WootBot


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Screwy Wines

We're not scared of a little controversy. And oh, do we know we're facing one today. But don't fall for propaganda from The Cork Popper's League and start thinking that screwcaps are low class. Does drinking the wrong wine turn Downton Abbey into Two And A Half Men? Of course not! Don't judge a wine by the bottle is what we're saying.



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Cesare


quality posts: 1611 Private Messages Cesare

Screwy Wines

Vines on the Marycrest 'Round Midnight Red 4-Pack
$64.99 (Normally $119.55) 46% off List Price
2007 'Round Midnight Red

Poizin - The Wine to Die for! 4-Pack
$69.99 (Normally $107.90) 35% off List Price
2011 Poizin Zinfandel, Dry Creek Valley, Sonoma

2008 Argento Chardonnay Mendoza, Argentina 6-Pack
$59.99 (Normally $113.20) 47% off List Price
2008 Argento Chardonnay, Argentina

Lang Wines Amador County Barbera/Syrah/Zinfandel Mix 6-Pack
$69.99 (Normally $128.11) 45% off List Price
2008 Barbera, Amador County, Oakmont Vineyards
2007 Lang Wines Syrah
2010 Lang Wine Zinfandel, Amador County

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
neilfindswine wrote:Here are four wine offers for which a screwtop was the closure of choice. Let the screwtop debate commence.


Well, I'm okay with screwtops from the wines I've tried so far with them (yes they were all from woot). I do look to all of you for guidance in those matters, though.

I'm just hanging out, really.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus

Screw top closure study. Put as much stake in it as you'd like.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

kmashaney


quality posts: 4 Private Messages kmashaney
kylemittskus wrote:Screw top closure study. Put as much stake in it as you'd like.



I loved reading that! What an interesting study. Maybe people would be less snobby if they saw that?

vinesonthemarycrest


quality posts: 12 Private Messages vinesonthemarycrest

Hello. Victor Abascal owner and winemaker at VOTM here. We close ALL our wines under screw cap! We believe caps preserve wine better than cork. Spoilage is almost nil and wines age more slowly. We are offering '07 'Round Midnight a fruity yet savory GSM based in Syrah which is aging perfectly. Cheers!

Victor & Jennifer Abascal
Vines on the Marycrest
www.vinesonthemarycrest.com

Making wine the old fashioned way since 2005.

tercerowines


quality posts: 36 Private Messages tercerowines

I will be the first to say that there is not a 'perfect' closure for wines - period - and I really don't think anyone can object to that.

Wines stored under cork 'can' age for decades and still be wonderful - OR they can be ruined within days of bottling due to a bad cork. And here's the bummer - you wouldn't know it was 'bad due to the cork' until you opened it, whenever that would be . . . and the winery wouldn't know it was bad when they put the cork into it, because you can't look at a cork and know that it's 'good' or not just by sight.

I look at myself as a consumer first and foremost, and as a winemaker second. I want to be able to know that the wines I produce are going to get into your hands and not be adversely affected by variables that I can control - and closures are one of them. Is the screw cap the perfect closure? Again, there is not perfect closure - wines can still 'go bad' under screwcaps due to things like microfissures that can happen when too much pressure if placed on top of the bottle (and I'm talking pallets and pallets of wine here, folks); bottles can get 'nicked' badly and these dents can lead to small holes; etc . . .

I would not and do not hesitate one second purchasing wines under screwcap for both immediate enjoyment and for laying down as long as I'd like to . . . and if I were you, I wouldn't worry either.

Good wine is good wine - regardless of how it is bottled . . . Now a screw cap will not make a bad wine taste better (-: - but lucky for you, these offers are all for GREAT wines at fantastic prices!

I cannot talk more highly of the wines that Victor makes, for example - just beautifully balanced wines that are enjoyable on their own or with food . . .

Off the soapbox . . . for now!

