bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee

So HAK bought a condo, he can't cook. I'm guessing he wants women to come over to his condo, and cooking is a good way to get them there. So I propose we all give HAK some very easy, very tasty recipes for him to impress the ladies with.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee

This is super easy and really very good.

1 package of chicken breasts
Salt
Olive Oil
Cheap Chardonnay (and I mean like the cheapest you can find)
Cast Iron or heavy duty skillet

Take the chicken breast and salt both sides
Pour some olive oil in a pan (just enough to coat the bottom)
When the oil shimmers add the chicken and cook until slightly brown on one side, then flip and repeat on the other side.
Pour in about half the bottle of cheap chardonnay and cook until it's gone, and which point your chicken will be finished and quite delicious.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

Imagine4vr


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Imagine4vr

ianchudson


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ianchudson
bhodilee wrote:This is super easy and really very good.

1 package of chicken breasts
Salt
Olive Oil
Cheap Chardonnay (and I mean like the cheapest you can find)
Cast Iron or heavy duty skillet

Take the chicken breast and salt both sides
Pour some olive oil in a pan (just enough to coat the bottom)
When the oil shimmers add the chicken and cook until slightly brown on one side, then flip and repeat on the other side.
Pour in about half the bottle of cheap chardonnay and cook until it's gone, and which point your chicken will be finished and quite delicious.



What temp or flame level do you set the stove?

oppsie


quality posts: 8 Private Messages oppsie

this is a standby in our house. I skip the relish, usually just east it over rice. Reserve the marinade and pour it on top once you flip the fish mid-broil.

Miso-marinated salmon

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
ianchudson wrote:What temp or flame level do you set the stove?



Enough to brown the chicken, on mine I go with medium low. If you go too high you end up with burnt chicken, once I add the wine I turn it up to medium. I almost never go above medium unless I'm boiling water. And when I boil water I put a little water in a pot, get it going, then fill my electric kettle with water, get it to a boil in the kettle and dump it in the pot. I'm very impatient.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

jwhite6114


quality posts: 119 Private Messages jwhite6114
bhodilee wrote:So HAK bought a condo, he can't cook. I'm guessing he wants women to come over to his condo, and cooking is a good way to get them there. So I propose we all give HAK some very easy, very tasty recipes for him to impress the ladies with.



1. Put the lime in the coconut
2. Shake 'em both up

What? You already know that one?

I'm out.

CT | | | | | |

ianchudson


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ianchudson
bhodilee wrote:This is super easy and really very good.

1 package of chicken breasts
Salt
Olive Oil
Cheap Chardonnay (and I mean like the cheapest you can find)
Cast Iron or heavy duty skillet

Take the chicken breast and salt both sides
Pour some olive oil in a pan (just enough to coat the bottom)
When the oil shimmers add the chicken and cook until slightly brown on one side, then flip and repeat on the other side.
Pour in about half the bottle of cheap chardonnay and cook until it's gone, and which point your chicken will be finished and quite delicious.



I did this tonight with 2-buck chuck syrah and other than coming out looking like giant grapes, this was fantastic. Thanks for the suggestion Bhodi.

nematic


quality posts: 6 Private Messages nematic
bhodilee wrote:This is super easy and really very good.



That sounds delicious and awesome. I, like HAK, have no skillz in the kitchen, but I want to try that this week - maybe tomorrow!

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
ianchudson wrote:I did this tonight with 2-buck chuck syrah and other than coming out looking like giant grapes, this was fantastic. Thanks for the suggestion Bhodi.



yeah I stuck with the Chard for color reasons. i bet they looked bizarre. We grilled chicken tonight. I've used the grill every day for the last two weeks. I love this time of year. I need to get some charcoal for the charcoal grill and do some slow cooking this weekend.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
nematic wrote:That sounds delicious and awesome. I, like HAK, have no skillz in the kitchen, but I want to try that this week - maybe tomorrow!



I am a huge believer in letting the meat talk. I don't like big marinades or lots of spices on meat unless it's part of a complete recipe, like Jambalya. Oh man I'm so making Jambalya this weekend.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee

If you're a fan of chili here's a way to make it taste like you slaved over it all day, but really takes like 25 minutes.

