North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
JOATMON wrote:Anybody ever add garlic to their steak? Looking to add some sort of flavoring to them...



I usually do salt, pepper, garlic powder and sometimes onion powder, little extra salt while searing. Last time I also used fresh rosemary and some roasted garlic that we did in the oven the day before, it was excellent. I love garlic so I personally don't think fresh garlic would be overpowering, especially since you are cooking the steak for an extended period of time

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

klezman


quality posts: 178 Private Messages klezman
North316 wrote:Results?

Has anyone tried scallops yet? Going to give that a shot tonight I think



Yeah. Not worth it. They didn't blowtorch all that well, and a good hard sear is nicer than what you end up with, imo. If, otoh, you're going to throw smaller scallops into a pasta or something, then I bet cooking them sous vide would be ideal.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk

Roast Beef turned out awesome.

was on for about 8 or 9 hours @61. Then took out, put on 800 degree grill (before the most recent storm started), a minute or so then rotate, repeat 4 times. Then I actually put it back in a ziploc and submerged it again to keep warm for 30-40 minutes. Carved at table after soup and appetizer courses.







klezman


quality posts: 178 Private Messages klezman
joelsisk wrote:Roast Beef turned out awesome.

was on for about 8 or 9 hours @61. Then took out, put on 800 degree grill (before the most recent storm started), a minute or so then rotate, repeat 4 times. Then I actually put it back in a ziploc and submerged it again to keep warm for 30-40 minutes. Carved at table after soup and appetizer courses.



Looks delicious! Did the re-submersion affect the enjoyment of the post-cook searing?

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
klezman wrote:Looks delicious! Did the re-submersion affect the enjoyment of the post-cook searing?



Maybe only to make it not quite as crusty/crispy. Otherwise, I thought it was totally fine, and a brilliant way to keep it warm. Also gave me a chance to turn jus into gravy...

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

Looks good, and I did try the scallops, 35 min at 50.5C, super quick sear on both sides (15 seconds or so). I thought they came out wonderful, especially since I tend to overcook with normal searing techniques.

Side note, the famous balsamic from around here goes AWESOME with scallops.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
JOATMON wrote:Anybody ever add garlic to their steak? Looking to add some sort of flavoring to them...



Salt, Pepper. This is all a good steak needs. Though, if you're feeling fancy, roast some garlic, mix into some butter, top the steak with it after the sear. That's ok ;)

I have found, for longer sessions that the seasonings REALLY penetrate, so I've started either under or not at all seasoning and doing all that before the sear.

Suppose a stuffed pork chop would be good or would hte stuffing just turn into soggy nastiness? Cause I love me some sous vide pork chop. Maybe I'll cook it, stuff it, then sear it. That's probably the smart move.

Also, since this is trending long, I've started setting my chimney starter on the grill, firing it up, then putting the small grate from the charcoal grill on top and using the chimney starter itself as my grill for searing. I have no clue how hot it is, but it's gotta be damn near 900 or better. Things sear fast!

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee

think the code was luvmomwifi, it says on the page.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22

Going to try a beef roast Sunday for the first time. It is a 3.6 pound eye of round. How long would you recommend I have it in?

EDIT: Looking back I see that Bowtie did one for 36 hours. Did it take that long? Or is that how you prefer?

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
polarbear22 wrote:Going to try a beef roast Sunday for the first time. It is a 3.6 pound eye of round. How long would you recommend I have it in?

EDIT: Looking back I see that Bowtie did one for 36 hours. Did it take that long? Or is that how you prefer?



For that cut I would do exactly what joel did above

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22
North316 wrote:For that cut I would do exactly what joel did above


I got a response from Bowtie on FB, so I went with 31 hours at 142F, about 61C. I will update on how it came out tomorrow.

Just some salt, pepper and garlic. May add something before the sear.

Thanks for the input. I had an underdone steak on the first try, so SWMBO was unhappy with the Anova. I want to err on longer than come up short.

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
polarbear22 wrote:I got a response from Bowtie on FB, so I went with 31 hours at 142F, about 61C. I will update on how it came out tomorrow.

