coynedj


quality posts: 7 Private Messages coynedj

A sample of the Hawaiian Press mysteriously showed up at my door the other day. My first reaction was what I’ve seen here this morning – fruitcake without the cake – but I figured it was worth a try. And it definitely does look much better than the picture.

The first thing I did was look at the ingredient list, and I saw coconut listed. I’m not a big fan of coconut, and I don’t eat much dried fruit – too much of it has added sugar and there aren’t any Trader Joe’s out here in South Dakota. But when I tried it, it was darn tasty – the coconut wasn’t too big a part of the mix, and the other fruits and the nuts blended together very nicely. The sweetness was just right – definitely sweet, as you would expect from fruit, but nowhere near the mouth-puckering level that too many foods have these days. And the consistency was good – not so dense that it was tough to chew, but pressed enough that there was no danger of it falling apart in my hand. The wine I had last night (second day of a sauvignon blanc) wasn’t the best pairing – this needs something more substantial, but since I’m about to go out of town I didn’t want to open another bottle and waste most of it. I see on their web site that they recommend pairing it with Humboldt Fog, and since I have some of that at home (I should have done this yesterday!) I’m going to try that combination tonight and give an updated report.

Thankfully I don't have any allergies or other conditions that would keep me from this product (my, as a friend puts it, "dumbosity" isn't a problem in this case). But, of course, if you do have such conditions this will be a no-go for you. For the rest of us, this is no low-quality convenience store product - this is good stuff, appropriate for Wine Woot.

This doesn’t impress me as a simple snack food. Given that it’s pressed together and therefore has some heft to it, it’s something to eat in small bits (and it slices very nicely). On a plate with cheeses, nibbled on along with an appropriate wine (not sauv blanc), this would be very nice.

I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff. Bob Dylan, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues

How on earth did I get 7 QPs?

dliidlii


quality posts: 33 Private Messages dliidlii
theiofgraceandi wrote:There are many different types of agave nectar and the process by which each is extracted and from where determines the glycemic index. The type of agave nectar used in these products are qualified.
Human clinical trials on Volcanic Nectar Blue Agave showed that the product is Low Glycemic in diabetics. Further, the product did not trigger Adipose tissue fat-storage in humans. This research shows that Blue Agave Nectar (at 1, 2 and 3 servings) does not trigger fat-storage in fat cells, and does not elevate blood glucose or insulin levels, which leads to obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes.
Researchers noted that not all Agave products have been clinically proven to be low glycemic, as the manufacturing process and ratios of ingredients varies, and is not standardized.
Glycemic Value of Volcanic Nectar's Blue Agave Nectar compared to other sugars and other agave nectar:

Volcanic Agave Nectar 27
Safe for Diabetics <55

One of the most health-promoting properties of agave nectar is its favorable glycemic profile. Its sweetness comes primarily from a complex form of fructose called inulin. Fructose is the sugar that occurs naturally in fruits and vegetables. The carbohydrate in agave nectar has a low glycemic index, which provides sweetness without the unpleasant "sugar rush" and unhealthful blood sugar spike caused by many other sugars. Agave nectar is a delicious natural sweetener.



So, how come you show the sodium percentage in the nutritional label but fail to display the sugar content per serving?? Sugar by any other name is still sugar.

Agave nectar consists primarily of fructose and glucose. One source gives 92% fructose and 8% glucose; another gives 56% fructose and 20% glucose. These differences probably reflect variation from one vendor of agave nectar to another.[6][7]

The impact of agave nectar on blood sugar (as measured by its glycemic index and glycemic load) is comparable to fructose,[8][9] which has a much lower glycemic index and glycemic load than table sugar (sucrose).[10][11] However, consumption of large amounts of fructose can be deleterious and can trigger fructose malabsorption, metabolic syndrome,[12] hypertriglyceridemia, decreased glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and accelerated uric acid formation

SkwerlKC


quality posts: 3 Private Messages SkwerlKC
curtisuxor wrote:The great thing about this is that it looks the same going in as it does coming out.



Oh yeah! I'm a fan of "The Big Gay Sketch Show," too.

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
theiofgraceandi wrote:There are many different types of agave nectar

And all of it is almost pure fructose.

Human clinical trials on Volcanic Nectar Blue Agave showed that the product is Low Glycemic in diabetics. Further, the product did not trigger Adipose tissue fat-storage in humans. This research shows that



Agave nectar is a problem because it is almost pure fructose, which completely aside from short term blood glucose and insulin levels promotes long term disease.

