WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: What do you want to ask US about wine?
  • 7.1% - At last! See you in the comments. 60
  • 92.9% - I don’t want to ask you anything. Stay away from me, you deviant. 788
848 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

gholt121


quality posts: 3 Private Messages gholt121

I'd like to see the wine broken up into small quantities. Sometimes, I just want ONE bottle. Can you, Woot!, do that??



Proud Woot!er since 2005.

computermd82


quality posts: 32 Private Messages computermd82
gholt121 wrote:I'd like to see the wine broken up into small quantities. Sometimes, I just want ONE bottle. Can you, Woot!, do that??



You beat me to it. I'd like to buy wine, but six bottles worth? I know sometimes it's less, but we're only one couple, half of which doesn't drink alcohol!

Even if there's an extra shipping charge I wouldn't mind, I'd love to buy single bottles!

So the question is.. Woot, would you consider selling single bottles to us, your loyal minions?

V'Owl Birthday of Celebrations GIVEAWAY!!!!
"And the man in the rain picked up his bag of secrets, and journeyed up the mountainside, far above the clouds. And nothing was ever heard from him again, except for the sound of Tubular Bells."

curtisuxor


quality posts: 56 Private Messages curtisuxor

They sell multiple bottles to give you a better discount per bottle. I assume they have a smaller profit per bottle as the packs get larger.

Would you really spend $5 to ship one bottle of wine?

As for my Q: Do wines really have a "dumb age"? Or is this something invented by wine sellers to encourage people to drink more, faster? Has anyone really tasted a wine when it was "dumb" and when it was (I assume the alternative is) "smart"?

If that really does exist, I don't understand how a wine could ever recover from that in a closed bottle.

goddess8681


quality posts: 1 Private Messages goddess8681

Would you let us have the option of how many bottles we may purchase, starting with say 2? And increase by 2's? Something so there is a way to "try" the wine, instead of investing in something I may hate. I am certainly not a wine aficionado, but I do enjoy trying new types or vintages.

ardubu


quality posts: 8 Private Messages ardubu

I'd like to ask the US, Why did we go off the Gold Standard? Is there any gold left in Ft. Knox? Can I borrow some?

Ah, the hell with it.

ardubu


quality posts: 8 Private Messages ardubu

Oh, about wine!
Maybe we should be on the Wine Standard, after all the US makes some of the best wine in the world, yes?

Ah, the hell with it.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
curtisuxor wrote:As for my Q: Do wines really have a "dumb age"? Or is this something invented by wine sellers to encourage people to drink more, faster? Has anyone really tasted a wine when it was "dumb" and when it was (I assume the alternative is) "smart"?

If that really does exist, I don't understand how a wine could ever recover from that in a closed bottle.



1. Yes, it really exists for some wines. It is primarily a phenomenon in red wines made in traditional styles that (are intended to) age well.

2. The wine with which the description 'dumb' phase or 'asleep' is most closely associated is Cabernet Sauvignon.

3. In Europe, traditionally made serious red wines - with the possible exception of Burgundy - were very tannic in their youth and not particularly pleasant to drink. This was particularly true in Bordeaux, the Northern Rhone (Hermitage; Cotes Rotie) and Piedmont (Barolo) - the wines which have been considered the great reds for the past 300 years, at least. Because the grapes often barely ripened, it was atypical to find the sort of fresh fruit flavors that are characteristic and readily available to winemakers (who don't let the grapes hang too long) in sunnier climes. One did not speak of a dumb phase with these wines because they were usually not enjoyable before they were 7-8 in most fair-to-good years, or before 10 or more in very good to great years, when the bottle aromas - known as bouquet - began to emerge and the tannins softened. Those who drank such wines knew this and it was one of the reasons the wealthy built the great cellars of legend where you were essentially drinking wine laid down by your grandfather or father, and buying wine for your children and grandchildren.

4. In California (and now places like Australia), the climate permits the grapes to ripen well (almost) every year. The result was that even wines made in a traditional style from grapes used in Europe to make age worthy wines would have far more fruit aromas and flavors in their youth, even though were still tannic. Hence, Cabernet (primarily) made in California was a far, far, more enjoyable wine at the age of 4-5 than a Bordeaux of equivalent quality grapes.

