sdilullo


quality posts: 36 Private Messages sdilullo
ddeuddeg wrote:After reading all of the comments, I feel like I should give this another chance after the weather warms up. If you decide to order, we can do a 2 or 3 way split, depending on whether anyone else jumps on board. Probably won't have it by then, though. We can figure something out.


Well that makes 3 of us for 2 bottles each.

You and Chip live in the same general direction, no? Seems like it might make more sense for one of you to order if that's the case so 2/3 of the wine finds its home sooner.

I have family in NE Ohio, so I'll be up that way eventually to collect.

my CT | bottles wooted to date: 249
my flying adventures | a mile of road will take you a mile, but a mile of runway will take you anywhere.

kaolis


quality posts: 27 Private Messages kaolis
rjquillin wrote:Soooooo much better participation than yesterday!



Still grumpy? ...just kidding

But yesterday made more sense after we found out the winery is out of biz.

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
Cyradia wrote:Very interesting offering! Nice to see winery participation early, too. Two questions:

1) The residual sugar stat is just listed as "dry." Any way we can get an actual number there or at least a ballpark range? After the recent NPR story on RS in dry wines, I'm gun shy.

2) The picture of the glass has a few large bubbles formed on the side of the glass. Was that just an unfortunate pour or is there a bit of effervescence in these bottles?



Bonjour Cyradia,
Thank you for your questions. You are actually bringing up a good point. My Colombard is dry as in 1.8g/l. There is no residual sugar.
No effervescence, the bubbles seen are more condensation drops.
Colombard used to be made sweet in the US in the 1970's because wineries didn't want to deal with the high acid and just wanted to blend the Colombard.
I am a purist. I want my Colombard dry because it's most refreshing and best suited for food.

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
bahwm wrote:A bottle of Y Rousseau 2012 Russian River Valley Old Vines Colombard found its way to our local FedEx/Kinko’s a few days ago. FWIW, when ddeuddeg and I taste wines, we keep our observations to ourselves until we have them pretty well formed and then, we discuss. Upon opening the bottle and pouring a taste portion, I got a pleasant nose full of honeysuckle and a bit of minerality. The color was light and very clear, picking up tones from the lighting. Very pretty. Upon tasting, I got a lot of citrus on the palate. It was also very tart, with a lot of green apple, grapefruit and lime and was highly acidic. There was not much of a finish to this wine.

I cannot remember when I last had a Colombard so I was really looking forward to trying this wine. I’m afraid that I was disappointed in it. It was too tart for my taste and it did not pair well with our meal: Panko and Parmesan Crusted Flounder, Whole Wheat Couscous with Sautéed Mixed Peppers and Toasted Pine Nuts and Broccoli with a squirt of lemon juice. As a stand alone, it didn’t work for me either. I was happy to give it a try, though.



Thank you for giving it a try. The crisp acidity can indeed "turn off" some peoples. My winemaking background and approach is to be respectful of what the vineyard gives me. Colombard has a natural bright acidity and I am not trying to hide it (by leaving sugar in it for example).
Again, thank you for trying it. If you happen to come to Napa Valley, please visit us and we will be happy to show you our entire portfolio. Cheers.

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
Cyradia wrote:Thanks for the review. I think the less flattering ones are tougher to write, but important for the community.

I was wondering if you could speak a little bit to the kind of light whites you normally like. For example, are sauvignon blancs usually too tart for you, too? I'm asking because we tend to like the tart whites in the summer, so I'm trying to gauge if this one is "over the top" tart and poorly done or just not your cup of tea.



Beside Gascony's Colombard, I believe my Russian River Colombard is very similar to Albariño grown in Spain. It is important to consider the overall whole experience of drinking the wine: balance between the aromatic comlexity, structure in the mouthfeel, acidity and finish.

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
Winedavid39 wrote:thanks for jumping on the boards! Interesting offer today to be sure.



