bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
kaolis wrote:What specific cut/roast did you use? Size? Thanks!



Some variety of Chuck, bout 4 pounds or so.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman
North316 wrote:I haven't quite figured that out yet honestly, but I assume the dry mode is more sensitive. Think something dry like cereal, takes all of the air out without crushing the cereal (since it is porous).



I think it's the other way around. Even with some juicier cuts of meat sometimes the vacuum will get moisture coming into the catch tray. I would guess that the wet setting would increase sensitivity (i.e. pull less vacuum) so that the liquid stays in the bag. Mine doesn't have that setting, though, so it's just speculation.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee

I think this is the one I'm gonna get.

http://www.foodsaver.com/vacuum-sealers/the-foodsaver-gamesaver-bronze/FSGSSL2835-000.html

To lazy to link as on tablet. Lifetime warranty for 100 bucks sells me.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22
bhodilee wrote:I think this is the one I'm gonna get.

http://www.foodsaver.com/vacuum-sealers/the-foodsaver-gamesaver-bronze/FSGSSL2835-000.html

To lazy to link as on tablet. Lifetime warranty for 100 bucks sells me.


Same brand we have been using, though different model.

Looked at warranty. "Limited Lifetime" is until 5 years after they announce the model is discontinued. Pretty long still.


polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22
klezman wrote:I think it's the other way around. Even with some juicier cuts of meat sometimes the vacuum will get moisture coming into the catch tray. I would guess that the wet setting would increase sensitivity (i.e. pull less vacuum) so that the liquid stays in the bag. Mine doesn't have that setting, though, so it's just speculation.


It does seem to stop a little sooner. When I do seal smoked pork, there is sometimes some liquid. So I use the wet setting.

We also find that freezing food first and then sealing will keep delicate items from getting crushed.

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
polarbear22 wrote:Same brand we have been using, though different model.

Looked at warranty. "Limited Lifetime" is until 5 years after they announce the model is discontinued. Pretty long still.



Well then! Wonder if that's coming up as it's the deal of the week? Still five years when the reviews point to food savers only lasting a few. Winner!

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

Chuck steak last night. Did 24 hours at 63C. It was delicious, though after a quick sear it was well done. I should have known better since it was a little less than an inch thick. Next time I will definitely go lower on the temp.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee

I went ahead and pulled the trigger on a Foodsaver. My second place of employment nets me a great discount on the bags so I'm set now! Might do some more chicken tonight. I love how Anova does chicken. I think in the near future I'm gonna cut up a turkey, back white and dark and cook them up as a dry run for Thanksgiving.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
North316 wrote:I haven't quite figured that out yet honestly, but I assume the dry mode is more sensitive. Think something dry like cereal, takes all of the air out without crushing the cereal (since it is porous).



Actually, I think it's just the opposite... Wet uses less vacuum "pressure" as it gets close to limit/seal, so it slows and doesn't suck out all the juice. Dry uses full vacuum "pressure" until limit/seal.
I have this one from costco, btw, and it sits on my counter.

Also, I really like the bag attachment. I didn't think I would, nor use it much, but the ability to put food in a bag, vacuum it, freeze, pull out of freezer, take what I want, re-vacuum, and stick it back in the freezer, is kind of awesome. You can't do that with the rolls... unless someone knows of a roll with spaced out vacuum ports.

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk

My first attempt was a london broil that came out awesome.

Second attempt was a 9 pound beef shoulder - cut into a number of pieces, put into bags - for 48 hours @61.



Seared and served 3 lbs, put 4 remaining bags straight into freezer. Delicious with no seasoning. Also, with all the au jus, it was much more brown than grey like some images I've seen.

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

Looks good Joel, and I agree, my chuck steak was certainly more brown than grey.

