cmaldoon


quality posts: 62 Private Messages cmaldoon

Holy crud folks.

If this were 4 bottles of wine NOBODY would be complaining. And yet you can go to the market and buy wine for $2 per bottle.

Just like wines, there is an art and style that goes in to each one. You can't simply compare this one to some random highly distributed bottle you find at the supermarket.

Think of this as a 12 pack of porch sipping white wines for about $7 per bottle (22 oz is ~ 90% of 750 ml). In that comparison, this is a cheap offering.

Now if everyone could stop being cheap and could start asking real questions about the product, this whole thread would work better.

Hey RBW!
1) what's the blend of the 3 apples and how the heck did you come to that combo?

2) what's the connection between RBW wines and this cider?

2014 - 20 Btl. Fjellene (10 bot), Urraca Chard (10 bot)
Last purchase: 5/3/14

2013 - 75 btl. 2012 - 98 btl. 2011 - 112 btl. 2010 - 30 btl.
My Cellar

sirlordford


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sirlordford
TheSquareBear wrote:http://www.binnys.com/beer/Crispin_Cider_Original_53704.html
seven dollars fifty cents divided by forty-eight ounces equals fifteen point six cents per/oz.

vs.

eighty dollars divided by two hundred sixty-four ounces equals thirty point three cents per/oz.

~YOU do the math



Irrelevant - In store only.

selira


quality posts: 0 Private Messages selira
TheSquareBear wrote:I'd be interested in trying this, but not for that exorbitant price. Even at being 22oz bottles, that's like twenty dollars for a six pack! You can get Woodchuck six pack for around $10-ish.

And supposedly this is 39% below retail???
Look, I like spending mah money on boozahol as much as anyone, but C'mon! This had better be some friggin' amazing hooch! for that kinda coin.
amiright?



This was exactly my thought. I brew my own hard cider at home, and it's rare that I meet up with a commercial product I like as well as what I brew. Barring single bottles or something at a bar (which are obviously marked up from case prices), I have NEVER paid prices like this for cider (per ounce), and I will go out of my way to try new and interesting ones that float through my local specialty shops.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus

I have a bottle of this. I feel like crap. I'll open the bottle in a couple hours.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

hosesplus


quality posts: 0 Private Messages hosesplus

It's just spring now, unless I've warped to the southern hemisphere, but then Julian CA wouldn't be just 66km away.
Wait a minute, km? What's a km doing in CA? Are you al-quaeda?

FIGHTING CRIME AND INDIFFERENCE SINCE 8:32 THIS MORNING

pseudogourmet98


quality posts: 16 Private Messages pseudogourmet98
kylemittskus wrote:I have a bottle of this. I feel like crap. I'll open the bottle in a couple hours.


Maybe the cider has magical medicinal powers and you will feel better! Oh wait, that's bio-dynamic wines. Sorry.

raisedbywolves


quality posts: 34 Private Messages raisedbywolves
cmaldoon wrote:Holy crud folks.

If this were 4 bottles of wine NOBODY would be complaining. And yet you can go to the market and buy wine for $2 per bottle.

Just like wines, there is an art and style that goes in to each one. You can't simply compare this one to some random highly distributed bottle you find at the supermarket.

Think of this as a 12 pack of porch sipping white wines for about $7 per bottle (22 oz is ~ 90% of 750 ml). In that comparison, this is a cheap offering.

Now if everyone could stop being cheap and could start asking real questions about the product, this whole thread would work better.

Hey RBW!
1) what's the blend of the 3 apples and how the heck did you come to that combo?

2) what's the connection between RBW wines and this cider?



Several years ago we made a fresh cider from peeler apples from a packing shed in Yakima. Being that I like to ferment things I sat some aside and started experimenting. After many batches, trials and error with different blends, we found using Grannies, Goldens and Galas was a perfect blend that expressed true apple character, refreshing not to sweet with a hint of acidity.

As for why, just trying to fill a niche in our wineries portfolio for the cowboy who doesn't drink wine.


rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
raisedbywolves wrote:Finn River, Tieton Cider Works, Blue Mountain Cider, Julian just to name a few all retail over $7/bottle or more plus shipping and handling charges.

