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quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

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Mahoney Vineyards Carneros Syrah (6)

Speed to First Woot:
2m 59.669s
First Sucker:
tonigoogoo
Last Wooter to Woot:
Allieroon
Last Purchase:
a year ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 30% of Wine Woots
Bottom 46% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Bottom 44% of Wine Woots
Top 47% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

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  • 0% second woot
  • 9% < 10 woots
  • 24% < 25 woots
  • 59% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 7% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 1% one month old
  • 9% one year old
  • 83% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 96% bought 1
  • 3% bought 2
  • 1% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

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Quality Posts


Cesare


quality posts: 1473 Private Messages Cesare

Mahoney Vineyards Carneros Syrah 6-Pack
$89.99 $̶1̶5̶1̶.̶0̶0̶ 40% off List Price
2008 Mahoney Vineyards Carneros Syrah
2009 Mahoney Vineyards Carneros Syrah
CT links above

Winery website

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

ROGETRAY


quality posts: 140 Private Messages ROGETRAY

Staff

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Chinaguy00


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Chinaguy00

Anyone had this? Big Syrah fan but need some assistance here...

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
Chinaguy00 wrote:Anyone had this? Big Syrah fan but need some assistance here...



Hi there-
I'm Ken Foster, winemaker for Mahoney Vineyards... so I may have a biased palate, but at least I have had the wine... recently even...
What style do you look for in the Syrah world? We go for balance, not raw power... avoiding new oak and big extract, aiming for a softer, more fruit driven style. The 2008 is a classic cooler climate example, although without the sharper green peppercorn notes you sometimes get in cold regions. The 2009 is more ripe, with dense fruit that stops short of seeming cooked or jammy. Anyway, let me know if I can answer any questions. And to the Woot crowd at large, thanks for having us!

trifecta


quality posts: 66 Private Messages trifecta

Any chance we can get some stats in addition to alc? I'm into cool climate syrah's and this may be a winner if it has the right structure. Hopefully pH under 3.6

trifecta


quality posts: 66 Private Messages trifecta
mvwinemaker wrote:Hi there-
I'm Ken Foster, winemaker for Mahoney Vineyards... so I may have a biased palate, but at least I have had the wine... recently even...
What style do you look for in the Syrah world? We go for balance, not raw power... avoiding new oak and big extract, aiming for a softer, more fruit driven style. The 2008 is a classic cooler climate example, although without the sharper green peppercorn notes you sometimes get in cold regions. The 2009 is more ripe, with dense fruit that stops short of seeming cooked or jammy. Anyway, let me know if I can answer any questions. And to the Woot crowd at large, thanks for having us!



Thanks for joining us. Welcome. I am trying to resolve your description of less extracted, but fruit driven. Can you comment on some additional stats like pH and TA? Thanks again.

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
trifecta wrote:Any chance we can get some stats in addition to alc? I'm into cool climate syrah's and this may be a winner if it has the right structure. Hopefully pH under 3.6


I don't have the exact numbers at hand, but I would guess we're in the 3.65 to 3.7 range. One thing that happens in cool climates is that when sugar comes up slowly, and you wait for riper flavors, acids can drop off... We typically will adjust acid with a goal of finishing Malolactic at a pH in the 3.6's. At least in California, it's rare to get the fruit expression and end up below 3.6 without adding acid... but those adds, done in fermenter, knit nicely into the wine.

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
trifecta wrote:Thanks for joining us. Welcome. I am trying to resolve your description of less extracted, but fruit driven. Can you comment on some additional stats like pH and TA? Thanks again.


By less extracted, I'm referring to fermenter management. We use small, open top tanks for the Syrah, destemming without crushing to retain whole berries, and limiting punch-downs to one per day after the midpoint of fermentation to keep from extracting excess tannins from the seeds. It's very much a Pinot Noir strategy applied to Syrah, but I have found that the more tannin you extract, the more you tend to lose the fruit... and I like fruit better than tannin. The greater percentage of whole berries also lends a fresher fruit note, while protecting the seeds from too much exposure, and hence extraction.

redhothall


quality posts: 0 Private Messages redhothall

Not shipping to Michigan, what a pity.

nhf1cjc


quality posts: 1 Private Messages nhf1cjc
redhothall wrote:Not shipping to Michigan, what a pity.



yes..what a shame

sphervey


quality posts: 34 Private Messages sphervey



More input:

http://www.napawineproject.com/Napa-Wineries/?id=413

http://thewinespies.com/directory/wine/386

The Winespies link is for an older vintage but gives you info on the style of wine which may help you decide . . .