In my opinion the fact that it doesn't spike blood sugars (and therefor insulin levels) does not make up for the fact it encourages heart disease, hepatitis, and diabetes!

However the main issue here is that you can't go and label things "No Sugar Added" and then add agave nectar to it...

jhkey


quality posts: 51 Private Messages jhkey
oopsz wrote:"artisan" means "mass produced". It has no legal meaning or certification (like organic or fair trade), hence "Domino's Artisan Pizzas" or "Tostito's Artisan Chips", which is the same crap they've always sold with a fancy name and price.

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/industries/food/story/2011-10-21/food-products-christened-artisan/50896420/1



Hmm, try picking up a dictionary some time...

Artisan: : a worker who practices a trade or handicraft : craftsperson : one that produces something (as cheese or wine) in limited quantities often using traditional methods.

It does NOT mean "mass produced". however, you are correct that it's not a regulated term in the food industry so it is often misused, as in the examples you cited, but that doesn't mean that the term can not be used correctly to describe products like this.

"I double the doctor's recommendation of a glass and a half of wine a day and even treble it with a friend."
- Thomas Jefferson (CT)

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark

Oh, and ....




HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY!!!









Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
MarkDaSpark wrote:Oh, and ....



Happy VD to you too Mark! ;)

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
sqrtofneg1 wrote:Hmm...this seems contradictory.



I think it's because most people think of "refined white table sugar" when you use Sugar, aka Sucrose. So in that sense, it is not contradictory.


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

superspryte


quality posts: 21 Private Messages superspryte

Volunteer Moderator

mother wrote:Happy VD to you too Mark! ;)



Why am I amused by the abbreviation VD for Valentine's Day? Because any other day of the year it would mean venereal disease...

MarkDaSpark wrote:I think it's because most people think of "refined white table sugar" when you use Sugar, aka Sucrose. So in that sense, it is not contradictory.



This is true. Looks like we may have some diabetics feeling mislead, though theiofgraceandi certainly wasn't trying to winkle anyone. It may be prudent to mention sugar substitutes in the future with today's increased awareness.

w: 7 | t.w: 1 | h.w: 1 | tg.w: 0 | sp.w: 0 | a.w: 0 | k.w: 0 | s.w: 15 | w.w: 15 | so.w: 2

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
MarkDaSpark wrote:I think it's because most people think of "refined white table sugar" when you use Sugar, aka Sucrose. So in that sense, it is not contradictory.



So you would have no problem with Pepsi, Coke, etc. saying they were "No Sugar Added" then, huh?

Super weak argument there man...

true559


quality posts: 23 Private Messages true559

Fruit snacks and ice wine. Looks I won't spend much money here today.

Deezy2


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Deezy2
sqrtofneg1 wrote:Hmm...this seems contradictory.



Agreed! A contradiction on every level. Agave is a sweetener.. a fructose syrup masquerading as healthy. It's marketing wordplay to say 'no sugar added'.

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
theiofgraceandi wrote:There are many different types of agave nectar and the process by which each is extracted and from where determines the glycemic index. The type of agave nectar used in these products are qualified.
Human clinical trials on Volcanic Nectar Blue Agave showed that the product is Low Glycemic in diabetics. Further, the product did not trigger Adipose tissue fat-storage in humans. This research shows that Blue Agave Nectar (at 1, 2 and 3 servings) does not trigger fat-storage in fat cells, and does not elevate blood glucose or insulin levels, which leads to obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes.
Researchers noted that not all Agave products have been clinically proven to be low glycemic, as the manufacturing process and ratios of ingredients varies, and is not standardized.
Glycemic Value of Volcanic Nectar's Blue Agave Nectar compared to other sugars and other agave nectar:

Volcanic Agave Nectar 27
Safe for Diabetics <55

One of the most health-promoting properties of agave nectar is its favorable glycemic profile. Its sweetness comes primarily from a complex form of fructose called inulin. Fructose is the sugar that occurs naturally in fruits and vegetables. The carbohydrate in agave nectar has a low glycemic index, which provides sweetness without the unpleasant "sugar rush" and unhealthful blood sugar spike caused by many other sugars. Agave nectar is a delicious natural sweetener.



Thanks for popping in and responding. As you can tell, a lot of us here are very passionate about things.


Refined Sugar seems to be 50/50 glucose/fructose and has a glycemic index of 80 (pasteurized processed honey is 75, and raw honey is 35).


Do you know the FDA measurement of "Sugar" for your products? AKA the Nutrition Facts?