RBW, thanks for joining in what has become a bit more of a fray here than normal, hopefully you can field a few additional questions.

First off, I had absolutely no idea what to expect, and that was why I grabbed a bottle of something that seemed a comparable cider, the Julian.

I found them quite similar, but as this was my first experience with hard cider, it's likely I don't know what I'm tasting for, and would like your comments.
Just what makes a quality product?
Ho should it be consumed?
What is it supposed to taste like?
How should the (natural?) carbonation present itself and last?
Must a bottle be consumed in a single sitting?

This apple juice is likely new territory here for many of us used to grape juice.

I did do some webz research to try to answer some of my questions, and found an interesting piece HERE on some history and products and a second one, generally parroting the first, but with serving suggestions HERE.

The Attila, sampled next to the Julian, was different, but they were both so similar, and so different from what I generally drink, I don't have the vocabulary to convey the differences.
In wine terms, I think I'd have to call both dry, perhaps only slightly tending to off dry for the Attila where the Julian is clearly more tart.
Is RS something we can talk about here?

So, one of those articles mentioned cider was frequently the first drink of the day; I'm game.

Got a 'pop' upon opening both, and they still have fizz, but it is substantially diminished; no frothy head following the pour.
Nose about the same as I recall from last night, still a bit yeasty and somewhat reminds me of an un-aromatic lite beer. I don't drink a lot of beer either, but when I do it's a dark one.
Still crisp like last night, and there is little if any perception of alcohol.
Do we talk pH or TA?
How ~so~ we compare cider?
That metallic tinge I got last night seems absent this morning. Perhaps a reaction with something I'd eaten.
They both still have a 'finish' I'm not fond of however.

Again, thanks for stopping by.
Hoping I can learn something here today.

My coffee awaits consumption.

[edit]
A final comment.
Very poor form to have neither your
http://www.elevagewineco.com/
or
www.AttilaHardCider.com
web sites functional.

CT

Cyradia


quality posts: 29 Private Messages Cyradia
rjquillin wrote:
First off, I had absolutely no idea what to expect, and that was why I grabbed a bottle of something that seemed a comparable cider, the Julian.



Just wanted to tip my hat to RJQuillin here...

1) Great review. I find the negative reviews harder to post than the positive ones, but they're just as (if not more) important to me as a fellow wooter.

2) Mad props on seeking out a second Cider to compare it to. Greatly appreciated and above and beyond the call of duty.

3) I love the questions to RBW above and I hope they get answered.

rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
Cyradia wrote:1) Great review. I find the negative reviews harder to post than the positive ones, but they're just as (if not more) important to me as a fellow wooter.

But it's not (intended to be) a negative review, IMO, as both the Julian and the Attila were comparable to one another, apart from the differing sweetness.
I truly had no expectation and needed a benchmark.
What I've learned here so far is I just don't think I'm a fan of this style cider, or perhaps hard cider in general.

I did find HERE some tasting notes from Paste Magazine of some they deemed truly bad, and a couple that sound interesting I'll try to source, if for no other reason to see if there is some style I may prefer.

CT

chipgreen


quality posts: 185 Private Messages chipgreen
Cyradia wrote:Just wanted to tip my hat to RJQuillin here...

1) Great review. I find the negative reviews harder to post than the positive ones, but they're just as (if not more) important to me as a fellow wooter.

2) Mad props on seeking out a second Cider to compare it to. Greatly appreciated and above and beyond the call of duty.

3) I love the questions to RBW above and I hope they get answered.


+1 x3

Jerry559


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Jerry559
MarkDaSpark wrote:Watchu Talkin 'bout, Willis?

Perhaps you failed math. Price point here on Wine.Woot is around $6.92 a bottle ($77.99 + $5 shipping = $82.99 total, then divided by 12 makes it $6.92 a bottle). Which makes it at least $2 below your Crispin's craft ciders.

I do seem to recall seeing a retail price point around $16, which would be above it, but that's not the Woot price.


