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quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

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Zenaida Fire Sign Estate Cuveé

Speed to First Woot:
5m 34.000s
First Sucker:
favrerocks
Last Wooter to Woot:
jpl4zd
Last Purchase:
3 years ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 33% of Wine Woots
Bottom 33% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Top 48% of Wine Woots
Top 50% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 14% first woot
  • 5% second woot
  • 16% < 10 woots
  • 20% < 25 woots
  • 45% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 9% joined today
  • 3% one week old
  • 5% one month old
  • 14% one year old
  • 69% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 90% bought 1
  • 10% bought 2
  • 0% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

6%
3%
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1%
3%
5%
9%
5%
6%
7%
5%
3%
3%
4%
5%
3%
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4%
7%
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Woots by State

zero wooters wootinglots of wooters wooting





Quality Posts



Cesare


quality posts: 1695 Private Messages Cesare

Zenaida Fire Sign Estate Cuveé
$69.99 + $5 shipping
CONDITION: Red
PRODUCT: 3 2007 Fire Sign Estate Cuvee
CT link above

Winery website

Yelp

Previous offer:
10/12/11 (2006)

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

kylemittskus


quality posts: 233 Private Messages kylemittskus

What percentage does each varietal represent in the blend?

Also, TA, pH, and oak treatment?

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

jimjacks66


quality posts: 32 Private Messages jimjacks66

The 2006 offered here earlier on Woot was very very good. Not passing this up!

Was not first sucker as distracted by Adele's performance on the Grammys:

Zenaida Fire Sign Estate Cuveé
Current numbers (updated each minute)
First sucker: favrerocks
Speed to first woot: 5m 34.397s
Last wooter to woot: jimjacks66

favrerocks


quality posts: 0 Private Messages favrerocks

I'm in for a set of 3 and I'd love to labrat this (if y'all still do that). Looking forward to this wine.

Random Crap x3
Norman, Monticello (rat), Cavedoni (bv), Chase (x3), Benson (x3) and much more to come

kagayaki1


quality posts: 12 Private Messages kagayaki1

Would love to labrat. Copious notes for all promised!

cortot20


quality posts: 161 Private Messages cortot20
jimjacks66 wrote:The 2006 offered here earlier on Woot was very very good. Not passing this up!

Was not first sucker as distracted by Adele:

Zenaida Fire Sign Estate Cuveé
Current numbers (updated each minute)
First sucker: favrerocks
Speed to first woot: 5m 34.397s
Last wooter to woot: jimjacks66



Any personal tasting notes on this.

CT

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 187 Private Messages MarkDaSpark

Courtesy of CJ (no changes from last week, IIRC):

Remember, Dark & Delicious is this week!!!!


cjsiege wrote:Upcoming Woot Wine Gatherings…All The News for the week of February 5th.

February
2/17-20: Dark & Delicious Weekend

April
4/27-28: Ohio Wine Dinner with Scott and Jana Harvey
TBD: NoVA/DC #26: Theme TBD
TBD: NYC #19: Cool stuff mikegberg is going to miss on the tour
TBD: NorCal #12: Volcanic Terroir

May
5/19: CyberPub Cellars 2011 Rogue Rhone Bottling- NEWEST Thread!

July
7/17-19: RPM's History Tour, Part 1
7/23-25 or 7/24-26: RPM's History Tour, Part 2


Pending
TBD: Arizona Verde Valley Winery Weekend
TBD: Dallas #11


No events in your area??? Start one! Create an interest thread in the World of Wine Woot Community Tab!



So join or create a WW Gathering now!


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 187 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
kaheartaki1 wrote:Would love to labrat. Copious notes for all promised!



Labrats would already have the bottle(s), if Wine.Woot would activate it again. But IIRC, it's still on hiatus (means suspended).


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

Malink


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Malink

The label calls to me and is very well done. I like the fire sign. Has a fifth element feel to me.

On a separate note, is there is no cork in this wine? Please post percentages as well. What exactly is a cuvee? Wine wooters please help me out here. Thanks.

kgw7208


quality posts: 4 Private Messages kgw7208

Too hot for me. I stay under 15%, preferably under 14%.

jimjacks66


quality posts: 32 Private Messages jimjacks66
cortot20 wrote:Any personal tasting notes on this.



I brought a bottle to the 2012 Super Bowl party. The 2006 was hot (15.7% alcohol) but you would not know it when drinking. It probably has this alcohol % because of the Zin? The blend is unusual: Cabernet Sauvignon 55%, Syrah 35%, and Zinfandel 10%. Where will you find such a blend? Hard to describe but it had nice fruit, no noticeable alcohol and went well with the chicken wings (various hotness) served at the Superbowl Party. It also went well with the "gourmet" pizza a guest brought. It was versatile.