Ingredients:
meat (your choice, I like stew meat or hamburger)
Peppers (bell and hot, I like Habanero)
Onions
Garlic (real or granulated, never use garlic powder always granulated)
Canned whole tomatoes (they have to be whole)
Chili Beans, can be left out if you're a purist (I just buy the kind that come in chili spices already)
Dei Fratelli or V8 Vegetable juice (has to be Vegetable juice and preferably Dei Fratelli if it's sold in your area)
Chili Powder, Cumin and Cayenne

Okay, so you brown the meat off, drain most of hte fat, saute the onions and peppers for five minutes or so. Crush the tomatoes by hand and dump them in, then dump in the juice and add some garlic. Cook five minutes and then add the can of Vegetable juice and the chili powder and whatever to taste. Let it boil like crazy for 15 minutes and you've got all day flavor with no work. The vegetable juice really makes a huge difference in the taste. If you like thick chili mix in some corn bread mix. I also prefer my chili over cornbread instead of crackers. The sweet in the cornbread is a perfect counterpoint to the heat of the peppers. Petite Sirah screams for this dish.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

ianchudson


quality posts: 0 Private Messages ianchudson
bhodilee wrote:yeah I stuck with the Chard for color reasons. i bet they looked bizarre. We grilled chicken tonight. I've used the grill every day for the last two weeks. I love this time of year. I need to get some charcoal for the charcoal grill and do some slow cooking this weekend.



The purple was kind of fun, and it was still extremely good. The syrah makes the chicken taste fruit-bomb-ish and the cooking in oil then wine keeps it super moist. I ate it with a 1/2 lb of mixed veg and some asparagus.

I love summertime grilling and really wish I had a grill here in the city. I live on the 7th floor without a balcony, so skillets and george forman has to do.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
ianchudson wrote:The purple was kind of fun, and it was still extremely good. The syrah makes the chicken taste fruit-bomb-ish and the cooking in oil then wine keeps it super moist. I ate it with a 1/2 lb of mixed veg and some asparagus.

I love summertime grilling and really wish I had a grill here in the city. I live on the 7th floor without a balcony, so skillets and george forman has to do.



One of the best steaks I ever made came off a foreman grill. I was shocked as hell. Coat the outside with Olive Oil before you put them on the foreman and the outside will crisp up like it was on a real grill. Actually, anytime you grill or cook steak or the like in a pan, oil the food, not the pan. Chardonnay gives the chicken a really nice citrusy flavor like you had marinated it in lemon and lime overnight. And it does definetly keep it moist.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

MaskedMarvel


quality posts: 11 Private Messages MaskedMarvel
bhodilee wrote:This is super easy and really very good.

1 package of chicken breasts
Salt
Olive Oil
Cheap Chardonnay (and I mean like the cheapest you can find)
Cast Iron or heavy duty skillet

Take the chicken breast and salt both sides
Pour some olive oil in a pan (just enough to coat the bottom)
When the oil shimmers add the chicken and cook until slightly brown on one side, then flip and repeat on the other side.
Pour in about half the bottle of cheap chardonnay and cook until it's gone, and which point your chicken will be finished and quite delicious.



Bowtie - You nailed one of my favourite ways of doing chicken. I buy the big bags of frozen breasts from Costco and chuck them in (still frozen) with fresh ground pepper, a little paprika, CHEEEEEEEEAP sherry, and a can of Cream of Mushroom Soup in a skillet. Boil up some angel hair and make the sherry/COMS sauce just thick enough with a reduction... Put the chicken (usually sliced) over the pasta, drain (and SCRAPE!) the skillet over the chicken, sprinkle with shaved parm (much tastier than grated, though next time I'm shaving a cannonball instead), and maybe a little fresh herbs (basil, oregano, thyme, cilantro, you name it - whatever's convenient)... BLAMMO! Chicks dig it.

foobarski


quality posts: 2 Private Messages foobarski

This is what we had for dinner tonight:

1 box Zatarain's black beans and rice.
1 package Trader Joe's Spicy Chipotle chicken sausages.
Prepare the beans and rice per box directions. (Throw the contents of the box, water, and a little olive oil in a saucepan. Heat to boiling, cover, reduce heat, and simmer 25 minutes.
While it's simmering, chop the sausages into rounds or chunks. Pan-fry them with some frozen onions, and chopped garlic.
Throw the beans and rice and sausage together in a bowl. Serve with a dollop of sour cream (optional.)