I just ordered two Cambro's and lids so little geeked to get them. 18x12x9 and 12x12x8. Slightly pricier than I was hoping for, but with the lids and shipping it was $45, so not too bad. I just need to find wire racks to fit in them for proper circulation, so I don't have to clip bags to the side (can't do that with the lid).

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
North316 wrote:Looks good Joel, and I agree, my chuck steak was certainly more brown than grey.

I just ordered two Cambro's and lids so little geeked to get them. 18x12x9 and 12x12x8. Slightly pricier than I was hoping for, but with the lids and shipping it was $45, so not too bad. I just need to find wire racks to fit in them for proper circulation, so I don't have to clip bags to the side (can't do that with the lid).



you mean something like these?

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:Looks good Joel, and I agree, my chuck steak was certainly more brown than grey.

I just ordered two Cambro's and lids so little geeked to get them. 18x12x9 and 12x12x8. Slightly pricier than I was hoping for, but with the lids and shipping it was $45, so not too bad. I just need to find wire racks to fit in them for proper circulation, so I don't have to clip bags to the side (can't do that with the lid).



Saran wrap wouldn't do the job?

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
bhodilee wrote:Saran wrap wouldn't do the job?



versus the lids? Sure it would work, as does the foil I currently use. But once I cut-out the lids to fit the anova, these will be a lot less hassle than using saran wrap or foil hundreds of times. The lids were only $10 total.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
joelsisk wrote:you mean something like these?



I saw those, but I will likely just use a standard bakers rack on the bottom, and if necessary configure a "second story" rack. Those are a cool idea, but I think I could buy a "rib smoker rack" for significantly less and have the same function

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman

Do you guys have trouble with leaving things just free-floating? Or sinking, as the case may be. It's never been an issue for me. Even cooks, nothing gets caught.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 287 Private Messages rjquillin

CT

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
rjquillin wrote:



Yep.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
klezman wrote:Do you guys have trouble with leaving things just free-floating? Or sinking, as the case may be. It's never been an issue for me. Even cooks, nothing gets caught.



In my experience things sink. I was under the impression that circulation is needed around the whole thing for proper, even cooking (probably not as big of a deal as I anticipate, but better safe than sorry). I was clipping things to keep them from sitting on the bottom. When I have a lid, I will not be able to do that, hence the rack.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
North316 wrote:In my experience things sink. I was under the impression that circulation is needed around the whole thing for proper, even cooking (probably not as big of a deal as I anticipate, but better safe than sorry). I was clipping things to keep them from sitting on the bottom. When I have a lid, I will not be able to do that, hence the rack.



Also probably more important for shorter (2-4 hour) cook times... don't think it matters much for 24+ hour stews....

When I did that 9 lb shoulder, it was a hugely full pot, and I didn't clip anything, though I did try to switch positions every 8-12 hours or when I thought about it...

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee

Did this get posted? I'm currently reading through it.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk
bhodilee wrote:Did this get posted? I'm currently reading through it.


not sure it was posted, but I love that site. Use it regularly.

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

My containers are set to arrive this tomorrow, so I should hopefully have the rig all set-up this weekend. Pics will be forthcoming. We've been doing chicken breasts to store in the fridge and use with ball jar salads (preserved with foodsaver). Looking forward to being able to make the chicken in much larger batches.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:My containers are set to arrive this tomorrow, so I should hopefully have the rig all set-up this weekend. Pics will be forthcoming. We've been doing chicken breasts to store in the fridge and use with ball jar salads (preserved with foodsaver). Looking forward to being able to make the chicken in much larger batches.



my foodsaver just got delivered! making my life easier as well

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

Also, much happier with this second batch of chicken (chilled afterwards to put on salads). Didn't do much different than the last time, but it seems to be even moister, better flavor, and a better texture. I did add more rub to it. I was hesitant the first time as people said that any spices were intensified in the sous vide. I did not find that to the case with the chicken and was much more liberal in my application this time.

