WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Poll: What type of wine would you suggest to some who doesn’t normally drink the stuff?
  • 12.6% - Cabernet Sauvignon 126
  • 15% - Merlot 150
  • 22.3% - Pinot Grigio 223
  • 9.1% - Sauvignon Blanc 91
  • 28.4% - something the sparkles 284
  • 12.5% - Other (specify in the comments) 125
999 votes

Well, how do you fare compared to the Zeitgeist? Chat up your fellow wooters and let us know how lame this poll was or what obvious choices we missed. For example: Was this poll a) STUPID, b) DUMB, c) POINTLESS or d) ALL OF THE ABOVE?

ckeilah


quality posts: 149 Private Messages ckeilah

Depends on the person and his taste.

Please do not increment my Quality Posts count. 69 is a good place to be. ;-)
MOD: We had to...we just HAD TO...

papamochi


quality posts: 1 Private Messages papamochi

Without knowing more about them I'd say petite sirah or riesling

FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIEND DRINK WHITE ZINFANDEL!

mdkopper


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mdkopper

Cooking wine, what do they know..

stnkyjoe


quality posts: 0 Private Messages stnkyjoe

Single Malt. Why give them something they don't drink?

pullmyheartstrings


quality posts: 0 Private Messages pullmyheartstrings

Riesling is always tasty.

natalieug


quality posts: 11 Private Messages natalieug

Beaujolais Villages

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm

Depends on the person's general tastes, but the most important principle to keep in mind is that whatever you recommend should be a straightforward wine which does not require experience to appreciate. Additional considerations include moderate alcohol, no more than light to moderate tannin (if red), fresher rather than overripe fruit flavors, and a lack of a single overwhelming characteristic such as too much oak. Balanced.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

JadedMouse


quality posts: 0 Private Messages JadedMouse

Moscato is great for people just starting to try wine.

threemoons


quality posts: 19 Private Messages threemoons

I am always a fan of funky, chunky, purpletooth couchpounder Cali Zins. Just a personal bias. Get the best pizza or pasta that you can, with a good bottle of this, and go to town.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
natalieug wrote:Beaujolais Villages



Not a bad choice, if well-made. The difficulty is that 3/4 of Beaujolais Villages is virtually undrinkable, and 98% of Beaujolais Nouveaux is undrinkable.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
JadedMouse wrote:Moscato is great for people just starting to try wine.



Only if the people have very pronounced sweet teeth.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
threemoons wrote:I am always a fan of funky, chunky, purpletooth couchpounder Cali Zins. Just a personal bias. Get the best pizza or pasta that you can, with a good bottle of this, and go to town.



For most non-wine drinkers, this may be the worst possible choice: too alcoholic, too tannic and too overpoweringly overripe, even for pizza or pasta.

Wines of this type are typically for laying down and avoiding (apologies to Monty Python....)

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
mdkopper wrote:Cooking wine, what do they know..



You're of the "if they decide they hate wine, all the more for me" school, I take it.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
pullmyheartstrings wrote:Riesling is always tasty.



Riesling is tricky, but can be a very good introduction.

Certainly, it was by far the preferred wine for US military types stationed in Europe over the past 70-odd years, most of whom had not been wine drinkers before the went overseas. (as an aside, in the mid-1970s, one could always buy very, very good German wines in military exchanges at very reasonable prices - far better selections and prices than for either California or French wine).

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

tinasmith1115


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tinasmith1115
JadedMouse wrote:Moscato is great for people just starting to try wine.



I agree, or a sweet red.

sandrab8401


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sandrab8401

A really good von Kesselstadt piesporter goldtropchen is my fave.

lqotw


quality posts: 1 Private Messages lqotw

If a person is really new or inexperienced with wine, chances are they will find a white the most palatable. I'd recommend a nice aromatic Riesling.
Please note that, this is a purely subjective comment coming from someone who allowed her 13-year-old sister talk her 12-yr-old self into drinking the better part of a half gallon bottle of burgundy, one night, while the parents were out. Bad idea. Hard lesson. Only had to learn it once.

LQOTW
(If only she'd use her Powers for Good)

KierDran


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KierDran

I would always suggest a late-harvest, or any after-dinner sweet wine.

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 35 Private Messages ddeuddeg
rpm wrote:98% of Beaujolais Nouveaux is undrinkable.

Indeed. And I have yet to find the 2% that is drinkable.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

SmilingBoognish


quality posts: 49 Private Messages SmilingBoognish

It really depends on the person, as others have noted. Having said that, dry Gewurtz from the Anderson Valley or even Alsace seems to have broad appeal to many.

Red wine is trickier, in my opinion, but if you're eating some hearty meat I've had success with BV Rutherford cabernet. In my experience people either love it or hate it, so pour a small glass at Zany to the max!

jackgrover1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jackgrover1

A good Riesling is usually safe but if you don't mind spending a bit more, then most any German ice wine is perfect. They are fruity and refreshing. Like a cool, crisp, fruit juice with a bonus.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
ddeuddeg wrote:Indeed. And I have yet to find the 2% that is drinkable.