Thank you for your participation. I want more and more people to discover Colombard. Colombard has been very much underestimated and underappreciated in the US. It is my mission!

neilfindswine


quality posts: 168 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

....good to see Y Rousseau on Woot! I've been twisting Yannick's arm for about a year and am glad he finally gave us a chance to try this wonderful SB/PG alternative....

Echoing Ali.... would LOVE to try the Tannat!

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

mommybob


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mommybob

I've never had a wine I thought was too dry. Oaky Chards gross me out.
So - this sounds perfect for me - in for six.
Deliver quickly, oh Woot gods - living in Florida, it's already pretty warm and perfect for dry wine.

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 26 Private Messages ddeuddeg
sdilullo wrote:Well that makes 3 of us for 2 bottles each.

You and Chip live in the same general direction, no? Seems like it might make more sense for one of you to order if that's the case so 2/3 of the wine finds its home sooner.

I have family in NE Ohio, so I'll be up that way eventually to collect.

Actually, Chip's more in the Cleveland area, and we're in Buffalo, so it's probably better going to one of you. I'll figure out an excuse to get out that way before summer's over, maybe take in an Indians game or something.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
neilfindswine wrote:....good to see Y Rousseau on Woot! I've been twisting Yannick's arm for about a year and am glad he finally gave us a chance to try this wonderful SB/PG alternative....

Echoing Ali.... would LOVE to try the Tannat!



Thank you Wooters for the opportunity to share my Colombard with you all!
As for the Tannat...the mission is even bigger: Putting Tannat on the map in the US.

Cyradia


quality posts: 29 Private Messages Cyradia

I'm in!

Thanks for the winemaker involvement and all the great tasting notes from other wooters. Absolutely responsible for this trigger pull.

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
mommybob wrote:I've never had a wine I thought was too dry. Oaky Chards gross me out.
So - this sounds perfect for me - in for six.
Deliver quickly, oh Woot gods - living in Florida, it's already pretty warm and perfect for dry wine.



Thank you mommy bob and welcome to the Colombard club! Florida weather is perfect for this wine (same thing for Texas).

rpm


quality posts: 167 Private Messages rpm

I haven't had this wine, but it looks interesting. Colombard was long the backbone of generic California white wine, providing the crispness and acidity which many of the other white grapes lacked. It does reasonably well in hot climates, and makes a very nice wine in the cooler coastal regions. Most of the generic whites made primarily from Colombard were slightly off-dry (at least by modern standards), but the grape is capable of making a very dry, crisp wine if grown in a cool climate and picked at the appropriate level of ripeness.

In an interesting side note, the wine UC Davis used to demonstrate the longevity of a crown cap seal on white wine was a 1934 Colombard, which was almost as fresh as when it was bottled when opened in '80s.

In France, as has been stated, Colombard is used for cognac and brandy. Large amounts of the Valley production of Colombard made California's better brandies (such as they were) through the 80s.

Colombard is also a prolific producer for those who want high yield in the bulk market - the name under which it was widely known in California back in the old days was West's White Prolific.

Given the reasonable price, the RRV appellation, this wine is certainly worth trying as long as you know it will be dry.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
rpm wrote:I haven't had this wine, but it looks interesting. Colombard was long the backbone of generic California white wine, providing the crispness and acidity which many of the other white grapes lacked. It does reasonably well in hot climates, and makes a very nice wine in the cooler coastal regions. Most of the generic whites made primarily from Colombard were slightly off-dry (at least by modern standards), but the grape is capable of making a very dry, crisp wine if grown in a cool climate and picked at the appropriate level of ripeness.

In an interesting side note, the wine UC Davis used to demonstrate the longevity of a crown cap seal on white wine was a 1934 Colombard, which was almost as fresh as when it was bottled when opened in '80s.

In France, as has been stated, Colombard is used for cognac and brandy. Large amounts of the Valley production of Colombard made California's better brandies (such as they were) through the 80s.