Just some salt, pepper and garlic. May add something before the sear.

Thanks for the input. I had an underdone steak on the first try, so SWMBO was unhappy with the Anova. I want to err on longer than come up short.



how did it turn out?

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22
joelsisk wrote:how did it turn out?


It came out as medium, not medium rare. So I need to use a lower temp I think. Also, the texture was a little soft. The beef broke down more than we would like. However, with that said, it was real tasty. A quick sear on 500-600 degree grill. Lots of au jus.

My wife is still not a big supporter. But she is happy with me experimenting more, and wants to try chicken and pork. So progress is happening.

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
polarbear22 wrote:It came out as medium, not medium rare. So I need to use a lower temp I think. Also, the texture was a little soft. The beef broke down more than we would like. However, with that said, it was real tasty. A quick sear on 500-600 degree grill. Lots of au jus.

My wife is still not a big supporter. But she is happy with me experimenting more, and wants to try chicken and pork. So progress is happening.



eye of round is a really tough cut, it's hard to do as medium rare and still be tender, as I've found to my chagrin. Chicken is the best reason to own one of these things. Go to the store and get the bone in split breasts when they're on sale. Lots of them, then cut the breast off the bone with the skin, use the bones to make stock and the fry the chicken skin side down when it comes out of the bag. It will be insanely good, you'll save money over boneless skinless breasts and you'll have stock!

Oh, and make sure your splatter screen is handy!!!!!! or I supose you could get the same effect from a moderately hot grill?

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

pseudogourmet98


quality posts: 31 Private Messages pseudogourmet98

The non-wifi version is on sale for $129.

klezman


quality posts: 178 Private Messages klezman
polarbear22 wrote:It came out as medium, not medium rare. So I need to use a lower temp I think. Also, the texture was a little soft. The beef broke down more than we would like. However, with that said, it was real tasty. A quick sear on 500-600 degree grill. Lots of au jus.

My wife is still not a big supporter. But she is happy with me experimenting more, and wants to try chicken and pork. So progress is happening.



61 C is squarely in the medium range, so that's unsurprising. Try to keep it at 55-57 for medium rare. There seems to be a tradeoff between texture and time - cook too long and things get mushy, but with tougher cuts you need enough time to let things tenderize. Since eye of the round is a relatively lean cut, probably go less time overall and keep it in the 55C range. Or just do a set of 12, 18, and 24 hours to compare the outcome. I'm thinking of trying that with brisket as well, but in the 36-72 hour range.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22
klezman wrote:61 C is squarely in the medium range, so that's unsurprising. Try to keep it at 55-57 for medium rare. There seems to be a tradeoff between texture and time - cook too long and things get mushy, but with tougher cuts you need enough time to let things tenderize. Since eye of the round is a relatively lean cut, probably go less time overall and keep it in the 55C range. Or just do a set of 12, 18, and 24 hours to compare the outcome. I'm thinking of trying that with brisket as well, but in the 36-72 hour range.


Where are you finding your temp ranges? Based on what I just saw, I think your values are more accurate than what I have. (Which are Fahrenheit of course.)

Thanks for the input. I will experiment again soon.

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
polarbear22 wrote:Where are you finding your temp ranges? Based on what I just saw, I think your values are more accurate than what I have. (Which are Fahrenheit of course.)

Thanks for the input. I will experiment again soon.



I've found this one to be fairly accurate. It is interesting though because the sous vide seems to have an effect that makes normal ranges seem more done then other methods. I've been doing my beef at 58.5C and to me that comes out what I feel like is true medium, maybe just leaning a little towards mid-rare. It is right on the edge of my where my wife would like it, but shes been okay with it so far.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

otolith


quality posts: 26 Private Messages otolith
pseudogourmet98 wrote:The non-wifi version is on sale for $129.



Purchased!

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
--John Muir

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22
North316 wrote:I've found this one to be fairly accurate. It is interesting though because the sous vide seems to have an effect that makes normal ranges seem more done then other methods. I've been doing my beef at 58.5C and to me that comes out what I feel like is true medium, maybe just leaning a little towards mid-rare. It is right on the edge of my where my wife would like it, but shes been okay with it so far.