Well, I'm trying to be generous. Back in the early 1980s, before he became fashionable and the quality went to hell, Georges Duboeuf made a drinkable Nouveau in good years. Haven't had one of his I liked since maybe 1988. I recall finding a very few which I don't remember drinkable back then when I regularly went to the trade Nouveaux tasting to help a friend decide what to stock. We'd taste at least 40-50, of which no more than 1 or 2 would be drinkable. Those were usually on allocation, so we had to find also the least undrinkable wine he could get in sufficient quantity to keep the customers who were looking for the stuff happy. Although the food was usually good at that tasting (which we enjoyed after our forced march through the wines), it was probably my least favorite tasting of the year. I did once eat free at a now gone Italian trattoria in the Village for a year or more when I was able to get (and give to) the owner a case of the Duboeuf Nouveaux that he couldn't get from his distributor. The essence of a good deal: we both got what we wanted, we both thought we got the better of the bargain, and, given our cost differentials, both did.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

nechee


quality posts: 0 Private Messages nechee

Moscato!

jawlz


quality posts: 12 Private Messages jawlz
rpm wrote:Riesling is tricky, but can be a very good introduction.

Certainly, it was by far the preferred wine for US military types stationed in Europe over the past 70-odd years, most of whom had not been wine drinkers before the went overseas. (as an aside, in the mid-1970s, one could always buy very, very good German wines in military exchanges at very reasonable prices - far better selections and prices than for either California or French wine).



I have a hard time deciphering the various labeling conventions on German wines, despite some familiarity with the language (not quite passably spoken, but not too far off either). My wife and I spent a week in the Mosel Valley and had some very lovely wines while there, but finding a consistent descriptor of how a wine tastes on most labels (beyond trocken and halb-trocken, which were accurate descriptors, though not actually on many labels) was still rather difficult.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
jawlz wrote:I have a hard time deciphering the various labeling conventions on German wines, despite some familiarity with the language (not quite passably spoken, but not too far off either). My wife and I spent a week in the Mosel Valley and had some very lovely wines while there, but finding a consistent descriptor of how a wine tastes on most labels (beyond trocken and halb-trocken, which were accurate descriptors, though not actually on many labels) was still rather difficult.



German labels give much information, but little in the way of description about taste: it will give you the name of the grape, the quality level, some indication of the level of sweetness (more helpful as the wines get sweeter) and so on. If you don't know what those descriptors mean it's not helpful, even confusing. I almost never buy German wines that are not Qualitätswein bestimmter Anbaugebiete (QbA), and almost always those are mit Prädikat.

If you like relatively dry wines, get a Kabinett Prädikat wine labeled 'trocken'. (Remembering that Riesling is floral and may seem sweeter because of the aroma than it is and, the acid balance may make something a bit sweeter seem drier than it is....)

Spätlese wines will be sweeter and Auslese sweeter yet.

Those are the wines most of us encounter and drink.

Beerenauslese and Trockenbeerenauslese wines are very sweet desert wines, expensive and not particularly commonly found.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

novfrog


quality posts: 0 Private Messages novfrog

Lychee wine was the first wine I ever tried that I liked, Pumpkin was second, with Moscato being third. I still dislike most wines.


JadedMouse wrote:Moscato is great for people just starting to try wine.



Levon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Levon

I'd suggest to buy grape remains, crush them and make own wine It'll cost a few dollars 'cause fruit stores usually get rid of them, and it'll be enough for one bottle.





icthulhu


quality posts: 6 Private Messages icthulhu

Probably a Sangiovese, Zinfandel, or Tempranillo. They're real wines, but can go with practically anything.

jenaa


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jenaa

Seriously, though, wouldn't it be white zinfandel?? (and isn't that why experienced wine drinkers hate on it so much?)

This is an interesting change in disappointments.

kmagt


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kmagt
rpm wrote:Depends on the person's general tastes, but the most important principle to keep in mind is that whatever you recommend should be a straightforward wine which does not require experience to appreciate. Additional considerations include moderate alcohol, no more than light to moderate tannin (if red), fresher rather than overripe fruit flavors, and a lack of a single overwhelming characteristic such as too much oak. Balanced.



Moderate alcohol unless it's a second or third date

tmencinosa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tmencinosa

I would recommend either a Moscato or a Riesling to someone that is just starting to drink wine. Those two choices are not overly bitter, and are a great introduction into the wide world of wine.

Shinespark


quality posts: 33 Private Messages Shinespark

Throwing my hat into the Riesling ring, though I've found German ice wines quite light and easy to drink.

They also run the gamut, but most Pinot Noirs I've had are light enough for the novice.

Also, if you're cruel, Vintage Port.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
Shinespark wrote:Throwing my hat into the Riesling ring, though I've found German ice wines quite light and easy to drink.

They also run the gamut, but most Pinot Noirs I've had are light enough for the novice.

Also, if you're cruel, Vintage Port.



Eiswein is rather rather and tends to be very expensive. It seems very odd to me that one would give a non-wine drinker something she or he would have trouble finding and, likely, not be able to afford on a regular basis.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

cmichellesmith1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages cmichellesmith1

Moscato, it's great for Skippy Squirrel's I happen to love it

chemvictim


quality posts: 4 Private Messages chemvictim

Riesling or Gewurtz

mjc613


quality posts: 48 Private Messages mjc613

I would suggest something that would go well with what they are eating. In most cases, that would be a chianti or a sangiovese-based wine, because they go with almost anything. If they are just hanging out by a pool and want something to sip, I would probably recommend a chenin blanc instead, unless I KNOW they like sweet stuff - then it's a German riesling.