I still don't like the idea of low temps on chicken, and still want a hint of that "stringy" texture, so I went with 64.5C (~149F) for about 2.5 hours and then immediately into an ice bath afterwards for 30-45min. I think the ice bath helped lock in the moisture, but who know.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:Also, much happier with this second batch of chicken (chilled afterwards to put on salads). Didn't do much different than the last time, but it seems to be even moister, better flavor, and a better texture. I did add more rub to it. I was hesitant the first time as people said that any spices were intensified in the sous vide. I did not find that to the case with the chicken and was much more liberal in my application this time.

I still don't like the idea of low temps on chicken, and still want a hint of that "stringy" texture, so I went with 64.5C (~149F) for about 2.5 hours and then immediately into an ice bath afterwards for 30-45min. I think the ice bath helped lock in the moisture, but who know.



I've only ever noticed the spice overwhelming on a multi day cook, and specifically, for me, it was Worcestire sauce that really got in there. Rubs, not had much issue with. In fact, rubs generally just soak off I think. I've been putting seasonings on after I take whatever out.

Love Sous Vide Chicken. Can't wait to break down a turkey and try it.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee

yeah, so it turns out that foodsaver is beep-boop-bip-do-beeping gigantic. Holy shit. It "flips up for easy storage" yet is still takes up more room than my massive blender and coffee pot. I'm gonna borrow a page from North and store it in the spare bedroom.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22

Spent over 30 minutes trying to set up Wi-Fi. Finally decided it may not like the 5G channel the iPad uses. That did the trick.

First use tomorrow, a pair of rib-eyes. Not as thick as recommended, so I hope the sear does not overcook. My wife left it to me to use first time. Still not excited by it. So her present may include me cooking her more meals with the Anova.

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
polarbear22 wrote:Spent over 30 minutes trying to set up Wi-Fi. Finally decided it may not like the 5G channel the iPad uses. That did the trick.

First use tomorrow, a pair of rib-eyes. Not as thick as recommended, so I hope the sear does not overcook. My wife left it to me to use first time. Still not excited by it. So her present may include me cooking her more meals with the Anova.



How thick? My chuck steak was a little under an inch and it definitely overcooked with the sear (but it was still was still wonderfully moist and tender). If they are less than an inch, I would just go a little lower on your sous vide temp then you were otherwise planning to.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
North316 wrote:My containers are set to arrive this tomorrow, so I should hopefully have the rig all set-up this weekend. Pics will be forthcoming. We've been doing chicken breasts to store in the fridge and use with ball jar salads (preserved with foodsaver). Looking forward to being able to make the chicken in much larger batches.



I love the container, though I will admit the lid appears to be a much stronger material than I was expecting. Trying to make my plan of attack to notch out the hole. Best recommendation I have read so far is to use a hole saw drill bit, but that would require another $10-15 investment, hah.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman
polarbear22 wrote:Spent over 30 minutes trying to set up Wi-Fi. Finally decided it may not like the 5G channel the iPad uses. That did the trick.

First use tomorrow, a pair of rib-eyes. Not as thick as recommended, so I hope the sear does not overcook. My wife left it to me to use first time. Still not excited by it. So her present may include me cooking her more meals with the Anova.



Just use the absolute hottest thing you can to get the crustification as quickly as possible. Whether that's cast iron (use oil to ensure heat conductivity), a grill, or a torch, just crank it up to 11.

We're cooking a 1.25" thick rib steak at the moment. 55 C (that's 131 F to some of you), then either a quick sear in the pan or we'll torch it.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

joelsisk


quality posts: 11 Private Messages joelsisk

Made chicken breasts (with bones, skin) last Friday. I have to say it was disappointing. Cooked just over 3 hours @ 145, per the seriouseats recommendation. I think I'll try it at 2 hours @140 next time. It wasn't bad, but no where near the medium, non-stringy chicken texture described. Also, not as moist as I was expecting.