Cheers

Larry Schaffer
tercero wines
www.tercerowines.com
larry@tercerowines.com

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
tercerowines wrote:I will be the first to say that there is not a 'perfect' closure for wines - period - and I really don't think anyone can object to that.

Wines stored under cork 'can' age for decades and still be wonderful - OR they can be ruined within days of bottling due to a bad cork. And here's the bummer - you wouldn't know it was 'bad due to the cork' until you opened it, whenever that would be . . . and the winery wouldn't know it was bad when they put the cork into it, because you can't look at a cork and know that it's 'good' or not just by sight.

I look at myself as a consumer first and foremost, and as a winemaker second. I want to be able to know that the wines I produce are going to get into your hands and not be adversely affected by variables that I can control - and closures are one of them. Is the screw cap the perfect closure? Again, there is not perfect closure - wines can still 'go bad' under screwcaps due to things like microfissures that can happen when too much pressure if placed on top of the bottle (and I'm talking pallets and pallets of wine here, folks); bottles can get 'nicked' badly and these dents can lead to small holes; etc . . .

I would not and do not hesitate one second purchasing wines under screwcap for both immediate enjoyment and for laying down as long as I'd like to . . . and if I were you, I wouldn't worry either.

Good wine is good wine - regardless of how it is bottled . . . Now a screw cap will not make a bad wine taste better (-: - but lucky for you, these offers are all for GREAT wines at fantastic prices!

I cannot talk more highly of the wines that Victor makes, for example - just beautifully balanced wines that are enjoyable on their own or with food . . .

Off the soapbox . . . for now!

Cheers



So how did woot manage to have this sale without including some of your wines? I believe you have been cork-free for a couple years now, right?

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

tercerowines


quality posts: 36 Private Messages tercerowines
North316 wrote:So how did woot manage to have this sale without including some of your wines? I believe you have been cork-free for a couple years now, right?



Before the woot folks come on here, I'll let you know that they DO want my wines - and I'm sure you'll see them again shortly . . . .

And yes, I've been using screwcaps since I started my label with my 06 vintage - and have been very happy with the results and how the wines have aged . . .

Watch for something from me on woot plus in the coming months (-:

Cheers!

Larry Schaffer
tercero wines
www.tercerowines.com
larry@tercerowines.com

neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

tercerowines wrote:Before the woot folks come on here, I'll let you know that they DO want my wines - and I'm sure you'll see them again shortly . . . .

And yes, I've been using screwcaps since I started my label with my 06 vintage - and have been very happy with the results and how the wines have aged . . .

Watch for something from me on woot plus in the coming months (-:

Cheers!



....staring at my phone... waiting on the alter... crying myself to sleep each night, empty wine glass in hand... looking forward to it Larry!

...and we have 4 fantastic offers up here, all with the beloved screwtop. Thanks to Victor/Vines on the Marycrest for stopping by, and as always welcome to Lang, Argento and Poizin!

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

tercerowines


quality posts: 36 Private Messages tercerowines
neilfindswine wrote:....staring at my phone... waiting on the alter... crying myself to sleep each night, empty wine glass in hand...



Dude, not sure you're wine glass is ever 'empty' my friend (-:

We WILL make this happen - sooner rather than later!!!

Cheers!

Larry Schaffer
tercero wines
www.tercerowines.com
larry@tercerowines.com

neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

tercerowines wrote:Dude, not sure you're wine glass is ever 'empty' my friend (-:



Yeah, good point.

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

tercerowines


quality posts: 36 Private Messages tercerowines
kylemittskus wrote:Are you offering a deal(s) on Berserker Day?



Email sent, my friend . . .

Larry Schaffer
tercero wines
www.tercerowines.com
larry@tercerowines.com

michaelvella


quality posts: 12 Private Messages michaelvella
kylemittskus wrote:Screw top closure study. Put as much stake in it as you'd like.