One might also say it went well with Madonna, MIA, LMFAO, Cee Lo, and Nicki Minaj. LOL

bobrush12866


quality posts: 8 Private Messages bobrush12866

Priced at $37 per bottle on their website.

Club members get 20% off, plus an additional 5% if purchasing more than 4, or an additional 10% if purchasing 12 or more.

Based on this...It's a decent deal!

aandrew667


quality posts: 3 Private Messages aandrew667
kylemittskus wrote:What percentage does each varietal represent in the blend?

Also, TA, pH, and oak treatment?





I have a bottle in front of me right now.

It's 55% Cab, 35% Syrah, and 10% Zin

It's a screw cap (the 2006 was the last year they used corks)

bobrush12866


quality posts: 8 Private Messages bobrush12866
aandrew667 wrote:I have a bottle in front of me right now.

It's 55% Cab, 35% Syrah, and 10% Zin

It's a screw cap (the 2006 was the last year they used corks)



So....Open it and tell us what you think!...or please share your opinion on one you may have already drank.

aandrew667


quality posts: 3 Private Messages aandrew667
bobrush12866 wrote:So....Open it and tell us what you think!...or please share your opinion on one you may have already drank.




I love these. I bought the last woot they had for the 2006 fire sign and liked it so much that I called the winery and ordered some more 2006 and a few 2007's.

I agree with the comments about the alcohol not overwhelming even though it is 15.5%. You would not necessarily guess that percentage off the bat. This is a smooth and very well rounded blend.

aandrew667


quality posts: 3 Private Messages aandrew667

btw,

I must add that the people at the winery seem great. The last time I called to place an order, the woman I spoke with could not have been friendlier. When I got the shipment, I discovered that she had included a hand written, personalized note. How often do you see stuff like that these days?

bobrush12866


quality posts: 8 Private Messages bobrush12866
aandrew667 wrote:btw,

I must add that the people at the winery seem great. The last time I called to place an order, the woman I spoke with could not have been friendlier. When I got the shipment, I discovered that she had included a hand written, personalized note. How often do you see stuff like that these days?



Okay...Based on this, I'm in....but for how many?

How many are you in for since you were a repeat buyer?

bobrush12866


quality posts: 8 Private Messages bobrush12866

Production please!...Number of cases!

olcubmaster


quality posts: 31 Private Messages olcubmaster

What do you call 12 bottles of Zenaida Fire Sign Estate Cuvee?

Another case for Nick Danger, Third Eye!

...and no anchovies.

Sugar 'em up and send 'em home

cortot20


quality posts: 161 Private Messages cortot20
bobrush12866 wrote:Production please!...Number of cases!



173 per the product spec sheet on the offer page.

CT

cortot20


quality posts: 161 Private Messages cortot20
kgw7208 wrote:Too hot for me. I stay under 15%, preferably under 14%.



I guess this excludes you from most of the red wine coming from paso.
It's a warmer climate than napa/Sonoma and so the sugars tend get very high.
I typically see paso Syrah in the 15+ range and it's one of my favorite regions for Syrah since it always seems to hold the alcohol content well.

You wont find much in the way of subtlety here which is great if you enjoy the style.

CT

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
cortot20 wrote:I guess this excludes you from most of the red wine coming from paso.
It's a warmer climate than napa/Sonoma and so the sugars tend get very high.
I typically see paso Syrah in the 15+ range and it's one of my favorite regions for Syrah since it always seems to hold the alcohol content well.

You wont find much in the way of subtlety here which is great if you enjoy the style.



I used to buy Paso/Templeton area reds (mostly Zinfandel or generic blends) back in the early 1970s when I was a grad student at Santa Barbara. You could often buy them out of the barrel at the winery, and there were different barrels if they knew and liked you. They were very rustic wines, but few of them came in above about 13.5% alcohol. Solid everyday drinkers for the sort of fare college students made for themselves and their friends, perfect with pizza or a burger.

Perhaps it was the then almost universally used St. George rootstock or the antiquated methods of the local winemakers, but they managed to get phenolic ripeness before the sugars went too high.

I think it's really less a matter of the fact that Paso is warm than it is a function of the current fashion in winemaking.