Sorry, but one of my pet peeves is someone who doesn't do the math right.





Your math is correct. I was into the whiskey last night and didn't do the math at all.

lec235


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lec235

In terms of alcohol, where people who like white wine reach for white wine, I'll generally reach for cider. I prefer to drink it chilled, usually out of a pint glass, sometimes a goblet.

That being said, on the sweet-to-dry scale, where how would this compare to, say, the Crispin Honey Crisp? I choose that one because it's fairly widespread vs my current favorite local cider which I'd be *highly* surprised to find west of the Ohio River. I'm glad Woot is branching out, its just ciders (for me) are a lot more difficult to based on the general notes in the description than wine.

raisedbywolves


quality posts: 34 Private Messages raisedbywolves
rjquillin wrote:RBW, thanks for joining in what has become a bit more of a fray here than normal, hopefully you can field a few additional questions.

First off, I had absolutely no idea what to expect, and that was why I grabbed a bottle of something that seemed a comparable cider, the Julian.

I found them quite similar, but as this was my first experience with hard cider, it's likely I don't know what I'm tasting for, and would like your comments.
Just what makes a quality product?
Ho should it be consumed?
What is it supposed to taste like?
How should the (natural?) carbonation present itself and last?
Must a bottle be consumed in a single sitting?

This apple juice is likely new territory here for many of us used to grape juice.

I did do some webz research to try to answer some of my questions, and found an interesting piece HERE on some history and products and a second one, generally parroting the first, but with serving suggestions HERE.

The Attila, sampled next to the Julian, was different, but they were both so similar, and so different from what I generally drink, I don't have the vocabulary to convey the differences.
In wine terms, I think I'd have to call both dry, perhaps only slightly tending to off dry for the Attila where the Julian is clearly more tart.
Is RS something we can talk about here?

So, one of those articles mentioned cider was frequently the first drink of the day; I'm game.

Got a 'pop' upon opening both, and they still have fizz, but it is substantially diminished; no frothy head following the pour.
Nose about the same as I recall from last night, still a bit yeasty and somewhat reminds me of an un-aromatic lite beer. I don't drink a lot of beer either, but when I do it's a dark one.
Still crisp like last night, and there is little if any perception of alcohol.
Do we talk pH or TA?
How ~so~ we compare cider?
That metallic tinge I got last night seems absent this morning. Perhaps a reaction with something I'd eaten.
They both still have a 'finish' I'm not fond of however.

Again, thanks for stopping by.
Hoping I can learn something here today.

My coffee awaits consumption.

[edit]
A final comment.
Very poor form to have neither your
http://www.elevagewineco.com/
or
www.AttilaHardCider.com
web sites functional.



From my Pub's Research and Development lab stool, I have tried many ciders (many more than I ever told my wife), and have came across many styles some sweet, some dry and others in between. It seems that each region of the country is drinking slightly different styles. I think that has a lot to do with the varieties available to them.

As for how to drink and what to look for? I prefer mine super chilled in the freezer for a spell prior to drinking. Another thing I look for is clarity and oxidation. If the cider is murky or has an apple juice color it has either seen to much oxygen or loaded with cheap concentrates.

From my R & D most ciders don't hold a "head" like beer but remain carbonated for a day or so. If don't mind drink a slightly flat cider throw it back fridge for tomorrow. Since carbonation is a luxury and government taxes on bubbles we try and keep the carbonation under our Govt's "luxury" tax threshold.


Ph 3.7
TA .07 G per liter

raisedbywolves


quality posts: 34 Private Messages raisedbywolves
lec235 wrote:In terms of alcohol, where people who like white wine reach for white wine, I'll generally reach for cider. I prefer to drink it chilled, usually out of a pint glass, sometimes a goblet.

That being said, on the sweet-to-dry scale, where how would this compare to, say, the Crispin Honey Crisp? I choose that one because it's fairly widespread vs my current favorite local cider which I'd be *highly* surprised to find west of the Ohio River. I'm glad Woot is branching out, its just ciders (for me) are a lot more difficult to based on the general notes in the description than wine.