Very cool. I will say this, I actively will choose a wine with a screw cap over a cork if I'm browsing around in a store for something I've not had.
Often I will not even consider wines with corks.

michugana


quality posts: 0 Private Messages michugana

I'm in. Barberas are fantastic and maybe my favorite varietal. Plus it's a mixed pack? For only 12.50/bottle? Yeah. I'll take that.


Speed to First Woot:
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First Sucker:
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Last Wooter to Woot:
michugana

ashram101


quality posts: 3 Private Messages ashram101
michugana wrote:I'm in. Barberas are fantastic and maybe my favorite varietal. Plus it's a mixed pack? For only 12.50/bottle? Yeah. I'll take that.



That's what I'm talking about. In for 2. Time to add another rack in the cellar.

markmckenna


quality posts: 5 Private Messages markmckenna

I like the comment about being a consumer first and a winemaker second. If you truly care bout your wines screwcap is one of the only ways to go. Corked wines should be a thing of the past. At Lang Wines we want every bottle to be a great experience. That is why we switched to screwcap years ago. We have seen not only an elimination of flawed bottles but they are wearing their age beautifully.

xavier1421


quality posts: 0 Private Messages xavier1421

Anyone know what the "corkscrew shaped surprise" is with the PoiZin? I doubt I'll make the 140 purchase window, but I am curious!

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus
xavier1421 wrote:Anyone know what the "corkscrew shaped surprise" is with the PoiZin? I doubt I'll make the 140 purchase window, but I am curious!



I'm guessing it's a corkscrew.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

markmckenna wrote:I like the comment about being a consumer first and a winemaker second. If you truly care bout your wines screwcap is one of the only ways to go. Corked wines should be a thing of the past. At Lang Wines we want every bottle to be a great experience. That is why we switched to screwcap years ago. We have seen not only an elimination of flawed bottles but they are wearing their age beautifully.



Thanks for stopping by Mark! Proper introduction- Mark McKenna is the winemaker for Lang Wines, and he does a fantastic job! He's also the one who introduced me to Bob Lang and suggested we discuss featuring Lang Wines on Woot... And the rest is history!

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

hiten900


quality posts: 10 Private Messages hiten900
neilfindswine wrote:Thanks for stopping by Mark! Proper introduction- Mark McKenna is the winemaker for Lang Wines, and he does a fantastic job! He's also the one who introduced me to Bob Lang and suggested we discuss featuring Lang Wines on Woot... And the rest is history!



Mark,
I am delighted with Lang wines. You and your team do a very fine job. My wife, who likes good wine, and can be lovingly described as strong and silent, also expressed joy.

I don't much care about the closure, as long as the wine is good. A very large part of the world is screwtops, and such large winery user base must mean that this can't be a bad practice.

rugrats2001


quality posts: 14 Private Messages rugrats2001
kylemittskus wrote:I'm guessing it's a corkscrew.



Correction - it WAS a corkscrew, back when this was offered in October. I would be very suprised if any where included in this offer.

That said, I enjoyed receiving mine! It was printed with the PoiZin logo.

langwine


quality posts: 7 Private Messages langwine
markmckenna wrote:I like the comment about being a consumer first and a winemaker second. If you truly care bout your wines screwcap is one of the only ways to go. Corked wines should be a thing of the past. At Lang Wines we want every bottle to be a great experience. That is why we switched to screwcap years ago. We have seen not only an elimination of flawed bottles but they are wearing their age beautifully.



Thanks, Mark! Failed corks and the taint of 'corked wines' historically make some 5% to 7% of all such bottled wines unpalatable, an unacceptable failure rate that should have made cork closures obsolete a hundred or more years ago. But the ceremony, history and tradition associated with wine 'service' can be as overpowering as the mandates of English history and English society are to the characters and life portrayed in PBS's Downton Abbey. The history of wine goes back 6000-years! The earliest wines were drunk 'fresh' to avoid the inevitability of spoiled wine. The Egyptians used clay amphorae closed with cloth, leather and morter in an attempt to save the wines for future enjoyment. The Greeks floated olive oil on top of their wines to keep air away from the liquid surface. They also began using pine-pitch to seal the amphorae for long trips to distant markets by sea. (Those of us who have tasted Greek 'Retsina' likely understand the adverse qualities of pine tar as a wine closure). Cork has been the closure of choice since the days of the Roman Empire. The one thing that all wine closures throughout history share in common is that their sole purpose is to deliver a better product to the consumer. Witout any doubt what-so-ever, that superior closure today is a screw-cap.

