WootBot


quality posts: 16 Private Messages WootBot

Staff

Shun Ken Onion 7" Santoku Knife

Last Purchase:
3 years ago
Order Pace (rank):
Top 31% of Home Woots
Top 45% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 12% of Home Woots
Top 26% of all Woots



Quality Posts


thumperchick


quality posts: 258 Private Messages thumperchick

I swear my other knives just called out and asked me for this...

TheHuntress


quality posts: 6 Private Messages TheHuntress

Yea!!!! :-) :-)
Now my set is complete

bkarlan


quality posts: 46 Private Messages bkarlan

Ugh! I just paid more for this on RueLaLa.

"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse..." - John Stuart Mill

Moueska


quality posts: 54 Private Messages Moueska

HAH! I WAS RIGHT! TWINS!

:D

Gir6543


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Gir6543

I am 6'4... obviously i have large hands. i want to make sure i can use this blade...has anyone who is 6' or larger had experience. i would love to hear your experience

MagicVines


quality posts: 7 Private Messages MagicVines
Gir6543 wrote:I am 6'4... obviously i have large hands. i want to make sure i can use this blade...has anyone who is 6' or larger had experience. i would love to hear your experience



I don't own this particular knife, but I think you'll be fine.

It's a Japanese knife but the designer, Ken Onion, is an American (and a former U.S. Marine), so I'm pretty sure you'll have no problem.

[MOD: No advertising pls]

matt1976


quality posts: 10 Private Messages matt1976

Blade thickness?

taxwizard


quality posts: 8 Private Messages taxwizard

My Kitchen "wants" these days are so simple....One of these Shun Santoku knives and a Boos Chopping Block !

nyyankeeez


quality posts: 2 Private Messages nyyankeeez

This is the last knife you'll ever need! It cuts through butternut squash like butter, and it cuts butter! Razor sharp! As good as Henckels and Wüsthof.

sctirvn687


quality posts: 1 Private Messages sctirvn687

I thought this is an expensive knife for just cutting onions. lol

jjgoodeats


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jjgoodeats

So no wooden display stand? I have 4-5 other Shuns so I don't need the stand for mine but I'm thinking about one of these for a wedding gift.

knate


quality posts: 0 Private Messages knate

these knives are awesome. Have the 8 inch chef knife, and this will be a great addition to the kitchen.

skakebite


quality posts: 4 Private Messages skakebite
sctirvn687 wrote:I thought this is an expensive knife for just cutting onions. lol



That's actually fairly accurate.

smartheart


quality posts: 94 Private Messages smartheart

Looks like a winning product and a winning deal. Good work, Woot.


"Three be the things I shall never attain: Envy, content, and sufficient champagne."
--D. Parker

bluejester


quality posts: 587 Private Messages bluejester

poorhungrydoctor


quality posts: 7 Private Messages poorhungrydoctor

Was about to jump, then saw the tax.
Since when is California taxed on Woot?

skakebite


quality posts: 4 Private Messages skakebite
poorhungrydoctor wrote:Was about to jump, then saw the tax.
Since when is California taxed on Woot?



No more internet purchases without tax in Ca. Starting 9/15. It was nice while it lasted.

Cotmweasel


quality posts: 2 Private Messages Cotmweasel

These are great knives, made by Kershaw (They make Kershaw, Zero Tolerance and Shun knives). I have some of their knives, and have handled knives from every one of their lines. They make some of the best cutlery I have ever had the pleasure of using.

bsattin1


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bsattin1

does this not come with a stand?

pghpenguin


quality posts: 1 Private Messages pghpenguin

There's nothing better than Shun knives. They are amazing! Also beautiful and durable. The Japanese blades are so sharp & precise. I love them. You can catch Chef Alton Brown in a series of YouTube videos talking all about Shun knives.

ngoodfri


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ngoodfri

i cook for a living, and i've been lusting after this knife for almost a decade, but it was always just out of my price range. now i have something to challenge my Global g-33 as my everyday prep knife. thank you woot!