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
joelsisk wrote:Made chicken breasts (with bones, skin) last Friday. I have to say it was disappointing. Cooked just over 3 hours @ 145, per the seriouseats recommendation. I think I'll try it at 2 hours @140 next time. It wasn't bad, but no where near the medium, non-stringy chicken texture described. Also, not as moist as I was expecting.



Unless it was gigantic, 3 hours is way longer than needed for chicken you plan on eating right away. I think most people do an hour and a half or so but I could be wrong.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

rjquillin


quality posts: 287 Private Messages rjquillin
joelsisk wrote:Made chicken breasts (with bones, skin) last Friday. I have to say it was disappointing. Cooked just over 3 hours @ 145, per the seriouseats recommendation. I think I'll try it at 2 hours @140 next time. It wasn't bad, but no where near the medium, non-stringy chicken texture described. Also, not as moist as I was expecting.

Similar results last night; 63C for under two hours. Need to back off on either time or temp. Taste was fine, but overall just didn't match the hype.

CT

tytiger58


quality posts: 82 Private Messages tytiger58
rjquillin wrote:Similar results last night; 63C for under two hours. Need to back off on either time or temp. Taste was fine, but overall just didn't match the hype.



I cook my chicken and 143 for 1 hour and it is perfect.

What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch? ~ W. C. Fields

“Freedom is something that dies unless it's used” Hunter S Thompson




bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
polarbear22 wrote:Spent over 30 minutes trying to set up Wi-Fi. Finally decided it may not like the 5G channel the iPad uses. That did the trick.

First use tomorrow, a pair of rib-eyes. Not as thick as recommended, so I hope the sear does not overcook. My wife left it to me to use first time. Still not excited by it. So her present may include me cooking her more meals with the Anova.



I do steaks 118 so I can sear. Works great.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman
joelsisk wrote:Made chicken breasts (with bones, skin) last Friday. I have to say it was disappointing. Cooked just over 3 hours @ 145, per the seriouseats recommendation. I think I'll try it at 2 hours @140 next time. It wasn't bad, but no where near the medium, non-stringy chicken texture described. Also, not as moist as I was expecting.



Agreed with Ron. 140 F/60 C will do it just fine, and for regular sized pieces of meat you only need 1-1.5 hours to reach temp. Add a bit more time if you feel the need to pasteurize. If you're eating it right away, though, no need.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

InFrom


quality posts: 48 Private Messages InFrom

Well, the bursting cabinets in my kitchen are the main reason I don't see getting one of these toys, but I did treat myself to a good thermometer recently. Tonight I had my second effort at salmon fillet in the beer cooler, following Kenji's post. I kept it at 115 for 45 minutes -- it's a lot easier with the thermometer! Then a quick sear on cast iron. Really good, and a big improvement over my first attempt.

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22

I cooked two bone-in ribeyes yesterday. About 70 minutes at 129. Then seared on a 600 degree grill for a minute or so per side. One came out perfect medium rare. The second was a little too rare near the bone. Any thoughts on what I should do to ensure both come out perfect?

I am thinking I should have just had more time. Second thoughts are to have the steak with bone down to make sure it is fully immersed.

SWMBO is still a skeptic, as her steak was the one that was not uniformly cooked. But I think she will let me do more experimentation.

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
polarbear22 wrote:I cooked two bone-in ribeyes yesterday. About 70 minutes at 129. Then seared on a 600 degree grill for a minute or so per side. One came out perfect medium rare. The second was a little too rare near the bone. Any thoughts on what I should do to ensure both come out perfect?

I am thinking I should have just had more time. Second thoughts are to have the steak with bone down to make sure it is fully immersed.

SWMBO is still a skeptic, as her steak was the one that was not uniformly cooked. But I think she will let me do more experimentation.



Easy enough, get a thicker steak and split it or just each eat a thicker steak

Seriously though, getting one thicker steak and splitting it is preferable to two skinny steaks.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)