Given the reasonable price, the RRV appellation, this wine is certainly worth trying as long as you know it will be dry.



Thank you rpm for this additional information. Very interesting the part about the experiment screw cap by UC Davis.
Another thing I love about Colombard and that a lot of sommeliers and bar tenders love is that, even when the bottle has been open for 2-3-4 days the wine is still fruity and fresh. A great benefit when you don't want to drink the whole bottle in one night.
That attribute is directly linked to the low pH and good acidity.
Cheers

rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin

Ponfar rpm.

I have neither budget nor space for this.
Any SoCal up for a split?

Lost? You like whites..

CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
YROUSSEAU wrote:Another thing I love about Colombard and that a lot of sommeliers and bar tenders love is that, even when the bottle has been open for 2-3-4 days the wine is still fruity and fresh.

We have a pretty fair number of geeks here that use Ar to combat this very thing.

CT

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
rjquillin wrote:We have a pretty fair number of geeks here that use Ar to combat this very thing.



Argon is a good way to protect from oxidation.
But if the wine doesn't have the structure (backbone) and acidity, most often than not, it will loose its personality even if you use Argon....
Hope you'll be able to try my Colombard.

rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
YROUSSEAU wrote:Argon is a good way to protect from oxidation.
But if the wine doesn't have the structure (backbone) and acidity, most often than not, it will loose its personality even if you use Argon....
Hope you'll be able to try my Colombard.

Now, in ~this~ I would be interested in hearing more details...

How does the deterioration, short term, days~weeks~month, differ in an unopened bottle, stored at cellar temperature, as opposed to one fully flooded with 100% Argon, (not the mixed gas fixed dosage aerosols commonly sold) when stored at cellar or fridge temperatures?

Can you help out, or point the curious to some reading material?

CT

bahwm


quality posts: 26 Private Messages bahwm
Cyradia wrote:Thanks for the review. I think the less flattering ones are tougher to write, but important for the community.

I was wondering if you could speak a little bit to the kind of light whites you normally like. For example, are sauvignon blancs usually too tart for you, too? I'm asking because we tend to like the tart whites in the summer, so I'm trying to gauge if this one is "over the top" tart and poorly done or just not your cup of tea.


I typically like most whites: Chardonnay, SB, Viognier, Albariño, Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Roussanne and Ice wines, too! I just dislike sweet wines that the kiddies drink. SBs are fine for me, but tart apple in a beverage does not work for me--to crunch, it's fine!

May our love be like good wine, grow stronger as it grows older. ~ Old English Toast

CAGrl


quality posts: 13 Private Messages CAGrl
rjquillin wrote:Ponfar rpm.

I have neither budget nor space for this.
Any SoCal up for a split?

Lost? You like whites..


I'm in the same position but I'd be willing to take 3 bottles off your hands. Let me know.

tytiger58


quality posts: 74 Private Messages tytiger58
rjquillin wrote:Ponfar rpm.

I have neither budget nor space for this.
Any SoCal up for a split?

Lost? You like whites..



I am interested enough to give one a try but the rest of my white budget is going to LF later this month.

What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch? ~ W. C. Fields

“Freedom is something that dies unless it's used” Hunter S Thompson




YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
rjquillin wrote:Now, in ~this~ I would be interested in hearing more details...

How does the deterioration, short term, days~weeks~month, differ in an unopened bottle, stored at cellar temperature, as opposed to one fully flooded with 100% Argon, (not the mixed gas fixed dosage aerosols commonly sold) when stored at cellar or fridge temperatures?

Can you help out, or point the curious to some reading material?



I don't really have reading material. From experience and a little bit of chemical background, I can say that when a wine has a lower pH, it helps preserve the natural balance in the wine. If you have a high pH wine (and usually overripe) in an open bottle, the wine will evolve faster even if it is saturated with Argon. But it will also depend on the varietal, alcohol and tannic structure.
I don't believe it is an exact science.
Sorry I can't help more with that...but in any case, after 2 or 3 days, if the wine is good, the bottle should be empty! :-)

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
tytiger58 wrote:I am interested enough to give one a try but the rest of my white budget is going to LF later this month.