5. Although before Prohibition there were significant efforts by wineries to hold red wines back for aging, and to release them at 8-10 when they were mature by traditional standards, a sad combination of the San Francisco earthquake and fire in 1906 (over 1 million gallons lost and another millon+ gallons used to fight the fire) then Prohibition depleted the stocks of aging wine and prevented the accumulation of new stocks for aging. After Prohibition, another bad combination of high demand for wine and a punitive tax regime conspired to make it uneconomic for all wineries to hold wines for 8-10 years of aging.

6. Because the wines had fruit flavors and aromas, wineries could release Cabernet at 4-5 and they would be enjoyable to drink on release.

7. However, the cycle of wine in the bottle transitioning from fruit flavors and aromas to bottle bouquet and the softening of tannins still took (and takes) place.

8. Wine drinkers who did not have experience with high quality aged European wines noticed that the wines seemed to get dull a few years after release as that process took place. Those drinkers just assumed the wines didn't age well. Most wineries were perfectly happy not to say anything because they needed to sell wine every year. (Same reason people used to say every year was a good year in California....). Really knowledgeable wine drinkers were content with the general ignorance because it kept the prices for really great, age worthy Cabernet (of which there wasn't a lot) very low. (In the mid-1960s, you could by Beaulieu Georges de Latour Private Reserve Cabernet for $1.50 a bottle, less in case quantity.

9. Even today, with the popularity of the International Style, traditionally made red wines will go through a phase during which the fruit flavors and aromas fade to a degree (not all that much in great years - you can still smell fresh fruit aromas in the best 1970 Cabernets), bottle bouquet develops and the tannins soften over time.

10. Based on 55-odd years drinking serious Cabernet, my rule of thumb is that I don't touch decent Cabernet before it's 10. The 'dumb' phase usually lasts from age 5-6 through 8-10, depending on the year, the style of the winemaking, and the handling of the aging process in the winery (type of wood, length of time, etc.). But, I learned to drink wines of the traditional style and prefer them aged. If I want younger, fresh-tasting wines, I drink varietals that are more known to be drinkable in youth, and - sometimes - are more enjoyable as young wines than as aged wines. Often the case with Zinfandel, depending on vinification.

Hope this helps.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

rjquillin


quality posts: 189 Private Messages rjquillin
rpm wrote:
Hope this helps.


RPM,

When are you going to write the book?

CT

StarM


quality posts: 20 Private Messages StarM

[quote postid="5235239" user=rpm]

10. Based on 55-odd years drinking serious Cabernet, my rule of thumb is that I don't touch decent Cabernet before it's 10. The 'dumb' phase usually lasts from age 5-6 through 8-10, depending on the year, the style of the winemaking, and the handling of the aging process in the winery (type of wood, length of time, etc.). But, I learned to drink wines of the traditional style and prefer them aged. If I want younger, fresh-tasting wines, I drink varietals that are more known to be drinkable in youth, and - sometimes - are more enjoyable as young wines than as aged wines. Often the case with Zinfandel, depending on vinification.

Hope this helps.[/quote]

RPM -- Thanks for shaing your knowledge and yet another great explanation -- love the history & context. This is why wine is more than just a drink, it truly is a quest.

Cheers!

"We hear of the conversion of water into wine at the marriage in Cana as of a miracle. But this conversion is, through the goodness of God, made every day before our eyes. Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards, and which incorporates itself with the grapes, to be changed into wine; a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy." Benjamin Franklin

Ap13fish


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Ap13fish

When can WineWoot! ship wine to the little state of Rhode Island?

kutiel


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kutiel
Ap13fish wrote:When can WineWoot! ship wine to the little state of Rhode Island?



Don't do it woot!

Jk! <3

I really wish I could get just one bottle, but I get why I can't. Just means I have a lot of them hidden in my basement.

rageje


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rageje

Why is wine so difficult.

Beer is easy to understand. There are just a few major categories (e.g., lager, IPAs) and once you have tasted one from each, you have a general idea what they are about (what does hoppy mean).

I guess if it was easy anyone could be a wine snob. I guess I'll stop wining now.