http://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/wine/article_5a923c0e-1570-5556-bca2-64d247e4c450.html

Amazing depth of experience for this winemaker from what I've read. I hope to see more of their wines here. May have to break my SIWBM today.

cassandtim


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cassandtim

As I share the same last name as the winery I feel like it is my destiny to buy and enjoy this wine. I don't often(ever) post here but very much enjoy the wines and the discussions.
I do have a question about shipping. Planning on shipping to FL to family but they will only be there through the end of March. I see the note about shipping in 3-5 days but was just hoping to be reassured. Odds on arriving in Estero FL by month end?
Thanks.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 225 Private Messages kylemittskus
mvwinemaker wrote:I don't have the exact numbers at hand, but I would guess we're in the 3.65 to 3.7 range. One thing that happens in cool climates is that when sugar comes up slowly, and you wait for riper flavors, acids can drop off... We typically will adjust acid with a goal of finishing Malolactic at a pH in the 3.6's. At least in California, it's rare to get the fruit expression and end up below 3.6 without adding acid... but those adds, done in fermenter, knit nicely into the wine.



Love the transparency about acidulation. That kind of honesty will you get you far around here, as will your participation. Welcome and thanks for jumping in.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

true559


quality posts: 22 Private Messages true559

Sounds like something right up my alley. $22 for the 09 on the website so this appears to be a good deal. I can't find any info on the 08. Anyone have anything more to say regarding the 08? I need something to push me over the fence on this one.

Winedavid39


quality posts: 180 Private Messages Winedavid39

Guest Blogger

sphervey wrote:More input:

http://www.napawineproject.com/Napa-Wineries/?id=413

http://thewinespies.com/directory/wine/386

The Winespies link is for an older vintage but gives you info on the style of wine which may help you decide . . .

http://napavalleyregister.com/lifestyles/food-and-cooking/wine/article_5a923c0e-1570-5556-bca2-64d247e4c450.html

Amazing depth of experience for this winemaker from what I've read. I hope to see more of their wines here. May have to break my SIWBM today.



Ken, can you go into detail about your wine making experience? Thanks for jumping on.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee

Ugh, I'm pretending like I'm still poor and holding to the SIWBM and the I have no time to drink a bottle anyway moratorium, but I'm a huge Syrah fan and this sounds fun, and a good price. I think I will need to throw myself into my work today and then forget about this later or I will buy, no doubt!

Work, who am I kidding, I'll need to find a dark corner to nap in, get paid, then go home and play video games.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

connoda


quality posts: 1 Private Messages connoda

I'm snagging one to give it a try. My wife and I stopped by the vineyard on our trip to Napa and bought some Albarinos that were wonderful to drink. Everyone who tasted them raved. These guys can definitely make some fab wine that I do know so taking a chance on this Syrah is safe in my humble opinion. Hopefully you guys will offer the Albarino next!

blukat44


quality posts: 1 Private Messages blukat44

I am interested in these wines, but I only want 1 of each, anyone willing to split with me? I'm located in SoCal, LA area. Thanks!

winesmith


quality posts: 32 Private Messages winesmith
Winedavid39 wrote:Ken, can you go into detail about your wine making experience? Thanks for jumping on.



You guys may not know who you're dealing with in Ken Foster. I went to school with him at Davis in the early '80s, and he went on to run David Bruce in the Santa Cruz Mountains - incredible Pinots and Syrahs. He's always had a wonderfully skilled hand, and understands all about structure, balance, longevity and soulfulness. He's a highly respected innovator and a sought-after speaker, but with a classic aesthetic. His wines are always graceful, focused and well knit.

Francis Mahoney, who started Carneros Creek in the 70s, did a lot of the early investigation into Pinot Noir clones, so as a team, these guys really know their terroir.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 225 Private Messages kylemittskus
blukat44 wrote:I am interested in these wines, but I only want 1 of each, anyone willing to split with me? I'm located in SoCal, LA area. Thanks!



Come to the SoCal gathering!

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
winesmith wrote:You guys may not know who you're dealing with in Ken Foster. I went to school with him at Davis in the early '80s, and he went on to run David Bruce in the Santa Cruz Mountains - incredible Pinots and Syrahs. He's always had a wonderfully skilled hand, and understands all about structure, balance, longevity and soulfulness. He's a highly respected innovator and a sought-after speaker, but with a classic aesthetic. His wines are always graceful, focused and well knit.