-Bob Lang, Lang Wines

chipgreen


quality posts: 187 Private Messages chipgreen

I just tried Retsina for the first time last weekend. It must be an acquired taste!

greyday


quality posts: 52 Private Messages greyday

Thanks for the history lesson, Bob (and for coming on here)! It's a perfect source, as I bought a barbera vertical from Lang last year that had this exact problem--the corks were breaking down on the two corked years, while the screwtop one was fresh and quite good (the bad corks weren't a problem as I drank them and the wine itself, once decanted and away from the vinegar-smelling necks, was totally fine, but had I stored them for a long period of time, probably wouldn't have held up the way a screwtop would).

There's a lot of speculation on the long term aging of screwtops; my personal opinion is that most wines will probably last longer, but take much longer to mature (I have nothing to back this up other than impressions left on me by articles I've read and bottles I've drunk). Short term, however, I've seen a lot of screwtop wines that were "drink now" when I bought them outlast the normal period of time that they really should have. So from what I've gathered (and this enters into my decision making when I'm bottling anything I plan to age [amateur winemaker]), it's really up to personal taste and what you want the wine to do/how long you want it to last.

Note again that that is all opinion. I think it'll be a few years/decades before we really have a firm grasp on rubber/plastic cork, screwtop, zork closures, etc. But either way it says nothing at all in either direction about the quality of the wine, a stigma that every year becomes less and less prevalent (due mostly to more mid and higher end wineries beginning to use alternate capping)...

michugana


quality posts: 0 Private Messages michugana
langwine wrote:Thanks, Mark! Failed corks and the taint of 'corked wines' historically make some 5% to 7% of all such bottled wines unpalatable, an unacceptable failure rate that should have made cork closures obsolete a hundred or more years ago. But the ceremony, history and tradition associated with wine 'service' can be as overpowering as the mandates of English history and English society are to the characters and life portrayed in PBS's Downton Abbey. The history of wine goes back 6000-years! The earliest wines were drunk 'fresh' to avoid the inevitability of spoiled wine. The Egyptians used clay amphorae closed with cloth, leather and morter in an attempt to save the wines for future enjoyment. The Greeks floated olive oil on top of their wines to keep air away from the liquid surface. They also began using pine-pitch to seal the amphorae for long trips to distant markets by sea. (Those of us who have tasted Greek 'Retsina' likely understand the adverse qualities of pine tar as a wine closure). Cork has been the closure of choice since the days of the Roman Empire. The one thing that all wine closures throughout history share in common is that their sole purpose is to deliver a better product to the consumer. Witout any doubt what-so-ever, that superior closure today is a screw-cap.

-Bob Lang, Lang Wines



What a fantastic post and I look forward to trying out Lang Wines. You should seriously write and article, Bob. I copied this post to my Facebook page (giving you credit of course) so that I can open the eyes of some of my friends. Thank you!

ajrod27


quality posts: 41 Private Messages ajrod27

2008 Argento Chardonnay:
I have brief tasting notes from the Hallowoot tasting in October. This wine has a citrus, pineapple, pear and oak profile; more citrus on the nose than on the palate. It's not an oak monster but the oak is definitely there. It does have a fair amount of acidity but not what I would consider 'crisp'.

abatt


quality posts: 2 Private Messages abatt
michugana wrote:I'm in. Barberas are fantastic and maybe my favorite varietal. Plus it's a mixed pack? For only 12.50/bottle? Yeah. I'll take that.