Finally a cider drinker! Crispin Honey is quite a bit sweeter than Attila. Attila is just off dry with around 1% RS

lec235


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lec235
raisedbywolves wrote:Finally a cider drinker! Crispin Honey is quite a bit sweeter than Attila. Attila is just off dry with around 1% RS



Thanks! That sounds properly interesting.

tekkitan


quality posts: 4 Private Messages tekkitan
cmaldoon wrote:Other than golden delicious, gala, and Granny Smith apples?



yes...

HypnoticSilence


quality posts: 1 Private Messages HypnoticSilence

Damn. I was interested in trying this, but then saw that my state isn't eligible =*(

Thought it was odd since I've bought wine before from woot, but I guess this doesn't count as wine.

raisedbywolves


quality posts: 34 Private Messages raisedbywolves

Hey wooters,

Thank you for your support over the years with Raised by Wolves wines. Keep in mind that we put the same passion and quality into Attila as we do our wines.

Cheers,

Bill Davis

SmilingBoognish


quality posts: 47 Private Messages SmilingBoognish

I don't drink a lot of cider, but do know that my favorite is the Pear cider made by Aces, in Sonoma County. It is quite dry and a refreshing beverage to enjoy at the beach or on a sunny afternoon.

Where does this 3G cider land in the spectrum of sweet to dry?

One additional question - would this be a good candidate for making a snakebite (equal parts lager or stout and hard cider)?

raisedbywolves


quality posts: 34 Private Messages raisedbywolves
SmilingBoognish wrote:I don't drink a lot of cider, but do know that my favorite is the Pear cider made by Aces, in Sonoma County. It is quite dry and a refreshing beverage to enjoy at the beach or on a sunny afternoon.

Where does this 3G cider land in the spectrum of sweet to dry?

One additional question - would this be a good candidate for making a snakebite (equal parts lager or stout and hard cider)?



1 being dry and 10 being sweet, I would rate this 1-2. As for snakebites never tried but it works well with an IPA or Fireball.

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
Jerry559 wrote:Your math is correct. I was into the whiskey last night and didn't do the math at all.



No problem. Whiskey will do that!! Which one?


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

chipgreen


quality posts: 185 Private Messages chipgreen
SmilingBoognish wrote:I don't drink a lot of cider, but do know that my favorite is the Pear cider made by Aces, in Sonoma County. It is quite dry and a refreshing beverage to enjoy at the beach or on a sunny afternoon.

Where does this 3G cider land in the spectrum of sweet to dry?

One additional question - would this be a good candidate for making a snakebite (equal parts lager or stout and hard cider)?


I thought a snakebite was made with Yukon Jack. Maybe they ran out of names for mixed drinks and are starting to recycle. (Or maybe I'm just old and nobody under 40 has heard of Yukon Jack!)

rooksie


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rooksie

I love whiskey, but I am also a fan of quality hard cider.

I will give this batch a try and share some with my other cider appreciating friends!

(My state has its draw backs, but bless them for letting me buy hard cider online!)

trifecta


quality posts: 72 Private Messages trifecta

Despite some of the wining about price, I am stoked to see an active discussion today. Its been a while.

I have a bottle of this at home, which I intended to drink today on my day off. Now I'm working. Grump. I'll be home later today and will pop it from the fridge into the freezer for a bit.

SWMBO is a fan of ciders, so she should have a good grasp on this one. I have bought many high end ciders to keep her appeased in the past. I think we have tried about 5 different variations of the cripsin, with the honeycrisp being our least favorite. IIRC there was one with belgian hops, a sake version, and a couple others I can't recall.

bskuared


quality posts: 11 Private Messages bskuared

So now we have no wine Thurs and no wine Friday. We may have to change the name soon!!

food. italy. food. italy. wine. books. travel. food. genealogy. food. wine. italy. food. get. the. idea?

San Clemente · http://www.italyandme.com

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
chipgreen wrote:I thought a snakebite was made with Yukon Jack. Maybe they ran out of names for mixed drinks and are starting to recycle. (Or maybe I'm just old and nobody under 40 has heard of Yukon Jack!)