Thank you. This is close to a chart I have. I will adjust for sous vide based on my experience and yours.

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
polarbear22 wrote:Where are you finding your temp ranges? Based on what I just saw, I think your values are more accurate than what I have. (Which are Fahrenheit of course.)

Thanks for the input. I will experiment again soon.



I like this one for quick reference chefsteps chart

this one for understanding. It also explains what happens over time... how longer times affect the meat.

There are a whole bunch more at the seriouseats site, that I love.

klezman


quality posts: 178 Private Messages klezman
joelsisk wrote:I like this one for quick reference chefsteps chart

this one for understanding. It also explains what happens over time... how longer times affect the meat.

There are a whole bunch more at the seriouseats site, that I love.



These are also the main references I use. The thing that stuck with me is that animal fat melts in the vicinity of 55 C, which is the definition of perfect medium rare: fat renders and makes the meat more flavourful.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

chipgreen


quality posts: 286 Private Messages chipgreen
North316 wrote:For that cut I would do exactly what joel did above


PM for you...

rjquillin


quality posts: 289 Private Messages rjquillin

~4# bone out lamb shank from Henry's klez and I picked up.
Six hours @ 53C + 2 @55C followed by a color-up on a 320+ grill for a few minutes a side.
Good red/pink color as I like, but not quite as tender as wold be desired. More time at 53, or 55?
Really don't want this to turn medium.

CT

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
rjquillin wrote:~4# bone out lamb shank from Henry's klez and I picked up.
Six hours @ 53C + 2 @55C followed by a color-up on a 320+ grill for a few minutes a side.
Good red/pink color as I like, but not quite as tender as wold be desired. More time at 53, or 55?
Really don't want this to turn medium.



Well...seeing as how neither of those temps are medium, that shouldn't be a problem. As noted before 55 is necessary for rendering and with that cut I would think more time is needed.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

klezman


quality posts: 178 Private Messages klezman
North316 wrote:Well...seeing as how neither of those temps are medium, that shouldn't be a problem. As noted before 55 is necessary for rendering and with that cut I would think more time is needed.



Agree on temp, not on time.
I had a companion of that lamb *leg* - not *shank* as those are massively different cuts to cook, either SV or traditionally. Mine was about 2.7 lbs, or more usefully, about 2.5" thick at the thickest part. I cooked it at 56.5C because I find the flovour of lamb improves at slightly higher doneness. I planned on about 2 hours, but other components of dinner were a little late so it was closer to 2h20m. Finished by propane blowtorch. Delightfully tender, delicious, and surface fat sufficiently rendered by the torch.

Lamb shank is a whole different beast. More like 57-58C for 1.5-3 days. Then use the exuded liquid to make a sauce. Best lamb shank you will ever have.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 289 Private Messages rjquillin
klezman wrote:Agree on temp, not on time.
I had a companion of that lamb *leg* - not *shank* as those are massively different cuts to cook, either SV or traditionally. Mine was about 2.7 lbs, or more usefully, about 2.5" thick at the thickest part. I cooked it at 56.5C because I find the flovour of lamb improves at slightly higher doneness. I planned on about 2 hours, but other components of dinner were a little late so it was closer to 2h20m. Finished by propane blowtorch. Delightfully tender, delicious, and surface fat sufficiently rendered by the torch.

Lamb shank is a whole different beast. More like 57-58C for 1.5-3 days. Then use the exuded liquid to make a sauce. Best lamb shank you will ever have.

Thanks for the correction.
I'll toss it back in for a bit with the elevated temp.
Taste was great, would have liked it just a bit more tender.
The juice made a great gravy.

CT

otolith


quality posts: 26 Private Messages otolith

Got my Anova yesterday! What should I cook first this upcoming Friday?

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
--John Muir

rjquillin


quality posts: 289 Private Messages rjquillin
otolith wrote:Got my Anova yesterday! What should I cook first this upcoming Friday?

rib cap or hanger.