DaZoneRanger


quality posts: 49 Private Messages DaZoneRanger

Damascus cladding? What is that, like a Damascus veneer? It says vg-10 cutting core, which is good enough as far as the knife goes (and probably better than a full damascus blade), so I'm guessing the Damascus cladding is just for show. It's like having a Damascus knife and not having one all at the same time! I guess Damascus etching was too for show only, so they went with Damascus cladding, which is just as much for show but more "real". Lol

Anyway, Shun makes some primo knives, but every isn't going to love them. I had one myself and ended up selling it. The handle just wasn't comfortable for me and I still preferred to use a cheap (but sharp) knife. I've tried the other Shuns at Sur La Table, but didn't care for any of them. Didn't care for globals either, even though I really wanted to love them. I mostly just use a Wustoff classic, now, and I'm pretty happy with it, although I will surely eventually get a Mac knife, just because I've been lusting after them for years now and by the looks of the handles, they're just what I like.

ngoodfri


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ngoodfri
nyyankeeez wrote:This is the last knife you'll ever need! It cuts through butternut squash like butter, and it cuts butter! Razor sharp! As good as Henckels and Wüsthof.



BETTER than Henckels or Wüsthof.

freakaccident12


quality posts: 0 Private Messages freakaccident12

I have wanted a really good knife for a long time. My Henckels' that I a bought 10 years ago have been good to me but have never been sharp enough for long enough. I can't wait to use the Shun.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 781 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

poorhungrydoctor wrote:Was about to jump, then saw the tax.
Since when is California taxed on Woot?



Effective September 15, 2012, Woot, Inc. was required to begin collecting sales tax on orders shipped to destinations in California.


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seattlekleins


quality posts: 8 Private Messages seattlekleins
ngoodfri wrote:BETTER than Henckels or Wüsthof.



What he said. Vexingly, I just bought a Shun santoku. Wish I'd held off a few days!

My Shuns are the best knives I've ever used; I prefer them to the Wusthofs I have.

It is worth noting that this has a sharper angle than most knives out there. It makes it sharper, but it also means you need to use a steel more often. And for pity's sake, don't use an electric knife sharpener on this!

ericshmerick


quality posts: 9 Private Messages ericshmerick
ngoodfri wrote:BETTER than Henckels or Wüsthof.



Unless you are breaking down chicken bones. Asian angles are fra-jee-lay.

You know, expensive and stuff.

vladistov


quality posts: 52 Private Messages vladistov

I can't say I'm entirely happy about being taxed in California when my purchase beat midnight in the state.

mightyyui


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mightyyui

I have *AlWAYS* wanted this knife. Always. I have been saying for about 10 years if I ever found one for under $100 I would buy it on the spot.. and sure enough.

I kind of wish I could hug Woot right now.

((HUGS!))

tooohasty


quality posts: 0 Private Messages tooohasty
DaZoneRanger wrote:Damascus cladding? What is that, like a Damascus veneer? It says vg-10 cutting core, which is good enough as far as the knife goes (and probably better than a full damascus blade), so I'm guessing the Damascus cladding is just for show. It's like having a Damascus knife and not having one all at the same time! I guess Damascus etching was too for show only, so they went with Damascus cladding, which is just as much for show but more "real". Lol

Anyway, Shun makes some primo knives, but every isn't going to love them. I had one myself and ended up selling it. The handle just wasn't comfortable for me and I still preferred to use a cheap (but sharp) knife. I've tried the other Shuns at Sur La Table, but didn't care for any of them. Didn't care for globals either, even though I really wanted to love them. I mostly just use a Wustoff classic, now, and I'm pretty happy with it, although I will surely eventually get a Mac knife, just because I've been lusting after them for years now and by the looks of the handles, they're just what I like.



Being Damascus clad is very eye catching and makes an average looking blade beautiful. Having said that, it also glides through food much easier then a solid blade. You'll notice it a lot more with fish or other meats but the difference is clearly there. And yes the vg 10 as a core is a much more durable stainless steel and will hold its edge longer.

Put me down for 1.

lwang


quality posts: 35 Private Messages lwang

wood handle? can I still throw it in the dishwasher?

panthiest


quality posts: 21 Private Messages panthiest
tooohasty wrote:Being Damascus clad is very eye catching and makes an average looking blade beautiful. Having said that, it also glides through food much easier then a solid blade. You'll notice it a lot more with fish or other meats but the difference is clearly there. And yes the vg 10 as a core is a much more durable stainless steel and will hold its edge longer.

Put me down for 1.




Why would it glide through food better? I thought true damascus was known for making a sort of microscopic serrated edge because of a reaction between the two steels. This being on everything but the edge seems like it would make the knife stick more if anything.

