papamochi


quality posts: 1 Private Messages papamochi

I was just reading up on RPM's wine buying tips and it reminded me of a tip I picked up, I believe in Food and Wine a few years ago. Many restaurant someliers will have special find favorites that are little known and unlikely to sell to people looking for something familiar. Many of them will make it the second cheapest wine in that section (red, white, or by varietal) because they know people rarely buy the cheapest out of principle so this will get more people to try it. I have tried it out many times and only been disappointed once or twice with the results. Any thoughts?

FRIENDS DON'T LET FRIEND DRINK WHITE ZINFANDEL!

JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON
papamochi wrote:I was just reading up on RPM's wine buying tips and it reminded me of a tip I picked up, I believe in Food and Wine a few years ago. Many restaurant someliers will have special find favorites that are little known and unlikely to sell to people looking for something familiar. Many of them will make it the second cheapest wine in that section (red, white, or by varietal) because they know people rarely buy the cheapest out of principle so this will get more people to try it. I have tried it out many times and only been disappointed once or twice with the results. Any thoughts?



Second Cheapest Wine

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

redwinefan


quality posts: 74 Private Messages redwinefan
JOATMON wrote:Second Cheapest Wine



Awesome

"You need to invest in a corkscrew. Wine is for drinking." -- Peter Wellington

cmaldoon


quality posts: 62 Private Messages cmaldoon
JOATMON wrote:Second Cheapest Wine



Classic.

And in response to the original post: I have heard that one third of the way up the list from the cheapest is the best value.

Personally I just do corkage. Too much wine in my cellar and too picky a palate to pay out the nose for a random bottle.

2014 - 20 Btl. Fjellene (10 bot), Urraca Chard (10 bot)
Last purchase: 5/3/14

2013 - 75 btl. 2012 - 98 btl. 2011 - 112 btl. 2010 - 30 btl.
My Cellar

SmilingBoognish


quality posts: 49 Private Messages SmilingBoognish

I put myself through college waiting tables, which is probably the biggest reason I'm into wine today.
It really depends entirely upon the restaurant, and probably geography. My dining experience as it pertains to purchasing is focused on the SF Bay Area. It is true that often times the "cheapest wine" is a $5-6 bottle that the restaurant sells for $20-$30. For markups closer to the typical 100% one has to move up the list a bit, but expect to pay $40-$50 for a bottle that would otherwise set you back $20-$25. There are rare instances where the mark up is a mere 15%-20%, and those are often found by asking a server in the know or the house sommelier.

sdwindansea


quality posts: 4 Private Messages sdwindansea
papamochi wrote:I was just reading up on RPM's wine buying tips ...



Where are these tips you speak of? Sounds like some interesting reading.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
sdwindansea wrote:Where are these tips you speak of? Sounds like some interesting reading.



See: Notes on Wine Tasting for 1982 Summer Associates Tasting, pp 5-6 Miscellaneous Aspects of Ordering and Buying Wine

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
rpm wrote:See: Notes on Wine Tasting for 1982 Summer Associates Tasting, pp 5-6 Miscellaneous Aspects of Ordering and Buying Wine


Neat resource!

I'm just hanging out, really.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
inkycatz wrote:Neat resource!



Note that buying in NYC/price information is 30 years old, but remains accurate in relative terms adjusting for inflation.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

redwinefan


quality posts: 74 Private Messages redwinefan
SmilingBoognish wrote:I put myself through college waiting tables, which is probably the biggest reason I'm into wine today.
It really depends entirely upon the restaurant, and probably geography. My dining experience as it pertains to purchasing is focused on the SF Bay Area. It is true that often times the "cheapest wine" is a $5-6 bottle that the restaurant sells for $20-$30. For markups closer to the typical 100% one has to move up the list a bit, but expect to pay $40-$50 for a bottle that would otherwise set you back $20-$25. There are rare instances where the mark up is a mere 15%-20%, and those are often found by asking a server in the know or the house sommelier.