PUfelix85


quality posts: 2 Private Messages PUfelix85

Q: Why does the bottle not refill itself?

x8

blondegordon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages blondegordon

I don't understand why anyone would want to pay shipping for just one bottle of wine.
Also, if you've ordered from winewoot you know it takes about 3 weeks to arrive, seems silly for just one bottle.

jawlz


quality posts: 12 Private Messages jawlz
rpm wrote:
5. Although before Prohibition there were significant efforts by wineries to hold red wines back for aging, and to release them at 8-10 when they were mature by traditional standards, a sad combination of the San Francisco earthquake and fire in 1906 (over 1 million gallons lost and another millon+ gallons used to fight the fire) then Prohibition depleted the stocks of aging wine and prevented the accumulation of new stocks for aging. After Prohibition, another bad combination of high demand for wine and a punitive tax regime conspired to make it uneconomic for all wineries to hold wines for 8-10 years of aging.



Had no idea this had ever happened. I will now use this example of wine being useful for the putting out of fires to justify more purchases to SWMBO; really, this wine is for our own safety come wildfire season!

kmagt


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kmagt
Ap13fish wrote:When can WineWoot! ship wine to the little state of Rhode Island?



Get a friend out of state to send it yo you. That's how my Arkansas-based daughter gets it

cortot20


quality posts: 163 Private Messages cortot20
rjquillin wrote:RPM,

When are you going to write the book?



He just did. Pay closer attention.

CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 189 Private Messages rjquillin
cortot20 wrote:He just did. Pay closer attention.


That was more like a sniff of a 50 year old cab you can't get a sip of.
But it was quite concentrated. From the tour, it seems rpm has an hour long story for everything, and all well worth the time.

CT

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
rjquillin wrote:That was more like a sniff of a 50 year old cab you can't get a sip of.
But it was quite concentrated. From the tour, it seems rpm has an hour long story for everything, and all well worth the time.



It was a 1978, which made it just a few months shy of 34 in July.... and many people did not even get a sniff.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 187 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
gholt121 wrote:I'd like to see the wine broken up into small quantities. Sometimes, I just want ONE bottle. Can you, Woot!, do that??



They've done it before. However, those are usually the Black Tie wines, which cost over $65+ each.


Best thing to do is find other Wineaux close to you (usually at a WW Gathering, hint, hint) that you can split the larger offerings with.

I've split offerings with tenuki up in NoCal at times. But that works because I have the wine storage locker that can keep the wines. And it helps that we either swap up in NoCal (from D&D or other visits I make) or in Vegas.


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

mibutterflywingz


quality posts: 4 Private Messages mibutterflywingz

If I had an address in a state like Florida (that isn't blue light) and all my mail gets forwarded to a blue light state, is that okay?

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 35 Private Messages ddeuddeg
rjquillin wrote:That was more like a sniff of a 50 year old cab you can't get a sip of.
But it was quite concentrated. From the tour, it seems rpm has an hour long story for everything, and all well worth the time.

No kidding. I've been on three rpm-led tours, and still learned from this 10 paragraph sniff. And the tiniest sip of that 34-year-old Cab was phenomenal.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

omomma


quality posts: 1 Private Messages omomma

WHEN WILL YOU GET A MALBEC? PLEASE!!!!! pretty please?

Reclaimer456


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Reclaimer456
rageje wrote:Why is wine so difficult.

Beer is easy to understand. There are just a few major categories (e.g., lager, IPAs) and once you have tasted one from each, you have a general idea what they are about (what does hoppy mean).

I guess if it was easy anyone could be a wine snob. I guess I'll stop wining now.


I'm not a beer drinker, but you could say the exact same thing about wine.

curtisuxor


quality posts: 56 Private Messages curtisuxor

RPM, Thanks for that thorough explanation. I almost exclusively drink California Cab Savs and never noticed it. Now I know why.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
curtisuxor wrote:RPM, Thanks for that thorough explanation. I almost exclusively drink California Cab Savs and never noticed it. Now I know why.



I'm guessing you rarely drink them older than 5 or 6, and generally when released which typically means 2-4. It's now common to release lower end Cabs at 2 (or even less) and better ones at 3-4. Back in the day, there were few really low end Cabs (or they weren't vintage dated), and most Cabs were released no earlier than 3-4, with the best ones released as late as 5-6.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

willybbridge


quality posts: 0 Private Messages willybbridge

I would love to see a regional woot wine tour!! Do a couple days from Cali, couple days from NY, couple days from Italy, etc...