CT

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
otolith wrote:Got my Anova yesterday! What should I cook first this upcoming Friday?



Skin on chicken breast. 145 for an hour. It will make you rethink chicken completely. Fry or grill skin side down only, to finish and crisp the skin.

Or pork chops. Medium rare pork chops!

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

klezman


quality posts: 178 Private Messages klezman
otolith wrote:Got my Anova yesterday! What should I cook first this upcoming Friday?



Steak. Any steak. Finish in screaming hot pan, on screaming hot grill, or with propane/propene blowtorch.

Chicken breast. ~61-63C, Either crisp up or not. Doesn't matter.

Pork tenderloin, about 60C.

This is the tip of the iceberg. Then do something like a long cook at medium rare to medium that'll be unlike anything you can generate any other way.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

otolith


quality posts: 26 Private Messages otolith

Have filets cooking! They are thicker than 2", so I'll plan on going a little longer than the recommended 45'.

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
--John Muir

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
otolith wrote:Have filets cooking! They are thicker than 2", so I'll plan on going a little longer than the recommended 45'.



what was the verdict?!

TaylorSwiftsHaircut


quality posts: 33 Private Messages TaylorSwiftsHaircut

Staff

I'm about to head home and start some chicken (for dinner tomorrow)in my sous vide.

Anyone have any favorite marinades?

I'm planning on a lemon+herb variety, but I'd love other more creative suggestions.

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
TaylorSwiftsHaircut wrote:I'm about to head home and start some chicken (for dinner tomorrow)in my sous vide.

Anyone have any favorite marinades?

I'm planning on a lemon+herb variety, but I'd love other more creative suggestions.



I honestly don't. It seems like anything I preseason REALLY takes on that flavor in the Sous Vide. I usually season post sear (aside from salt and pepper) or make a sauce based on what I'd usually use as a marinade. I had a bad experience with Worcestshire(sp?) sauce on a roast once. I love that stuff, but the entire roast was Lea and Perrins!

Edit: and you need to buy something or we're gonna assume you're a staff troll !

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

otolith


quality posts: 26 Private Messages otolith
joelsisk wrote:what was the verdict?!



Some of the best steaks we've ever had!

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
--John Muir

TaylorSwiftsHaircut


quality posts: 33 Private Messages TaylorSwiftsHaircut

Staff

bhodilee wrote:I honestly don't. It seems like anything I preseason REALLY takes on that flavor in the Sous Vide. I usually season post sear (aside from salt and pepper) or make a sauce based on what I'd usually use as a marinade. I had a bad experience with Worcestshire(sp?) sauce on a roast once. I love that stuff, but the entire roast was Lea and Perrins!

Edit: and you need to buy something or we're gonna assume you're a staff troll !



Interesting! I've had really good experiences with in-bag marinades and sauces. Granted, I've never done something as large as a roast...

And I know I need to buy something- I just can't figure out what I want yet! I have a pretty small apartment, and I already own a Dyson vacuum...

rjquillin


quality posts: 289 Private Messages rjquillin
TaylorSwiftsHaircut wrote:And I know I need to buy something- I just can't figure out what I want yet! I have a pretty small apartment, and I already own a Dyson vacuum...

Wine, if done correctly, takes up little room for a short time.

But I'm a very bad example, or perhaps a good one of what not to do...

You ~do~ drink wine, don't you?

CT

TaylorSwiftsHaircut


quality posts: 33 Private Messages TaylorSwiftsHaircut

Staff

rjquillin wrote:Wine, if done correctly, takes up little room for a short time.

But I'm a very bad example, or perhaps a good one of what not to do...

You ~do~ drink wine, don't you?



I do drink wine! Not every day, but at least once a week with dinner or while out with friends.

klezman


quality posts: 178 Private Messages klezman
TaylorSwiftsHaircut wrote:I do drink wine! Not every day, but at least once a week with dinner or while out with friends.



Hang out here and hopefully we'll fix that!

I stopped counting bottles. My CT