Tonight w had it with the Stained Tooth Syrah.

"Is there anything a man don't stand to lose, when the devil wants to take it all away?
Cherish well your thoughts, and keep a tight grip on your booze.
Cause thinkin' and drinkin' are all I have today."
-- John Perry Barlow / Bob Weir ("Mexicali Blues")

HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42
MaskedMarvel wrote:Bowtie - You nailed one of my favourite ways of doing chicken. I buy the big bags of frozen breasts from Costco and chuck them in (still frozen) with fresh ground pepper, a little paprika, CHEEEEEEEEAP sherry, and a can of Cream of Mushroom Soup in a skillet. Boil up some angel hair and make the sherry/COMS sauce just thick enough with a reduction... Put the chicken (usually sliced) over the pasta, drain (and SCRAPE!) the skillet over the chicken, sprinkle with shaved parm (much tastier than grated, though next time I'm shaving a cannonball instead), and maybe a little fresh herbs (basil, oregano, thyme, cilantro, you name it - whatever's convenient)... BLAMMO! Chicks dig it.



This is actually very similar to what I believe my mom does a lot (and probably even with the sherry pretty often as she almost always has a bottle of it in the fridge). Though lately depending on what wine I had opened (or already had open) she would use some of that. But she always has those Costco chicken breasts in the freezer.
It's usually very good, especially since she's always experimenting with whatever things she has around. And I'm not even typically a big fan of chicken.

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 187 Private Messages MarkDaSpark

From Scott Harvey during his Trio week:


These things are not always easy to come by for most people, so I would recommend beef or lamb with rich Burgundian type sauses. I like to take a leg of local Amador County lamb and de bone it. Make a rub of olive oil, finely chopped rosemary, garlic, marjarom, salt and pepper and rub it all over the leg of lamb inside and out. Then, stuff it with a 50/50 mixure of blanched spinach and goat cheese. Tie it up and put it in a roasting pan surrounded by carrots, small red potatoes, shallots and what ever else you want. Pour a half a bottle of white wine in the roasting pan, cover and put it in the oven, 350 degrees. After a lot of the juices have roasted out of the lamb, drain them into a sause pan. Add a can of cranberry sauce to the sauce pan and reduce to a thick sauce. When you cut the lamb make sure you are careful to keep the slice whole so you can see the outer ring of lamb with the inner green and white stuffing. Serve the vegtables on the side and smother the whole thing with the sauce." - Scott Harvey



It got rave reviews from everyone, and doesn't sound hard to make.


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

rachel1782


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rachel1782

Do yourself a favor and get a slow cooker if you haven't already...it's foolproof. Just toss all the ingredients in and set it to cook for a few hours...they even make liners now to make clean-up easy.

My fave:

3 - 5 lbs boneless beef round or chuck -not ground hamburger meat
(check your groceries fliers for specials)
one can cream of mushroom
one can chicken broth
one can beef broth
1 lb bag of baby carrots
2 medium potatoes
1 package onion soup mix (think Knorr or Lipton)
1 cube beef boullion
salt, pepper, whatever other spices, herbs you like to taste

Here's what you do: cut up the potatoes, put the potatoes and carrots in the pot, put the roast on top, add the broth, put the boullion and soup mix on top of the roast, add whatever salt pepper spices you like, heap the cream of mushroom on top then set on low heat for 8 to 10 hours...and you're done!

It tastes great, takes little prep, and as a single person myself...I don't mind having it for leftovers for a couple of days.

MaskedMarvel


quality posts: 11 Private Messages MaskedMarvel
rachel1782 wrote:Do yourself a favor and get a slow cooker if you haven't already...it's foolproof. Just toss all the ingredients in and set it to cook for a few hours...they even make liners now to make clean-up easy.

My fave:

3 - 5 lbs boneless beef round or chuck -not ground hamburger meat
(check your groceries fliers for specials)
one can cream of mushroom
one can chicken broth
one can beef broth
1 lb bag of baby carrots
2 medium potatoes
1 package onion soup mix (think Knorr or Lipton)
1 cube beef boullion
salt, pepper, whatever other spices, herbs you like to taste

Here's what you do: cut up the potatoes, put the potatoes and carrots in the pot, put the roast on top, add the broth, put the boullion and soup mix on top of the roast, add whatever salt pepper spices you like, heap the cream of mushroom on top then set on low heat for 8 to 10 hours...and you're done!