Thank you for trying my Colombard tytiger58. Enjoy!

kaolis


quality posts: 27 Private Messages kaolis

Not an Argon fan. Not a Vinturi fan. Not worried if my wine is not stored at 55 degrees and 70% humidity. Not worried about the the pH and TA of every friggin' wine I buy.

In for the Colombard.

rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
YROUSSEAU wrote:I don't really have reading material. From experience and a little bit of chemical background, I can say that when a wine has a lower pH, it helps preserve the natural balance in the wine. If you have a high pH wine (and usually overripe) in an open bottle, the wine will evolve faster even if it is saturated with Argon. But it will also depend on the varietal, alcohol and tannic structure.
I don't believe it is an exact science.
Sorry I can't help more with that...but in any case, after 2 or 3 days, if the wine is good, the bottle should be empty! :-)

Absolutely, with my minimal knowledge, agree on the pH, but Clark Smith does have some interesting views on higher pH wines as well. Some enlightening reading too on ripeness. We've had mixed results on trying to evaluate the Ar thing. I've noted changes in some over days, but not in others over weeks. The quest for understanding continues.

You have been a breath of fresh air today. On that alone, and with some help from tiger and CAGrl in the splitz, We're in for a woot.
Not sure how I'll get it up north, but perhaps cmaldoon can help if he makes a southern sometime.

Thanks, and hope to see that Tannat coming to a woot near us soon.

CT

CAGrl


quality posts: 13 Private Messages CAGrl
rjquillin wrote:On that alone, and with some help from tiger and CAGrl in the splitz, We're in for a woot.
Not sure how I'll get it up north, but perhaps cmaldoon can help if he makes a southern sometime.


I'm probably heading south to visit my sister in April (she's in Corona/Eastvale area), if that helps.

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
kaolis wrote:Not an Argon fan. Not a Vinturi fan. Not worried if my wine is not stored at 55 degrees and 70% humidity. Not worried about the the pH and TA of every friggin' wine I buy.

In for the Colombard.



Thank you for trying it. Love your post.
All for Wine, Wine for All!

kaolis


quality posts: 27 Private Messages kaolis

Irrelevant thread drift. Domaine du Tariquet Classic (France) which is a blend of Colombard and Ugni Blanc with a touch of SB I believe is a nice value, around $10. The Ugni Blanc gives the wine a little more fruit forward aspect. Been drinking this for years.

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
rjquillin wrote:Absolutely, with my minimal knowledge, agree on the pH, but Clark Smith does have some interesting views on higher pH wines as well. Some enlightening reading too on ripeness. We've had mixed results on trying to evaluate the Ar thing. I've noted changes in some over days, but not in others over weeks. The quest for understanding continues.

You have been a breath of fresh air today. On that alone, and with some help from tiger and CAGrl in the splitz, We're in for a woot.
Not sure how I'll get it up north, but perhaps cmaldoon can help if he makes a southern sometime.

Thanks, and hope to see that Tannat coming to a woot near us soon.



It has been my pleasure.
Clark Smith is a very talented winemaker and wine gourou...and a very funny guy too.
The Tannat will come soon...but when???

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
kaolis wrote:Irrelevant thread drift. Domaine du Tariquet Classic (France) which is a blend of Colombard and Ugni Blanc with a touch of SB I believe is a nice value, around $10. The Ugni Blanc gives the wine a little more fruit forward aspect. Been drinking this for years.