For example, the Wholesome Sweeteners Organic Blue Agave (non GMO) shows 16g of "Sugar" per tablespoon. Can you show us the level for your products?


It also seems to important that the Agave be processed at low heat. Do you know if the Agave you use is non GMO and uses low heat for processing?


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
superspryte wrote:Why am I amused by the abbreviation VD for Valentine's Day? Because any other day of the year it would mean venereal disease...



**whistles and tries to look innocent**

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
mother wrote:So you would have no problem with Pepsi, Coke, etc. saying they were "No Sugar Added" then, huh?

Super weak argument there man...



Happy VD to you too!


Due to the increased cost of table (refined) sugar, soft drinks started to use HFCS. So technically, yes they are adding "sugar", just not the normal "sugar" one thinks of.

It all comes down to how much Sugar is listed under the Nutritional Facts for the products.


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
mother wrote:**whistles and tries to look innocent**



Never in a million years could you pull that off!!!


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
MarkDaSpark wrote:Happy VD to you too!


Due to the increased cost of table (refined) sugar, soft drinks started to use HFCS. So technically, yes they are adding "sugar", just not the normal "sugar" one thinks of.

It all comes down to how much Sugar is listed under the Nutritional Facts for the products.



So I checked and this product would be in violation of 21CFR101.60 which states:

(2) The terms "no added sugar," "without added sugar," or "no sugar added" may be used only if:

(i) No amount of sugars, as defined in 101.9(c)(6)(ii), or any other ingredient that contains sugars that functionally substitute for added sugars is added during processing or packaging; and

(ii) The product does not contain an ingredient containing added sugars such as jam, jelly, or concentrated fruit juice; and

(iii) The sugars content has not been increased above the amount present in the ingredients by some means such as the use of enzymes, except where the intended functional effect of the process is not to increase the sugars content of a food, and a functionally insignificant increase in sugars results; and

(iv) The food that it resembles and for which it substitutes normally contains added sugars; and

(v) The product bears a statement that the food is not "low calorie" or "calorie reduced" (unless the food meets the requirements for a "low" or "reduced calorie" food) and that directs consumers' attention to the nutrition panel for further information on sugar and calorie content.



And in case you have any doubts, 101.9(c)(6)(ii) states, among other things, that

Sugars shall be defined as the sum of all free mono- and disaccharides (such as glucose, fructose, lactose, and sucrose).

ERMD


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ERMD

As with others, this magically appeared monday at my door. I opened to find as some have said a "fruit cake". Let me start out by saying this is no fruitcake.If you like dried fruit and nuts, this is it. It is an amazing product with a natural feel. It is a Great way to get away from the store brand "lava" fruit bars.It has nice texture balance between the leathery dried fruit on top and bottom and the mixture in between.
First tried with a manchago (wife can only have goat/sheep cheese)and this was to strong and overpowering. next went with a goat brie and BAM! we have a winner.A for wine, Cab went ok, but the Tablas Creek white Esprit was fantastic.
Would I buy this? If you plan to have a wine get together and want to impress yourself and friends,
then yes.
I will order after I post this.

ERMD


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ERMD

First Sucker:
Ponderoyn

Last Wooter to Woot:
ERMD

stillhavemyteeth


quality posts: 0 Private Messages stillhavemyteeth

call it what you want - its still a freekin' fruitcake!

ERMD


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ERMD
stillhavemyteeth wrote:call it what you want - its still a freekin' fruitcake!


Thats like saying Boones farm and Caymus are the same...both wine

Not true, this is a GOURMET food, not a 7-11 fruit bar.


coynedj


quality posts: 7 Private Messages coynedj
ERMD wrote:Thats like saying Boones farm and Caymus are the same...both wine

Not true, this is a GOURMET food, not a 7-11 fruit bar.



This ain't no fruitcake. ERMD is correct - sugar arguments aside, this is good stuff.

I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff. Bob Dylan, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues

How on earth did I get 7 QPs?

xtricks


quality posts: 0 Private Messages xtricks
sqrtofneg1 wrote:Hmm...this seems contradictory.



Agave nectar is not technically defined as sugar, as the FDA or whoever defines sugar as beet or cane sugar (and maybe high fructose corn syrup??). Agave nectar is a 'sweetener' and food makers can advertise as no sugar, sugar free, etc and still be packing in the glucose/fructose/etc extra not terribly good for you sweeteners.

Thing about this stuff ...if you have a cuisinart at home, you can make something very similar with all your own ingredient choices.