It tastes great, takes little prep, and as a single person myself...I don't mind having it for leftovers for a couple of days.



Oh HELLZ YEAH - Crock pottin' is banging here in my place. Set it up before work and come home to a fantastic meal that'll leave leftovers for days. I've done the above with various cuts. DO NOT use green veggies in the crock, unless you like mush. I frequently hit Costco for the best local meat prices (pork tenderloin (I'm in NC) is only $2.50/lb).

A bangin' and easy setup -

A few pounds of brisket (remove as much fat as possible)
One ginormous Vidalia or similar onion.
Bottle of Bulls Eye BBQ Sauce
Random dry seasonings
One pack of Lipton Onion Soup Mix

Rub the meat with soup mix and seasonings after trimming and washing.
SPRAY THE INSIDE OF THE CROCK POT WITH PAM (I never have to use liners as long as I do this).
Spray BBQ sauce on the bottom of the pot.
Insert hunk of meat.
Cut up onion randomly and spread it around.
Put the rest of the BBQ sauce in there.
Put the CP on low for ~ten hours.

Resist the urge to peek. Steam up some veggies and rice/potatoes. Enjoy on sandwiches forever.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
rachel1782 wrote:Do yourself a favor and get a slow cooker if you haven't already...it's foolproof. Just toss all the ingredients in and set it to cook for a few hours...they even make liners now to make clean-up easy.

My fave:

3 - 5 lbs boneless beef round or chuck -not ground hamburger meat
(check your groceries fliers for specials)
one can cream of mushroom
one can chicken broth
one can beef broth
1 lb bag of baby carrots
2 medium potatoes
1 package onion soup mix (think Knorr or Lipton)
1 cube beef boullion
salt, pepper, whatever other spices, herbs you like to taste

Here's what you do: cut up the potatoes, put the potatoes and carrots in the pot, put the roast on top, add the broth, put the boullion and soup mix on top of the roast, add whatever salt pepper spices you like, heap the cream of mushroom on top then set on low heat for 8 to 10 hours...and you're done!

It tastes great, takes little prep, and as a single person myself...I don't mind having it for leftovers for a couple of days.



This would be great over rice, as a leftover I bet you could add some to a pan, add some milk and some paprika and have a decent hungarian type stew over rice.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

minnesotamoon


quality posts: 1 Private Messages minnesotamoon
bhodilee wrote:This is super easy and really very good.

1 package of chicken breasts
Salt
Olive Oil
Cheap Chardonnay (and I mean like the cheapest you can find)
Cast Iron or heavy duty skillet

Take the chicken breast and salt both sides
Pour some olive oil in a pan (just enough to coat the bottom)
When the oil shimmers add the chicken and cook until slightly brown on one side, then flip and repeat on the other side.
Pour in about half the bottle of cheap chardonnay and cook until it's gone, and which point your chicken will be finished and quite delicious.



we made this tonight. threw some whole garlic cloves, rosemary and peppers in there along with some fronterra chard and it was a hit. thanks!

"Wine drinkers make grape lovers"

JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON

Herbed Lentils & Rice

2 1/3 cups chicken or vegetable broth
¾ cup dry lentils
¾ cup chopped onion
½ cup brown rice
¼ cup dry white wine
½ teaspoon dried basil, crushed
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ teaspoon dried oregano, crushed
¼ teaspoon dried thyme, crushed
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon pepper
½ cup shredded swiss or jack cheese, + 8 thin strips


Combine the chicken or vegetable broth, lentils, onion, uncooked brown rice, wine, basil, salt, oregano, thyme, garlic powder, pepper and shredded cheese. Turn mixture into an ungreased 1½ quart casserole with a tight fitting lid. Bake, covered, in a 350 oven for 1½–2 hours or until lentils and rice are done, stirring twice.
Uncover casserole; top with cheese strips. Bake 2–3 minutes more or till cheese melts. If desired, garnish the top with watercress or sprigs of parsley. Makes 4 servings. (My family likes this so well, I usually double the recipe to ensure leftovers!)


Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON

Sloppy Lasagna

Prep and cook time: About 40 minutes
Makes: 4 servings

1¼ pounds uncooked mild or hot Italian turkey sausages
1 onion (about ½ lb.), peeled and chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed
8 ounces dried lasagna
2 cups fat-skimmed chicken broth
2 cups water
1 can (about 15 oz.) diced tomatoes
1 can (about 8 oz.) tomato sauce
½ teaspoon dried basil
½ teaspoon dried oregano
1 cup (4 oz.) shredded reduced-fat mozzarella cheese
Chopped parsley

1. Remove and discard sausage casings.
2. In a 4- to 5-quart nonstick pan over high heat, combine sausages, onion, and garlic. With a spoon, break meat into small pieces and stir often until mixture is browned, about 15 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, break the lasagna into 2- to 3-inch pieces.
4. To pan, add broth, water, tomatoes (with juice), tomato sauce, basil, oregano, and lasagna. Boil, stirring often, until pasta is tender to bite, about 15 minutes.
5. Ladle into wide bowls and sprinkle with cheese and parsley.

Per serving: 597 cal., 30% (180 cal.) from fat; 45 g protein; 20 g fat (6.4 g sat.); 60 g carbo (4 g fiber); 1,629 mg sodium; 86 mg chol.

From Sunset, January 1999, p. 115.

Notes:
2 cups broth is about 1 14½ ounce can.

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON

Dunbar Macaroni With Beef

Serves 8 to 10 (main course)
Active time: 1 hr Start to finish: 1½ hr

Nearly every cook in Newberry County makes his or her own rendition of Dunbar macaroni. In GOURMET's kitchens, we combined some favorite additions to the basic recipe to come up with this version.

1 lb boneless chuck, cut into ½-inch pieces
1 (14½-oz) can beef broth
1 (28- to 32-oz) can whole tomatoes in purée
1 medium onion, chopped
½ stick unsalted butter, melted
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
2 cups fresh bread crumbs
1 lb sharp Cheddar, grated (4 cups)
1 lb elbow macaroni


Simmer chuck in broth in a 2-quart saucepan, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until meat is very tender, about 1 hour.
While meat simmers, break up tomatoes by squeezing them into a bowl with purée. Cook onion in half of butter in a 4-quart saucepan over moderate heat, stirring, until softened. Add tomatoes with purée, Worcestershire sauce, and sugar, then simmer, stirring occasionally, 15 minutes, or until slightly thickened.
Preheat oven to 400F.
To make topping, toss together bread crumbs, 1 cup Cheddar, remaining melted butter, and salt and pepper to taste.
Cook macaroni in boiling salted water until al dente, then drain in a colander. Cool macaroni 3 minutes, then transfer to large bowl. Toss with tomato sauce, beef with broth, remaining 3 cups cheese, and salt and pepper to taste.
Transfer macaroni mixture to a buttered 13- by 9- by 2-inch glass baking dish and spoon topping evenly over. Bake in middle of oven, uncovered, 25 minutes, or until topping is golden brown and mixture is bubbling.

From Gourmet, February 2003, page 79.

Comments:
I use 16-oz of beef stock instead of the beef broth.
I couldn't find whole tomatoes in purée, so I used crushed tomatoes in purée.

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON

A Bureaucrat's Guide to Chocolate Chip Cookies
by Susan E. Russ
From the Washington Post

For those government employees and bureaucrats who have problems with standard recipes, here's one that should make the grade—a classic version of the chocolate chip cookie translated for easy reading.

Total Lead Time: 35 minutes.
Inputs:

1 cup packed brown sugar
½ cup granulated sugar
½ cup softened butter
½ cup shortening
2 eggs
1½ teaspoons vanilla
2½ cups all–purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
12–ounce package semi–sweet chocolate pieces
1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

Guidance:

After procurement actions, decontainerize inputs. Perform measurement tasks on a case–by–case basis. In a mixing bowl, impact heavily on brown sugar, granulated sugar, softened butter and shortening. Coordinate the interface of eggs and vanilla, avoiding an overrun scenario to the best of your skills and abilities.

At this point in time, leverage flour, baking soda and salt into a bowl and aggregate. Equalize with prior mixture and develop intense and continuous liaison among inputs until well–coordinated. Associate key chocolate and nut subsystems and execute stirring operations.