Francis Mahoney, who started Carneros Creek in the 70s, did a lot of the early investigation into Pinot Noir clones, so as a team, these guys really know their terroir.



This does not help my quest to not buy this today.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
Winedavid39 wrote:Ken, can you go into detail about your wine making experience? Thanks for jumping on.

Sure...
It's a short resume, as I've spent big chunks of time with 2 wineries. I started with David Bruce Winery in 1987, sneaking in the back door to work harvest knowing pretty much nothing about making wine. I was motivated to learn how the attributes of different sites translated into the wines... before the word Terroir was commonplace in California. Around 1990, we began to shift the focus of the winery from Chardonnay to Pinot Noir, and explore regions from all over the state, eventually creating about 12 unique Pinots, and another 10-15 other wines per year. I developed a fondness for small open topped fermenters, allowing us to isolate small vineyard blocks, as well as vary treatments during fermentation to create a bigger "spice cabinet" of flavors in the cellar. When I left David Bruce in 2002, I came to Carneros Creek Winery in Napa, which Francis Mahoney started in the early 1970's. I was tempted by the diversity of clones, rootstocks and soils within the Estate vineyards, which can create a remarkable range of flavors considering that it's all in Carneros. In a typical harvest we produce 25-30 different lots of Carneros Pinot Noir, and then blend to create distinct styles for the Mahoney and Fleur brands. (The Carneros Creek label was sold in 2004, but Francis kept the Vineyards.) It's been a great opportunity to focus in depth on that relationship between site and wine. Additionally, Francis has a number of entertaining experimental blocks, which is where the Syrah comes in... along with Sangiovese, Vermentino, Nebbiolo, Tempranillo, Montepulciano, Albarino, and so on. Based in Carneros, we also grow Chardonnay for the Mahoney label, and bottle 3-4 Pinot Noirs as well. All that gives plenty of opportunity for the small fermenter program, even if it makes the cellar a bit crazy at harvest.
If I were to generalize, I would say my goal for the Mahoney wines is to try to let the vineyards do the talking, as opposed to the winemaking. We don't use much new oak as a rule, (and never in the Syrah), and work to keep fruit foremost in the wines. I do, however, like longish barrel aging, to get past the simpler, grapey flavor profiles. These Syrahs spent about 22 months in Neutral French oak, and it's not unusual for our Pinots to get 18-20 months in barrel as well. As a rule, we go to barrel soon after fermentation, and let the wine stay on the lees until just prior to bottling. We are believers in filtration as a means of preserving fruit...but rely only on Crossflow filtration at bottling. Feel free to ask questions if you have them!
Thanks-
Ken

katc007


quality posts: 0 Private Messages katc007

What is the new thing with Woot charging tax? Does this depend on the vineyard the wine is coming from or is this a new thing for the Woot site??
Also, does anyone know if this wine is on the spicy side?!

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
connoda wrote:I'm snagging one to give it a try. My wife and I stopped by the vineyard on our trip to Napa and bought some Albarinos that were wonderful to drink. Everyone who tasted them raved. These guys can definitely make some fab wine that I do know so taking a chance on this Syrah is safe in my humble opinion. Hopefully you guys will offer the Albarino next!


We have actually discussed an Albarino offering through Woot, so stay tuned. I'm glad you had a chance to try that wine... like the Syrah, it's pretty limited, usually 100-200 cases is all we bottle. Our Albarino is planted at the Las Brisas Vineyard, which is foggy and windy, and seems ideal for that varietal

netfortius


quality posts: 0 Private Messages netfortius

OT- tried to order, but the services/ers seem to be down. Anybody else having this problem?

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
katc007 wrote:What is the new thing with Woot charging tax? Does this depend on the vineyard the wine is coming from or is this a new thing for the Woot site??
Also, does anyone know if this wine is on the spicy side?!


I would say that there is some black pepper in the nose, but that the fruit (blackberry, dark cherry) carries the wine. I have tasted Carneros Syrahs that are very much driven by green peppercorn aromas, and these are not. Despite being in a cooler climate, we typically pick Syrah fairly ripe, so I think we lose some of that spice while gaining fruit.

moondigger


quality posts: 11 Private Messages moondigger

Interesting to hear you worked at David Bruce. I liked several of the Bruce Pinots from those vintages.

I'm trying to resist this offer, because I already have too much woot wine on the way and no room left in my wine chiller. But I'm tempted...

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
moondigger wrote:Interesting to hear you worked at David Bruce. I liked several of the Bruce Pinots from those vintages.