They should still hear of it, it's still around.

And they have an Applejack version:




Snake Bite is officially made with Yukon Jack 100 proof.

However, one comment said: "Snake Bite in England consist of half a pint of beer/ale and half a pint of cider mixed together with a shot of blackcurrant juice for color"


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

trifecta


quality posts: 72 Private Messages trifecta
bskuared wrote:So now we have no wine Thurs and no wine Friday. We may have to change the name soon!!



-1. Whining at a fervent pitch today

SmilingBoognish


quality posts: 47 Private Messages SmilingBoognish
MarkDaSpark wrote:
However, one comment said: "Snake Bite in England consist of half a pint of beer/ale and half a pint of cider mixed together with a shot of blackcurrant juice for color"



When I was in England, you would get equal parts beer and cider in a pint glass when you ordered a snakebite. I only had a couple, as I much preferred the cask ale.

chipgreen


quality posts: 185 Private Messages chipgreen
MarkDaSpark wrote:They should still hear of it, it's still around.

And they have an Applejack version:




Snake Bite is officially made with Yukon Jack 100 proof.

However, one comment said: "Snake Bite in England consist of half a pint of beer/ale and half a pint of cider mixed together with a shot of blackcurrant juice for color"


I had a friend who was obsessed with Yukon Jack, he had all kinds of YJ swag and limited edition bottles. I used to tick him off by calling it "Northern Comfort".

jnfr


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jnfr

I was happy to see this offer as my husband loves hard ciders and this seems like a high quality one.

I know we think of cider in the fall because that's when apples ripen, but it makes a nice summer drink in place of beer, especially served cold.

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
SmilingBoognish wrote:When I was in England, you would get equal parts beer and cider in a pint glass when you ordered a snakebite. I only had a couple, as I much preferred the cask ale.



The comment I quoted also said they would only serve a couple half pints, and any more was too much for people to handle.


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

klezman


quality posts: 121 Private Messages klezman

I haven't had a dry cider in a while - molarchae prefers the sweeter ones. (Coming as no shock to those who know her, of course.) I'd be interested to try a bottle if somebody in SoCal is picking up an order.

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 181 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
klezman wrote:I haven't had a dry cider in a while - molarchae prefers the sweeter ones. (Coming as no shock to those who know her, of course.) I'd be interested to try a bottle if somebody in SoCal is picking up an order.



If I didn't have to be somewhere around 5, I would have driven up to share the monkey bottle. You aren't going to be around Long Beach then, are you?


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

InFrom


quality posts: 31 Private Messages InFrom
SmilingBoognish wrote:When I was in England, you would get equal parts beer and cider in a pint glass when you ordered a snakebite.

Imagine how much better it would have been with a shot of Ribena!

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus

Opened and poured side-by-side with an Angry Orchard Apple Cider. As I expected, I can't taste a thing. Sorry folks. The rest is stored for SWMBO to taste when she gets home (she likes the Angry Orchard). I'll report back with her notes.

For the record, the AO is way, way darker than this offer. I took a photo. Ill try to figure out a way to post it.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

raisedbywolves


quality posts: 34 Private Messages raisedbywolves
kylemittskus wrote:Opened and poured side-by-side with an Angry Orchard Apple Cider. As I expected, I can't taste a thing. Sorry folks. The rest is stored for SWMBO to taste when she gets home (she likes the Angry Orchard). I'll report back with her notes.

Thanks for the picture, nice comparison.

For the record, the AO is way, way darker than this offer. I took a photo. Ill try to figure out a way to post it.



jcbodley


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jcbodley

How long would you expect this Cider to last in storage?

siwbm


quality posts: 5 Private Messages siwbm

As of this moment, 42 have been sold.

raisedbywolves


quality posts: 34 Private Messages raisedbywolves
jcbodley wrote:How long would you expect this Cider to last in storage?



Keep it out of the sun and in a constant tempature it should be good to go for a couple of years.