Within this time frame, take action to prepare the heating environment for throughput by manually setting the oven baking unit by hand to a temperature of 375 degrees Fahrenheit (190 degrees Celsius). Drop mixture in an ongoing fashion from a teaspoon implement onto an ungreased cookie sheet at intervals sufficient enough apart to permit total and permanent separation of throughputs to the maximum extent practicable under operating conditions.

Position cookie sheet in a bake situation and surveil for 8 to 10 minutes or until cooking action terminates. Initiate coordination of outputs within the cooling rack function. Containerize, wrap in red tape and disseminate to authorized staff personnel on a timely and expeditious basis.

Output:

Six dozen official government chocolate chip cookie units.

Comments:
From Simply Stated No. 25, April 1982. The monthly newsletter of the Document Design Center, American Institutes for Research, 1055 Thomas Jefferson Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007. (202)342-5000

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON

Black Bean Soup

2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 onion, diced
3 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon oregano
½ teaspoon chili powder
1 16-ounce can diced tomatoes
2 15-ounce cans black beans
2 cups chicken or vegetable stock or broth
1 bay leaf
2 tablespoons lime juice
salt and pepper or Tabasco sauce to taste
Optional garnishes: sour cream or yogurt, chopped cilantro, chopped green onions, and/or thin slices of avocado

Heat oil in a 2- or 3-quart pot. Sauté onion and garlic over medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Stir in cumin, oregano, and chili powder, and sauté for two more minutes.
Drain and discard liquid from tomatoes, and add them to the pot along with the black beans, stock and bay leaf. Bring soup to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 50 minutes. Add lime juice and simmer 10 more minutes. Remove bay leaf and discard. Taste soup and adjust seasonings by adding salt and either pepper or Tabasco as desired. (If you use canned broth, you may not need to add any salt.) Soup can be served chunky with whole beans, or pureed in a blender if you prefer a smoother consistency.
Serve black bean soup topped with sour cream or yogurt, and any of the other optional garnishes.
Preparation time: 5 minutes
Cooking time: 1 hour and 15 minutes
Makes 6 servings. Per serving: 160 calories, 6 g protein, 20 g carbohydrate, 7 g fat, 1,475 mg sodium, 12 mg cholesterol. Sodium content can be lowered considerably by using low-salt chicken broth and low-salt canned tomatoes.
From PG&E Spotlight, January 1996.

Notes:
2 cups broth is about 1 14½ ounce can.

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

oppsie


quality posts: 8 Private Messages oppsie

Thomas Bouchon's Favorite Simple Roast Chicken.

It's simple, and it will be your favorite too. It's divine, and it's easy.

WANT.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
minnesotamoon wrote:we made this tonight. threw some whole garlic cloves, rosemary and peppers in there along with some fronterra chard and it was a hit. thanks!



It is amazing how the simplest preparations can often yield the best results. I was cooking chicken, didnt' want to finish it in the oven, saw the open chard and dumped it in, turned out great on it's own. As you get more comfortable you can add all sorts of stuff to it. Had you added some canned tomato to that I bet it would have been ridiculous over pasta.

In fact, that's dinner tonight. I don't have to work tomorrow cause it's Arbor Day, and NE govt takes the day off. I love having a govmint job.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42

Thanks for all the recipes guys. After I'm all settled in and have some time in the evenings, I'll start compiling these into an electronic cookbook. Still haven't decided on the best format, but I'll work with it as I go through things. Also will be adding columns to the "database" that also list what types of wines go best with the various dishes (so if you guys have prefernces when you post a recipe, feel free to list that as well).
Also, a little reminder though most of you have already done this...give the directions as if I'm a 5 year old. As terms like simmer, sautee, add a little, low heat (unless the dial on the stove actually uses the word low), and general terminology like that doesn't mean a whole lot to me yet. I have the brain of an engineer/analyst. I need measurements, temperature settings, and specific times. At least to start off with.

Next will probalby need to be the thread to teach me how to shop for food. What brands to buy, how to do that whole coupon shopping thing, how long things last before they go bad, etc, etc. (though I'll probably get a lot of that info from my dear mommy )

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42

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joyironhorse wrote:As promised, here is a recipe for Blackberry Glazed Ribs to go with the Cabernet Franc.