I find in Austin that restaurant bottles go for 3 to even 4x retail prices for the same bottle. If you go high enough up the list, you can get a bottle for 2x the retail price, but I'm not usually willing to go that high up.

I hate paying $40 for a crappy $10 bottle when I know how great a real $40 bottle out of my collection can be.

"You need to invest in a corkscrew. Wine is for drinking." -- Peter Wellington

sdwindansea


quality posts: 4 Private Messages sdwindansea
rpm wrote:See: Notes on Wine Tasting for 1982 Summer Associates Tasting, pp 5-6 Miscellaneous Aspects of Ordering and Buying Wine



Thanks, I appreciate it and it was a great read.

Another option at many restaurants is to bring your own bottle and pay a "corkage" fee to have them open it and service. In San Diego, this usually varies from $5 to $20. There are also a couple of wine stores that also serve really good food. They only charge a $5 corkage fee if you buy a bottle off their racks which is a great deal.

cortot20


quality posts: 162 Private Messages cortot20
sdwindansea wrote:Thanks, I appreciate it and it was a great read.

Another option at many restaurants is to bring your own bottle and pay a "corkage" fee to have them open it and service. In San Diego, this usually varies from $5 to $20. There are also a couple of wine stores that also serve really good food. They only charge a $5 corkage fee if you buy a bottle off their racks which is a great deal.



They shouldn't be charging you any corkage for a bottle purchased in store. IMHO

CT

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
cortot20 wrote:They shouldn't be charging you any corkage for a bottle purchased in store. IMHO



If they didn't charge corkage, they'd just raise the prices generally.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

beefytaco


quality posts: 7 Private Messages beefytaco

When I want a great bottle of wine with dinner, I plan the restaurant accordingly and choose a place with a killer list. (Or, usually, cook for myself).

I have no problem ordering a cocktail (make 'em do a bit of work for my $10), or a beer while out if the wine list isn't spectacular.

___
I have two accounts- this 'anonymous' username for commenting, as well as a 'purchasing' account which is my real name. Apologies for the white box on the left.

Also, in the interest of full disclosure- I'm ITB, selling wine for a living. None of my wines have ever been featured on Woot though, so don't fear the shilling.

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
beefytaco wrote:When I want a great bottle of wine with dinner, I plan the restaurant accordingly and choose a place with a killer list. (Or, usually, cook for myself).

I have no problem ordering a cocktail (make 'em do a bit of work for my $10), or a beer while out if the wine list isn't spectacular.



It's much less common than it used to be that restaurants with really good food (for which wine is an appropriate accompaniment) don't have at least a decent wine list. And, those that don't have a decent list, for one reason or another, will usually let you bring your own wine if it's something special and not on their list.

Typically, unless the list is ridiculously bad on quality or price or both, if I bring a significant bottle for the main course, I'll order the first bottle for the appetizers/soup course from the list.

And, always, always offer the sommelier a taste of anything significant that you've brought in. Getting known as one who does this often leads to one being seen as a 'friend of the house' with the accompanying improvement in table placement, ability to obtain reservations, and general willingness to be accommodating to requests and special occasions.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 187 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
rpm wrote:It's much less common than it used to be that restaurants with really good food (for which wine is an appropriate accompaniment) don't have at least a decent wine list. And, those that don't have a decent list, for one reason or another, will usually let you bring your own wine if it's something special and not on their list.

Typically, unless the list is ridiculously bad on quality or price or both, if I bring a significant bottle for the main course, I'll order the first bottle for the appetizers/soup course from the list.

And, always, always offer the sommelier a taste of anything significant that you've brought in. Getting known as one who does this often leads to one being seen as a 'friend of the house' with the accompanying improvement in table placement, ability to obtain reservations, and general willingness to be accommodating to requests and special occasions.




And about half the time (maybe more) they waive the corkage when you share a taste with the waiter/waitress/sommelier (although the latter is found less and less).


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.