Speed to First Woot:
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First Sucker:
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I'll second that. The Barbera was great and went well with both Italian sausage based sauce and bar-b-que.

krobart


quality posts: 0 Private Messages krobart
michugana wrote:I'm in. Barberas are fantastic and maybe my favorite varietal. Plus it's a mixed pack? For only 12.50/bottle? Yeah. I'll take that.


Speed to First Woot:
53m 9.339s
First Sucker:
kathyj100
Last Wooter to Woot:
michugana



Haven't tried a Barbares yet. In for the Lang just for that.

michugana


quality posts: 0 Private Messages michugana
markmckenna wrote:I like the comment about being a consumer first and a winemaker second. If you truly care bout your wines screwcap is one of the only ways to go. Corked wines should be a thing of the past. At Lang Wines we want every bottle to be a great experience. That is why we switched to screwcap years ago. We have seen not only an elimination of flawed bottles but they are wearing their age beautifully.



Mark, can you provide the optimal drinking window for the 3 Lang Wines in the offer?

threemoons


quality posts: 18 Private Messages threemoons

Oy, such temptation. Me=broke, but I so want more PoiZin.

Also, the Lang blend was fantastic when I had that, I say it's the best bang for the buck of this deal.

langwine


quality posts: 7 Private Messages langwine
chipgreen wrote:I just tried Retsina for the first time last weekend. It must be an acquired taste!



Retsina has an aroma reminiscent of the the turpentine based products we once used when attempting to clean old dried paint-brushes (but it is bottled with cork closures).

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman
ajrod27 wrote:2008 Argento Chardonnay:
I have brief tasting notes from the Hallowoot tasting in October. This wine has a citrus, pineapple, pear and oak profile; more citrus on the nose than on the palate. It's not an oak monster but the oak is definitely there. It does have a fair amount of acidity but not what I would consider 'crisp'.



Glad I checked in - I forgot we tried that one! My notes are fairly similar to ajrod's: Initially aromas are primarily oak with a good bit of (surprising) grass. Impression on the palate was subtle oak and smoke with some citrus to round it out. The finish was long, started clean and then turned to smoky toward the end. The final analysis says that this is a somewhat oaky but not overly oaky wine. It's not crisp, as ajrod mentioned, but it's got a nice sense of balance about it if you like that style.

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 173 Private Messages rjquillin
langwine wrote:Thanks, Mark! Failed corks and the taint of 'corked wines' historically make some 5% to 7% of all such bottled wines unpalatable, an unacceptable failure rate that should have made cork closures obsolete a hundred or more years ago. [snip] The one thing that all wine closures throughout history share in common is that their sole purpose is to deliver a better product to the consumer. Witout any doubt what-so-ever, that superior closure today is a screw-cap.

-Bob Lang, Lang Wines


I too am curious how these will age. From what I've read, some do have transfer characteristics similar to cork, without the possible taint. I've got a number of 'good' bottles I'll be interested in tasting some number of years in the future.
Currently have 38 Lang in the cellar, but they are incrementing down. So far, have enjoyed them all.
Thanks for joining in here Bob.

Enjoying a screwy top 2010 Ranchero Cellars Viognier, La Vista Vineyard, Paso Robles as I browse.

CT

neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

rjquillin wrote:
Enjoying a screwy top 2010 Ranchero Cellars Viognier, La Vista Vineyard, Paso Robles as I browse.



...nice screwy wine, that Vio....

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neilfindswine


quality posts: 170 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

...the Lang.. she's a blinkin'. This is likely the last of the Lang Syrah....

I report to winedavid39...
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vagabondh


quality posts: 0 Private Messages vagabondh
kylemittskus wrote:Screw top closure study. Put as much stake in it as you'd like.



EXCELLENT ARTICLE! As we all sit here in front of computers and text on cellular smart phones, it's about time we recognize that modern methods of closure just might be superior! I was given a variety case of "independent winemakers" wines, most (all?) had screw tops and so far they've all been very good wines.