Blackberry Glazed Baby Back Ribs

2 racks pork baby back ribs
3 T. kosher salt
1 T. light brown sugar
1 T. crushed black pepper
1 T. Ancho chili powder
¼ T. freshly ground nutmeg
3 T. grape seed oil
2 cups fresh blackberries
¼ cup cab franc
1 shallot
1 T. butter

Prepare ribs by removing membrane on backside. Mix together salt, sugar, black pepper, chili powder and nutmeg. Rub mixture into ribs, cover and refrigerate overnight. Remove ribs from refrigerator and let come up to room temperature while you light a mesquite fire in your grill (alternatively you can use a gas grill). Rub ribs all over with oil. When coals are ready, sear ribs over direct heat for 5 minutes on each side. Move coals to one side of grill (or turn off one side of gas) and cook ribs over indirect heat with the cover closed for about 1 hour. Meanwhile, melt butter in a small saucepan, chop shallot and add to butter, add berries and wine and cook for 10 minutes. Blend mixture and strain. Check for seasoning. Brush ribs with mixture the last 15 minutes of cooking time, remove ribs from bbq and let rest before slicing.



Just had to add this one for posterity, as it sounds pretty good...even to myself who's not a big ribs eater.

My Cellar
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cjsiege


quality posts: 14 Private Messages cjsiege

When you finally decide on a format, let me know. I put together a "beginners cookbook" for a friend a few years back. If I can rescue it from the dying computer, I can send a copy off to you - probably in format of choice.

HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42
cjsiege wrote:When you finally decide on a format, let me know. I put together a "beginners cookbook" for a friend a few years back. If I can rescue it from the dying computer, I can send a copy off to you - probably in format of choice.



If you find it, just let me know and I'll tell you where to send it. And I'll futz with it based on what info it has in it. As I know Excel better than I know Access, I'll most likely do it in Excel.
And the reason being that my original intention was to make columns of categories with general terms and then have it expand furhter to get more detailed recipes depending on what I'm in the mood for (or have the ingredients for).

For example, I did start one and from memory of what I did (I'll have to take another look later) I have a column that says "Type of Food" and that would list things like Fish, Meat, etc. Next column would be "Specific Type" such as Salmon, Talapia, Steak, Chicken. Next columns would start having things pertaining to the method of cooking such as Broiled, Baked, Roated, BBQ'd, etc. Then further columns would have specific ingredients lists and the directions next to them. And also listing what varietals of wines pair best with the dish.

And I would AutoFilter the header row so I could just make selections to narrow down what recipe I want to make that way.

Now this whole thing could end up being a bad format that won't logistically work out, but it's the initial plan so far. If I can come up with a better solution or method I may try that.

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
HitAnyKey42 wrote:If you find it, just let me know and I'll tell you where to send it. And I'll futz with it based on what info it has in it. As I know Excel better than I know Access, I'll most likely do it in Excel.
And the reason being that my original intention was to make columns of categories with general terms and then have it expand furhter to get more detailed recipes depending on what I'm in the mood for (or have the ingredients for).

For example, I did start one and from memory of what I did (I'll have to take another look later) I have a column that says "Type of Food" and that would list things like Fish, Meat, etc. Next column would be "Specific Type" such as Salmon, Talapia, Steak, Chicken. Next columns would start having things pertaining to the method of cooking such as Broiled, Baked, Roated, BBQ'd, etc. Then further columns would have specific ingredients lists and the directions next to them. And also listing what varietals of wines pair best with the dish.

And I would AutoFilter the header row so I could just make selections to narrow down what recipe I want to make that way.

Now this whole thing could end up being a bad format that won't logistically work out, but it's the initial plan so far. If I can come up with a better solution or method I may try that.



So, when you move in what kind of cookware are you gonna have? Cause that's important. Also are you cooking on an electric stove or gas?

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

Imagine4vr


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Imagine4vr

This is a great site, just check off the ingredients you have at home or want to use, and it gives all kinds of recipes you put together.

http://www.supercook.com/index.asp

HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42
bhodilee wrote:So, when you move in what kind of cookware are you gonna have? Cause that's important. Also are you cooking on an electric stove or gas?



Gas stovetop and gas double-oven.