I won't say I've never enjoyed a wine that came in above 15%, but I can count them on one hand and have fingers left over.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

sdilullo


quality posts: 38 Private Messages sdilullo

How would this compare to the Kunde Dunfillan Cuvee that was offered on here a couple months ago? I seem to have thought that was pretty tasty (per a cryptic personal CT note) so this intrigues me.

my CT | bottles wooted to date: 282
my flying adventures | a mile of road will take you a mile, but a mile of runway will take you anywhere.

genemcsween


quality posts: 3 Private Messages genemcsween

I've got a lot of wine in my cellar right now but always love to add a good blend. Does anyone know about the drinking window?

Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. - Albert Einstein

sdilullo


quality posts: 38 Private Messages sdilullo
genemcsween wrote:I've got a lot of wine in my cellar right now but always love to add a good blend. Does anyone know about the drinking window?



CT is recommending now through 2014.

Going back through the vintages, it appears this blend always has a 3-year window beginning 4 years post-harvest.

my CT | bottles wooted to date: 282
my flying adventures | a mile of road will take you a mile, but a mile of runway will take you anywhere.

zenaidacellars


quality posts: 8 Private Messages zenaidacellars
sdilullo wrote:CT is recommending now through 2014.

Going back through the vintages, it appears this blend always has a 3-year window beginning 4 years post-harvest.



We recently tasted our 2004 Fire Sign and it was still holding up very well. The tannins turned to velvet and the fruit was still bright. With our 2007 Fire Sign you are safe through 2014 but I would say that it will have another 2 years on top of that.

zenaidacellars


quality posts: 8 Private Messages zenaidacellars
aandrew667 wrote:btw,

I must add that the people at the winery seem great. The last time I called to place an order, the woman I spoke with could not have been friendlier. When I got the shipment, I discovered that she had included a hand written, personalized note. How often do you see stuff like that these days?



Thanks!

We are a small winery, around 3,00 cases annually, and we like to take the time to thank you and to let you know that we appreciate your business. Hopefully someday you can make it out to Paso to see us at the winery!

zenaidacellars


quality posts: 8 Private Messages zenaidacellars
aandrew667 wrote:I love these. I bought the last woot they had for the 2006 fire sign and liked it so much that I called the winery and ordered some more 2006 and a few 2007's.

I agree with the comments about the alcohol not overwhelming even though it is 15.5%. You would not necessarily guess that percentage off the bat. This is a smooth and very well rounded blend.



Thanks for compliment. Like some have said, the alcohol is at 15.5%. For some this just means, pour me another glass! For those that this may seem a little high, I challenge you to give it a taste. We've all had those wines that burn at the back of the throat from that heat but like our friend here said, it is smooth and well rounded. To us it is a great representation of a Paso Robles fun and delicious red blend.

redredwine67


quality posts: 14 Private Messages redredwine67
rpm wrote:I used to buy Paso/Templeton area reds (mostly Zinfandel or generic blends) back in the early 1970s when I was a grad student at Santa Barbara. You could often buy them out of the barrel at the winery, and there were different barrels if they knew and liked you. They were very rustic wines, but few of them came in above about 13.5% alcohol. Solid everyday drinkers for the sort of fare college students made for themselves and their friends, perfect with pizza or a burger.

Perhaps it was the then almost universally used St. George rootstock or the antiquated methods of the local winemakers, but they managed to get phenolic ripeness before the sugars went too high.I think it's really less a matter of the fact that Paso is warm than it is a function of the current fashion in winemaking.

I won't say I've never enjoyed a wine that came in above 15%, but I can count them on one

hand and have fingers left over.



If most of us like the lower alcohol %. Why do winemakers keep making it with the higher %? Do some wine drinkers equate higher alc with better quality?

zenaidacellars


quality posts: 8 Private Messages zenaidacellars
aandrew667 wrote:I have a bottle in front of me right now.

It's 55% Cab, 35% Syrah, and 10% Zin

It's a screw cap (the 2006 was the last year they used corks)



You are correct, our 2007 Fire Sign is the first of it's lineage of Fire Sign's to receive the screw cap (though it prefers "Stelvin Closure" so it doesn't get picked on at recess by all those cork bullies). We actually switched all our wines for the 2007 vintage and beyond and they are working out great for us! Preserving that great Paso fruit while giving you, the buyer, a guarantee that when you open your bottle your wine won't have a long finish of moldy cork.

For the aging process, we let this guy sit in 100% new fine grain French oak barrels for approximately 18 months. The fruit is all estate and comes from the 22 acres that we have here on the property of the west-side of Paso Robles.

zenaidacellars


quality posts: 8 Private Messages zenaidacellars
bobrush12866 wrote:Priced at $37 per bottle on their website.