I'm trying to resist this offer, because I already have too much woot wine on the way and no room left in my wine chiller. But I'm tempted...


Just be sure to drink it before the weather gets hot! We had a great team at David Bruce, and evolved a unique style of Pinot Noir there. I think what I do at Mahoney is more similar to the Santa Cruz Mountains bottling from DB than the Central Coast or Russian River wines there. We used more oak at DB than here at Mahoney as well, but I think our Estate fruit stands capably on it's own, and higher levels of oak tend to mask the fruit.

blukat44


quality posts: 1 Private Messages blukat44
kylemittskus wrote:Come to the SoCal gathering!



When and where is that? Or, is there a forum that is discussing this? Thanks!

moondigger


quality posts: 11 Private Messages moondigger
mvwinemaker wrote:Just be sure to drink it before the weather gets hot! We had a great team at David Bruce, and evolved a unique style of Pinot Noir there.


I remember being impressed by the nose on the first Bruce Pinot I ever tried. I was sort of in a Pinot rut at the time, and relied mostly on Oregon/Willamette Valley Pinots. There were only two California Pinots I liked up to that point, namely Saintsbury (which it seemed like everybody liked) and Estancia (which I liked but for some reason few people I knew liked). The Bruce had a better nose than either of the other California Pinots and a very different character than the Oregon Pinots. I quickly became a fan.

We used more oak at DB than here at Mahoney as well, but I think our Estate fruit stands capably on it's own, and higher levels of oak tend to mask the fruit.


I guess I risk alienating some others here on woot by saying this, but I like oak, especially in cabs and zins. But that doesn't mean I want it in every wine, and I've enjoyed Shiraz/Syrahs both ways.

I may have to get one of these and then split it with a friend.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 225 Private Messages kylemittskus
blukat44 wrote:When and where is that? Or, is there a forum that is discussing this? Thanks!



http://wine.woot.com/forums/viewpost.aspx?postid=5315145&pageindex=1

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

blukat44


quality posts: 1 Private Messages blukat44
kylemittskus wrote:http://wine.woot.com/forums/viewpost.aspx?postid=5315145&pageindex=1



Thanks Kyle!

moondigger


quality posts: 11 Private Messages moondigger

Last Wooter to Woot:
moondigger

Found a friend willing to split with me. Still have to figure out where I'm going to store three bottles.

trifecta


quality posts: 66 Private Messages trifecta

I am intrigued and would be willing to take a bottle of each vintage off someones hands. Bay area folks let me know.

mmccull


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mmccull
netfortius wrote:OT- tried to order, but the services/ers seem to be down. Anybody else having this problem?



I am also having issues. The page after "buy now" does not load. I had the same issue last friday and it has not yet been resolved obviously.

mm

mvwinemaker


quality posts: 5 Private Messages mvwinemaker
moondigger wrote:I guess I risk alienating some others here on woot by saying this, but I like oak, especially in cabs and zins. But that doesn't mean I want it in every wine, and I've enjoyed Shiraz/Syrahs both ways.

I may have to get one of these and then split it with a friend.



Don't get me wrong... I like oak also, when it is supportive of the fruit, and we do use some new oak, in our single vineyard Pinot bottlings as well as the Carneros Pinot blend. It's about balance and moderation, and style, ultimately...

moondigger


quality posts: 11 Private Messages moondigger
mvwinemaker wrote:Don't get me wrong... I like oak also, when it is supportive of the fruit, and we do use some new oak, in our single vineyard Pinot bottlings as well as the Carneros Pinot blend. It's about balance and moderation, and style, ultimately...


Gotcha, and I agree. My comment about alienating some others here on woot was based on my (possibly incorrect) impression that there are a lot of wooters who dislike the characteristic oak flavors. I, for one, like the buttery/toasted oak flavors in some wines and my wife likes her Chards as oaky as she can get them.

I'm not sure how she'll react to yesterday's offering...

PemberDucky


quality posts: 39 Private Messages PemberDucky

Staff

mmccull wrote:I am also having issues. The page after "buy now" does not load. I had the same issue last friday and it has not yet been resolved obviously.



we're working on this issue. apologies for the inconvenience.


-----------------------------------------------
Not sure if you should post that? This slightly-nsfw-flowchart will help.

netfortius


quality posts: 0 Private Messages netfortius
PemberDucky wrote:we're working on this issue. apologies for the inconvenience.



please make sure you extend the time for the items supposed to expire