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
xtricks wrote:Agave nectar is not technically defined as sugar, as the FDA or whoever defines sugar as beet or cane sugar (and maybe high fructose corn syrup??). Agave nectar is a 'sweetener' and food makers can advertise as no sugar, sugar free, etc and still be packing in the glucose/fructose/etc extra not terribly good for you sweeteners.

Thing about this stuff ...if you have a cuisinart at home, you can make something very similar with all your own ingredient choices.



I actually posted the relevant statute above, and you are mistaken.

To make it easy, I'll repeat the part where they define exactly what sugar means:

Sugars shall be defined as the sum of all free mono- and disaccharides (such as glucose, fructose, lactose, and sucrose).

fredrinaldi


quality posts: 34 Private Messages fredrinaldi
curtisuxor wrote:The great thing about this is that it looks the same going in as it does coming out.


Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh noooooooooooo, you didn't really say that, did you?
hey TT is that a quality post ? lol

chardonay


quality posts: 29 Private Messages chardonay

I feel bad that, these are probably made in a small place by a married couple that are so proud of what they make, and we are just hammering them... well I feel bad, but I still don't want one.. this is everything I dislike.. dried fruit and nuts.. I want my fruit consumption in a glass, blended with tequila

What Contemptible Scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch??

pitamuffin


quality posts: 12 Private Messages pitamuffin

I saw the picture and was wondering why winewoot was selling bird seed cakes.

fredrinaldi


quality posts: 34 Private Messages fredrinaldi

tough crowd today, and on Balintines Day to boot.

alliemda


quality posts: 4 Private Messages alliemda

Because I *must* add to the sugar/agave discussion, please note that the ONE poster who noted "good" things about agave appears to be a representative of Grace&I, the manufacturer of this product.
IMO - diabetics and others sensitive to sugar, tread carefully. I wouldn't risk my blood sugar levels because "theiofgraceandi" says that "One of the most health-promoting properties of agave nectar is its favorable glycemic profile".
In the very same post, there is a CYA statement:
"Researchers noted that not all Agave products have been clinically proven to be low glycemic, as the manufacturing process and ratios of ingredients varies, and is not standardized".
These two things do not seem to go together...
Of course agave is not the only thing to be wary of - the sugars in fruit must also be accounted for. Dried fruit in particular can throw people off because the sugars are in a concentrated state. So even if you are ok with the agave, don't assume that this is something your diabetic friend can eat.
Sorry for any repeats of other comments.
I'm lucky not to have a problem with the sugar, but sulfured fruit makes my asthma act up...boo.

trifecta


quality posts: 72 Private Messages trifecta

I realize the "No added sugar" has started this....

Seems to me if you are sensitive to the sugar levels, check it yourself. This stuff isn't coming up on the caramels, toffee, etc...

I for one really liked this product and others who have tried it did to. If you have sugar issues, lean back and make your own decision.

I am so tempted to stock up on this for backpacking trips.... what a treat on day 3 this would be. The recent package I had said it was good until July.

What is the typical shelf life for these? If it were closer to summer I think I would be buying the limit.

theiofgraceandi


quality posts: 3 Private Messages theiofgraceandi
pamtha wrote:So maybe I am not classy enough. How are these consumed? Fork & knife into bites like cake, or just pry chunks off with my fingers like nachos?

I assumed just picking the block up and gnawing was right out.

I'm baffled.



Best served cold, paired with your favorite cheeses or inbetween sips of wine! Slice like a loaf of bread with a very sharp knife. Comes on it's own cutting board so can be used anywhere....pretty much!

theiofgraceandi


quality posts: 3 Private Messages theiofgraceandi
coynedj wrote:A sample of the Hawaiian Press mysteriously showed up at my door the other day. My first reaction was what I’ve seen here this morning – fruitcake without the cake – but I figured it was worth a try. And it definitely does look much better than the picture.

The first thing I did was look at the ingredient list, and I saw coconut listed. I’m not a big fan of coconut, and I don’t eat much dried fruit – too much of it has added sugar and there aren’t any Trader Joe’s out here in South Dakota. But when I tried it, it was darn tasty – the coconut wasn’t too big a part of the mix, and the other fruits and the nuts blended together very nicely. The sweetness was just right – definitely sweet, as you would expect from fruit, but nowhere near the mouth-puckering level that too many foods have these days. And the consistency was good – not so dense that it was tough to chew, but pressed enough that there was no danger of it falling apart in my hand. The wine I had last night (second day of a sauvignon blanc) wasn’t the best pairing – this needs something more substantial, but since I’m about to go out of town I didn’t want to open another bottle and waste most of it. I see on their web site that they recommend pairing it with Humboldt Fog, and since I have some of that at home (I should have done this yesterday!) I’m going to try that combination tonight and give an updated report.