Club members get 20% off, plus an additional 5% if purchasing more than 4, or an additional 10% if purchasing 12 or more.

Based on this...It's a decent deal!



You are correct, here in the tasting room and online the Fire Sign has traditionally gone for $37 a bottle. We do have some additional discounts for wine club members and then for those that like to order larger amounts but none of those get down close to this price, especially with that $5 shipping. In the words of Chevy Chase before he's getting ready to jump in the pool in National Lampoons Vacation, "This is crazy, this is crazy, this is crazy!"

neilfindswine


quality posts: 173 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

Welcome Zenaida! Thanks for joining us today...

The Zenaida winery is located in the heart of the '46 West' area of Paso Robles which is one of my favorite areas to taste wine and take in the Paso scenery. Winemaker/proprietor Eric Ogorsolka is often on hand to field questions and discuss his winemaking philosophy...

I'm curious as to what we might expect in terms of the differences between this vintage and the '06 which we had on Woot in October....?

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

deaconbluez


quality posts: 1 Private Messages deaconbluez
olcubmaster wrote:What do you call 12 bottles of Zenaida Fire Sign Estate Cuvee?

Another case for Nick Danger, Third Eye!

...and no anchovies.



Do you have a key? I had to split mine with the sound man!

"I prefer a thief to a Congressman. A thief will take your money and be on his way, but a Congressman will stand there and bore you with the reasons why he took it." -Dr. Williams

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
redredwine67 wrote:If most of us like the lower alcohol %. Why do winemakers keep making it with the higher %? Do some wine drinkers equate higher alc with better quality?



The way I have always understood it is that they don't always have a choice. Consider the very basic fermenting process, sugar ferments into alcohol. The grapes develop their own sugar as they grow, which is dependent on the varietal, location, weather, harvest date etc. This sugar is then fermented and turned into alcohol. With that being said, dependent on the original sugar level in the fruit, if you want to stop the fermentation process at 13% alcohol, you could be left with some residual sugar, which would make the wine sweet, or sweet tasting. Obviously there are some things that can be done to reduce this sugar (ie harvesting at the right time) but it isn't always controllable. It's more about balance then an exact number.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

rpm


quality posts: 183 Private Messages rpm
North316 wrote:The way I have always understood it is that they don't always have a choice. Consider the very basic fermenting process, sugar ferments into alcohol. The grapes develop their own sugar as they grow, which is dependent on the varietal, location, weather, harvest date etc. This sugar is then fermented and turned into alcohol. With that being said, dependent on the original sugar level in the fruit, if you want to stop the fermentation process at 13% alcohol, you could be left with some residual sugar, which would make the wine sweet, or sweet tasting. Obviously there are some things that can be done to reduce this sugar (ie harvesting at the right time) but it isn't always controllable. It's more about balance then an exact number.



The question is not so simple. The level of sugar in the grapes at harvest is usually expressed as degrees Brix. Assuming you ferment pretty much dry, the Brix level at harvest will pretty much determine the level of alcohol. So far so good.

But, how do you determine the optimum degree Brix at which to harvest? You're looking for something called 'phenolic ripeness' - the flavors you want in the grape to be transformed into wine. Many things affect this, rootstock, pruning, canopy management, weather, irrigation or dry farming, etc. And, different winemakers will want different flavors. The current demand for wines with very ripe flavors - plummy, jammy, etc. descriptors means that grapes will be riper than they need to be if you want 'fresh berry' flavors.

And, you definitely want to avoid underripe grapes, because they may not have enough sugar to properly ferment and you can't add sugar to the must in the US (chaptalization). In Europe, the grapes don't always ripen, so they strive to get riper grapes. Our problem in California is the opposite. It is rare that the grapes don't ripen enough before harvest (but it does happen - think 1972 and 1977).

30-40 years ago, when almost all vinifera vines in California were on St.George rootstock, and most winemakers were looking for fresh flavors in grapes rather than the much riper flavors many winemakers prefer today, and given the different canopy management, pruning and caning, and irrigation (or lack thereof) practices of the time, most people were able to achieve appropriate phenolic ripeness between 22.5 and 24 degrees Brix for red wines. At that level, there tends to be a better balance of acid (you tend to see lower pH values with lower alcohols and more tannins - those are the wines, if properly made, which can age for decades).

