality posts: 9 Private Messages creminellivanessa
cairnblsd wrote:I shudder to think what is used as a preservative. If it keeps any bacteria from growing for weeks just think what it will do to the healthy bacteria living in out digestive track.



Definitely NO PRESERVATIVES. No fillers. NO chemicals. Just meat and seasoning.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
cairnblsd wrote:I shudder to think what is used as a preservative. If it keeps any bacteria from growing for weeks just think what it will do to the healthy bacteria living in out digestive track.



A salt pack would do that just fine, rinse it off and good to go. I don't know what htey use, but could be that

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