Thankfully I don't have any allergies or other conditions that would keep me from this product (my, as a friend puts it, "dumbosity" isn't a problem in this case). But, of course, if you do have such conditions this will be a no-go for you. For the rest of us, this is no low-quality convenience store product - this is good stuff, appropriate for Wine Woot.

This doesn’t impress me as a simple snack food. Given that it’s pressed together and therefore has some heft to it, it’s something to eat in small bits (and it slices very nicely). On a plate with cheeses, nibbled on along with an appropriate wine (not sauv blanc), this would be very nice.



Hi, I'm Mina, one of the founders of Grace&i and I wanted to Thank you so very much for sharing your high regard for the Hawaiian Press! I am so delighted that you have enjoyed it and I'm excited to check out your feedback after the Humboldt Fog pairing!

theiofgraceandi


quality posts: 3 Private Messages theiofgraceandi
dliidlii wrote:So, how come you show the sodium percentage in the nutritional label but fail to display the sugar content per serving?? Sugar by any other name is still sugar.

Agave nectar consists primarily of fructose and glucose. One source gives 92% fructose and 8% glucose; another gives 56% fructose and 20% glucose. These differences probably reflect variation from one vendor of agave nectar to another.[6][7]

The impact of agave nectar on blood sugar (as measured by its glycemic index and glycemic load) is comparable to fructose,[8][9] which has a much lower glycemic index and glycemic load than table sugar (sucrose).[10][11] However, consumption of large amounts of fructose can be deleterious and can trigger fructose malabsorption, metabolic syndrome,[12] hypertriglyceridemia, decreased glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and accelerated uric acid formation




My sincere apologies, when I listed the nutritional info, I listed the summary of carbohydrate content and did not specify how much was derived from sugars (Sugar content is 9g per serving). I thought that the labels were going to posted and not sure what happened there.
Thank you for sharing your inquiry.

theiofgraceandi


quality posts: 3 Private Messages theiofgraceandi
trifecta wrote:I realize the "No added sugar" has started this....

Seems to me if you are sensitive to the sugar levels, check it yourself. This stuff isn't coming up on the caramels, toffee, etc...

I for one really liked this product and others who have tried it did to. If you have sugar issues, lean back and make your own decision.

I am so tempted to stock up on this for backpacking trips.... what a treat on day 3 this would be. The recent package I had said it was good until July.

What is the typical shelf life for these? If it were closer to summer I think I would be buying the limit.



Hi, I'm Mina, one of the founders of Grace&i. So delighted to know you got a chance to try the Presses and enjoyed them! The shelf life is 6-months (kept refrigerated). Although, if you ask my grandmother, she would probably tell you it last for years.... but, I wouldn't necessarily advise that!

rjquillin


quality posts: 171 Private Messages rjquillin
mother wrote:

We've not met, but I like you already, you do honest research.

CT

mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
trifecta wrote:I realize the "No added sugar" has started this....

EDIT:

Let's simply state that what is at issue here is the misleading label of "No sugar added". This has nothing to do with any other products, no matter how much sugar they contain, that weren't misleading labelled.

I should never have brought up the issue of Agave being a bad form of sugar.

chipgreen


quality posts: 186 Private Messages chipgreen

Is that a state law or a federal law?

Is Organicville also breaking the law? Is the wine.woot product forum a proper venue for interpreting the law as it regards food labels?

debegone


quality posts: 0 Private Messages debegone

I also got to try some of the Hawaiian press this week. I think that is very beautiful (the top looks like a flower) and would really bring a cheese tray up a notch in elegance. I tried it on its own, without paring it with wine or cheese, by slicing off a small piece with a sharp knife. I happen to love dried fruits and nuts so I really enjoyed it, but it was a little too sweet for me for just a snack on its own. I can see how paired with cheese to cut the sweetness a bit would work really well. It’s a quality well made and beautiful product.

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
theiofgraceandi wrote:My sincere apologies, when I listed the nutritional info, I listed the summary of carbohydrate content and did not specify how much was derived from sugars (Sugar content is 9g per serving). I thought that the labels were going to posted and not sure what happened there.
Thank you for sharing your inquiry.



Thanks for coming back and telling us.


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316

So I'm a visual person, and it is very hard to visualize something that is 12oz, especially since it is a dense fruit and nut 'loaf'. Any chance you could provide the HxWxL measurement in inches for us visual folks?

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013