Over the past 30 years, there has been a move towards other rootstocks (including planting vinifera on its own rootstock), some of which turned out to be less resistant to phylloxera than thought which led to a renewed outbreak a decade or so ago (but I digress). There are reasons for the move away from St.George rootstock, including St.George's susceptibility to leaf roll virus. The result of all these things is that many winemakers say they cannot achieve phenolic ripeness at less than 25 degrees Brix or higher, which will take you close to 15% alcohol. A wine with 15.5% alcohol will have been harvested around 25.5 degrees Brix.

Thus, it has become common to harvest grapes well above 24 Brix - sometimes as high as 26-27 - for wines that are supposed to be dry table wines. Complicating this is the weather - if you have a heat spell shortly before harvest, sugars can rise quickly - so quickly that even if you were planning to harvest at 24 Brix you might have higher Brix by the time you actually got started and higher Brix yet (maybe a whole degree, even more) by the time you got all the grapes in. Worse, if you'd planned to harvest a lot later and the weather changes, you may have trouble getting your crews in early. Depends on how you're harvesting, how big and skilled your crews are. Planning for picking is as much a highly developed art as it is science, and Mother Nature can upset your plans easily.

Such wines will be very high in alcohol (unless alchohol reduction techniques are used) and low in acid (unless acid is added) and, however pleasant they may be as young wines, they will not have the balance necessary for the wines to age harmoniously.

And the foregoing is just scratching the surface....

Because I've been drinking wine a very long time, and my palate was first methodically developed in the '50s and '60s (by oenologist relatives whose palates were developed in Europe in the late 19th century and who knew the pre-phylloxera wines), and because I have been able to observe what does and does not age well over the past 50+ years, I am a strong proponent of fresher grape flavors (except in Port-style wines) and lower alcohols, with good tannin and acid balance. Those are the wines that will go 10 years and develop bottle age subtleties in most cases, and in exceptional years and from good producers will go anywhere from 20-40+ years. Good 1970 Cabernet (which came in at ~13.5%) is faded now, but still more interesting than almost anything made in the 'modern' Parkerized style in the past 25 years.

Even for daily drinkers, I look for wines that run under 14%, though one cannot be hard and fast about it when so much of the California production is north of 14%.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316

And that my friends is the difference between 1 year of wine experience (me) and 60+ years wine experience (rpm). Thanks for the knowledge, never understood much of the details, but my very basic knowledge and understand was still correct, to a point, and thanks for acknowledging that.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

zenaidacellars


quality posts: 8 Private Messages zenaidacellars
jimjacks66 wrote:I brought a bottle to the 2012 Super Bowl party. The 2006 was hot (15.7% alcohol) but you would not know it when drinking. It probably has this alcohol % because of the Zin? The blend is unusual: Cabernet Sauvignon 55%, Syrah 35%, and Zinfandel 10%. Where will you find such a blend? Hard to describe but it had nice fruit, no noticeable alcohol and went well with the chicken wings (various hotness) served at the Superbowl Party. It also went well with the "gourmet" pizza a guest brought. It was versatile.

One might also say it went well with Madonna, MIA, LMFAO, Cee Lo, and Nicki Minaj. LOL



Glad to hear that it went well with chicken wings, "gourmet" pizza and Nicki Minaj. I think I might have to use that on the tasting sheet. It would have tasted even better if it was paired with a 49er's Super Bowl victory! (Someday we'll get there again)

Bendial80


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Bendial80

Am I the only one who doesn't care much about the drinking window? I pretty much drink these when they get shipped to my door lol.

zenaidacellars


quality posts: 8 Private Messages zenaidacellars
neilfindswine wrote:Welcome Zenaida! Thanks for joining us today...

The Zenaida winery is located in the heart of the '46 West' area of Paso Robles which is one of my favorite areas to taste wine and take in the Paso scenery. Winemaker/proprietor Eric Ogorsolka is often on hand to field questions and discuss his winemaking philosophy...

I'm curious as to what we might expect in terms of the differences between this vintage and the '06 which we had on Woot in October....?



Hey Neil,

We are located on the 46 West in Paso Robles in a micro-climate known as the Templeton Gap.

The 2006 Fire Sign and 2007 Fire Sign are both made up of 55% Cabernet Sauvignon, 35% Syrah, and 10% Zinfandel. They were both aged in 100% new French oak for 18 months and both contain the best fruit from that years harvest. The Fire Sign is an estate wine so the biggest difference comes down to the flavor profile that is the product of the conditions of that year. We have 22 acres of vines planted on the property and the wine is sustainably produced. In 2007 we noticed lower yields than the previous year but what we got was great stuff! Just a little brighter acidity, more concentrated flavors, and ultimately a wine that can stand up to a little longer aging than previous vintages.