Tariquet is very near my home town! It is the quintessential white wine from Gascony. Actually, in that region, there are more and more young winemakers making pure Colombard wines that are very good value. Domaine de Mirail is one of them.

mproulx49


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mproulx49

I have been trying cut back on my wine buying, but have never had a Colombard before. Thanks to the great winery participation and comments, you have pulled me back in.
In for one!
Sounds like a great wine for the upcoming Arizona summer. :-)

kaolis


quality posts: 27 Private Messages kaolis
YROUSSEAU wrote:Tariquet is very near my home town! It is the quintessential white wine from Gascony. Actually, in that region, there are more and more young winemakers making pure Colombard wines that are very good value. Domaine de Mirail is one of them.



Available US? I'll give them a try if so.

Thinking I need a tad of Armagnac now......

chipgreen


quality posts: 179 Private Messages chipgreen
ddeuddeg wrote:After reading all of the comments, I feel like I should give this another chance after the weather warms up. If you decide to order, we can do a 2 or 3 way split, depending on whether anyone else jumps on board. Probably won't have it by then, though. We can figure something out.


Ugh, I didn't think about the fact that it won't get here within 11 days. I'll go ahead and buy anyway, no obligation necessary from you or Steve but would be happy to split the order if we can arrange it. Would love to hookup for an Indians game or something else over the summer!

Last wooter to woot:chipgreen

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
kaolis wrote:Available US? I'll give them a try if so.

Thinking I need a tad of Armagnac now......



It is available in some states but not a lot. where are you?

I knew you were gonna talk about Armagnac soon! I am a huge fan of Armagnac. My ultimate secret project (for my retirement) will be to find old stock of Armagnac in Gascony and do my own blending...

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
mproulx49 wrote:I have been trying cut back on my wine buying, but have never had a Colombard before. Thanks to the great winery participation and comments, you have pulled me back in.
In for one!
Sounds like a great wine for the upcoming Arizona summer. :-)



Thank you mproulx49 for trying it. It will be perfect for your very hot AZ summer.

tytiger58


quality posts: 74 Private Messages tytiger58
kaolis wrote:

Thinking I need a tad of Armagnac now......


Dang it you just reminded me I need to pick some of that up soon

What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch? ~ W. C. Fields

“Freedom is something that dies unless it's used” Hunter S Thompson




rjquillin


quality posts: 170 Private Messages rjquillin
tytiger58 wrote:Dang it you just reminded me I need to pick some of that up soon

Still coveting my 1979 Armagnac Castarède Bas Armagnac.
but blending...
Only in another lifetime.

CT

bahwm


quality posts: 26 Private Messages bahwm
YROUSSEAU wrote:Thank you for giving it a try. The crisp acidity can indeed "turn off" some peoples. My winemaking background and approach is to be respectful of what the vineyard gives me. Colombard has a natural bright acidity and I am not trying to hide it (by leaving sugar in it for example).
Again, thank you for trying it. If you happen to come to Napa Valley, please visit us and we will be happy to show you our entire portfolio. Cheers.


Thank you so much for your great participation on wine.woot today. I really like that you are respectful of what the vineyard gives you. We will be happy to stop by and visit. Ddeuddeg & I are planning to come out to Cali in July. It'll be nice to taste this wine on a hot day and not on a zero degree day in March! We will be splitting an order with some of our woot friends in Ohio.

May our love be like good wine, grow stronger as it grows older. ~ Old English Toast

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
bahwm wrote:Thank you so much for your great participation on wine.woot today. I really like that you are respectful of what the vineyard gives you. We will be happy to stop by and visit. Ddeuddeg & I are planning to come out to Cali in July. It'll be nice to taste this wine on a hot day and not on a zero degree day in March! We will be splitting an order with some of our woot friends in Ohio.



Merci for trying the Colombard! It is a great opportunity for me share my winemaking philosophy and my wine. When you come in July, you can contact me directly on my email: yannick@yrousseauwines.com
Cheers

YROUSSEAU


quality posts: 11 Private Messages YROUSSEAU
rjquillin wrote:Still coveting my 1979 Armagnac Castarède Bas Armagnac.
but blending...
Only in another lifetime.



1979 was an excellent vintage for Armagnac.