As for cookware, I have no clue what I'm going to have yet. I know my mom has a bunch of stuff she plans to give me. And I know she's also planning on stopped this week on the way back from vacation at her mother's in Delaware (as there's no Sales Tax) to take a look around for stuff.
Only item I know for sure is that my realtor is giving me a George Foreman grill as a housewarming gift.

My mom has a lot of high end cookware, so I know she knows what to look for in cookware. I won't be able to afford much stuff of that quality yet, but I do plan to try to at least get a good frying pan and a good pot of some sort.

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
HitAnyKey42 wrote:Gas stovetop and gas double-oven.

As for cookware, I have no clue what I'm going to have yet. I know my mom has a bunch of stuff she plans to give me. And I know she's also planning on stopped this week on the way back from vacation at her mother's in Delaware (as there's no Sales Tax) to take a look around for stuff.
Only item I know for sure is that my realtor is giving me a George Foreman grill as a housewarming gift.

My mom has a lot of high end cookware, so I know she knows what to look for in cookware. I won't be able to afford much stuff of that quality yet, but I do plan to try to at least get a good frying pan and a good pot of some sort.



Gas is perfect, I like gas appliances. You should look at getting these It's porcelain coated cast iron so it's easy to clean and easy to care for. It's just as good as LeCreuset and only like 40 bucks. They're nice cause you can put them in the oven at up to 400 degrees. I'd get the 11 inch skillet at a minimum. I got that for Christmas and haven't used another pan since for anything but eggs. Then get a pretty cheap nonstick pan for things that need nonstick, like eggs. Since it's just you you should get that skillet, an 8 inch non stick, a like 3-4 qt sauce pot and a big pot for pasta/stews etc... Then get a 4 or 6qt crock pot, it will be your best friend. You'll also need two pairs of spring loaded tongs and just generic stuff like spatulas, those can all be cheap stuff. Sounds like your mom will be giving you most of the stuff to get you by. I'd just look into the Lodge Skillet, everything else you'll probably get. Or put it on a house warming gift list.

Oh, and start watching Good Eats on Food Network, you'll learn a lot. In fact just devote two or three hours a night to food network, it's pretty much the only channel I watch anymore.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

Loweeel


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Loweeel

Loweeel's first recipe:

Ingredients:
Boneless skinless chicken breasts
Salsa (I prefer hotter)
Dirt cheap gold "tequila"
salt, white/black/red (flakes) pepper, garlic (if not in salsa)
a bit of cilantro
liquid smoke (if you like smokey flavors; optional)
hot sauce (optional)

take the breasts, mix the salsa and tequila about 1:2-1:3, and submerge the chicken breasts in a container. Also add garlic, spices, etc.

Let sit in fridge for at least 2 days but up to 5.

Grill (or make on broiler pan), with chunky stuff from salsa on top of each breast (after flip if on grill, but microwave beforehand to heat it up and get rid of the chicken pathogens)

It's delicious.

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JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON
Loweeel wrote:Loweeel's first recipe:

Ingredients:
Boneless skinless chicken breasts
Salsa (I prefer hotter)
Dirt cheap gold "tequila"
salt, white/black/red (flakes) pepper, garlic (if not in salsa)
a bit of cilantro
liquid smoke (if you like smokey flavors; optional)
hot sauce (optional)

take the breasts, mix the salsa and tequila about 1:2-1:3, and submerge the chicken breasts in a container. Also add garlic, spices, etc.

Let sit in fridge for at least 2 days but up to 5.

Grill (or make on broiler pan), with chunky stuff from salsa on top of each breast (after flip if on grill, but microwave beforehand to heat it up and get rid of the chicken pathogens)

It's delicious.




When you say 1:3, do you mean one part salsa to 3 parts tequila? Because that's what I read that as.....

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

JOATMON


quality posts: 20 Private Messages JOATMON

Homemade Irish Cream

1¾ cup whiskey (rum, brandy, bourbon or scotch)
1 14oz. can sweetened condensed milk
1 cup (½ pint) whipping cream
4 eggs
2 Tbsp. chocolate syrup
1 tsp. vanilla
½ tsp. almond extract

Blend in blender. Does not need aging. Will keep up to 1 month if covered in refrigerator. Makes about 1 quart.


Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)