I could be way off, but if someone could explain I'm curious.

I might have to get it either way- I've always wanted a damascus knife (mainly for looks) but I can't really afford $1000+ for 1 knife

vladistov


quality posts: 52 Private Messages vladistov
panthiest wrote:Why would it glide through food better? I thought true damascus was known for making a sort of microscopic serrated edge because of a reaction between the two steels. This being on everything but the edge seems like it would make the knife stick more if anything.

I could be way off, but if someone could explain I'm curious.

I might have to get it either way- I've always wanted a damascus knife (mainly for looks) but I can't really afford $1000+ for 1 knife



Only the VG-10 core is doing the cutting. The stick-resistance is due to the layering and bead-blasted finish; a solid, polished blade is more prone to suction.

vladistov


quality posts: 52 Private Messages vladistov
lwang wrote:wood handle? can I still throw it in the dishwasher?



Absolutely not; it shall destroy the handle. Also, the Ken Onion knives still rust where the bolster meets the blade.

vladistov


quality posts: 52 Private Messages vladistov
bsattin1 wrote:does this not come with a stand?



If it doesn't, you're not missing out on much. The Ken Onion Santoku that came with stands were packaged with stands meant for the 8-inch Chef, and they don't fit properly in them on account of being too short. There's not much to them, though, and if you have the tools, a custom display stand is easy enough to craft.

sdc100


quality posts: 514 Private Messages sdc100
nyyankeeez wrote:This is the last knife you'll ever need!



I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable using this for paring though...

Greshmahg


quality posts: 52 Private Messages Greshmahg

AVOID this knife like the plague! It's *not* a true Santoku knife. I have a number of other Shun knives (including 3 other Ken Onions - a cleaver, a paring knife, and a chef's knife), and this one....this one does not measure up. At all.

I bought it on an Amazon Gold Box deal some time back. The thing shows up and, true to Shun form, it's sharp as a razor. True to Ken Onion form, it fits in my hand like a glove....

....so here I am, thrilled to death with it. Then a couple weeks later, I'm cutting a boneless lamb leg that I had in the freezer for a little bit to firm it up. Not frozen, just firm. The damn thing chips. Blew my mind. I've never had a knife chip, not even my ceramics.

So I call Shun and explain it to them so they can warranty a replacement for me, and they refuse. Why? They claim that you aren't allowed to use their santoku knives to cut anything that at one point had a bone.

Whiskey. Tango. Foxtrot.

I argue with them for quite a while on this, asking them how it is they are selling a knife that you can't even fully use in the kitchen. There are nothing in the instructions saying "vegetables only". But they won't budge.

So I return it to Amazon, get my money back, and end the whole thing. This knife is ridiculously sharp, but it has zero durability, and Shun no longer stands behind their products the way they used to. Any knife so fragile that you can't even cut meat with it (keep in mind, no bone in the meat for it to catch), is not a knife worth having, especially not for 100 bucks.

Shun used to stand for the highest level of quality, but apparently those days are over (reading reviews on Amazon reveals a LOT of other people who have had a similar experience). If you want a top-flight Japanese knife, go with Mac or Kasumi.

lwang


quality posts: 35 Private Messages lwang

are these better than the other japanese type of knives like the ginsus or the ones make of pottery material? Some like the ginsus can cut thru nails and bones.

vladistov


quality posts: 52 Private Messages vladistov
sdc100 wrote:I'm not sure I'd feel comfortable using this for paring though...



That said, the Ken Onion paring knife isn't necessarily the solution, either. The 8-inch chef is the only knife designed by Ken Onion, and it was sold alone for some time. Shun finally introduced a complete Ken Onion line, but those knives imitated a design not intended for them. While the aesthetics are satisfied, the angled blade on the paring arguably isn't so adept for paring tasks--it comes from a design meant for a chef knife.

The Ken Onion design translates well to the Santoku, being a form of chef knife. This holds true for the slicing and bread knives; and while some may not appreciate the design on the smaller knives, such as the boning and utilities, it's manageable since they are similarly held. But if any is the exception, I'd have to say it's the paring. I simply have experienced no benefit over the straight design of a traditional parer, and feel it serves more of a collectible value to the Ken Onion sets than a practical. The Shun Classic Vegetable (Sheep's-foot) paring knives, I do highly recommend for the same cutting performance (Shun Ken Onion and Shun Classic are made from the same material).