+ Add a Comment

bahwm


quality posts: 57 Private Messages bahwm

There has been quite a bit of discussion lately about sous vide cooking in the CyberPub. We're going to start to cross-post that information here. Feel free to share your experiences and your recipes. Enjoy!

May our love be like good wine, grow stronger as it grows older. ~ Old English Toast

rjquillin


quality posts: 286 Private Messages rjquillin

Good call, thanks for the thread.

CT

polarbear22


quality posts: 41 Private Messages polarbear22

What is a good meal for first use? My wife let her mother get afraid of it. Something about not being able to use it on their type of countertop (use a trivet) and not using an extension cord. Been pretty busy since Christmas, so no chance to use it yet. But here I thought they would be excited, and they seem to want to shove it deep in a drawer and never use it.

bahwm


quality posts: 57 Private Messages bahwm
polarbear22 wrote:What is a good meal for first use? My wife let her mother get afraid of it. Something about not being able to use it on their type of countertop (use a trivet) and not using an extension cord. Been pretty busy since Christmas, so no chance to use it yet. But here I thought they would be excited, and they seem to want to shove it deep in a drawer and never use it.

We put the pot on top of a wooden cutting board. No prob. For our first recipe, we did the super thick Hard Cider Recipe that came in the welcome email. We didn't use hard cider though--we could now! I think there was some garlic, too. The porkers came out really good--evenly cooked and tender. Quite delicious. We would do them again.

May our love be like good wine, grow stronger as it grows older. ~ Old English Toast

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
polarbear22 wrote:What is a good meal for first use? My wife let her mother get afraid of it. Something about not being able to use it on their type of countertop (use a trivet) and not using an extension cord. Been pretty busy since Christmas, so no chance to use it yet. But here I thought they would be excited, and they seem to want to shove it deep in a drawer and never use it.



It's not like a smoker where there's a curve. On Christmas I did strips, fillets, and sirloin in the same pot. All came out perfect rare or medium rare depending on taste. Being me, and insane, I have two just for that reason. If you really want justification for buying it, go with steaks or prime rib. Once you cook restaurant quality steaks at home the price is a no brainer, especially when your wine list is better than most steak houses ;)

As far as recipe, whatever seasoning you like, steaks no longer than six hours, no less than um 1.5 probably. Prime rib I did six hours was awesome, 8-10 probably better. Check the Anova website for times.

Also, medium rare pork chops are a revelation, as well as the single juiciest chicken breast you will ever eat.

For Browning, cause steaks are gray and unappealing out of the bag I have a large lodge two burner style griddle I pop under the broiler for fifteen minutes and broil them four minutes. They cook both sides that way.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

rjquillin


quality posts: 286 Private Messages rjquillin

First thing we cooked were some smaller, 6~8 oz, New Your cap stakes in a
faux dry aged marinade.
Cooked them 1+hr to 52C then ~30 sec/side on a propane grill for color.
SIL raved about them so BIL purchased one, which blew up my Christmas gift idea for them

CT

rjquillin


quality posts: 286 Private Messages rjquillin
bhodilee wrote:Also, medium rare pork chops are a revelation, as well as the single juiciest chicken breast you will ever eat.

Need to know more about this chicken process...

CT

sosptuba


quality posts: 13 Private Messages sosptuba

Finally got off the pot after 6 months of thinking about it and ordered mine. Arrives on Wednesday. Our NYE supper fourth course was actually a beef tenderloin cooked Sous Vide

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
rjquillin wrote:Need to know more about this chicken process...



150-155f for an hour or so. That's it, whatever it takes to pasteurize. Boneless skinless chicken breast or skin on. If you skin on just fry it skin side down before you eat it.

Kenji has a good article.

http://recipes.anovaculinary.com/recipe/chicken-breast
I buy split chicken breasts on sale then take em off the bone. Make a little cut on the rib and then slide your thumb in, it'll peel right off the bone and give you breast and tenderloin pieces. Then you have skin on boneless breasts, use the bones to make lots of stock using your instant pot, which is another awesome kitchen appliance which can, and will, replace your crock pot.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee

Also, Chef Steps is releasing a precision cooker for $199 early price with an 1100w element that is small enough to fit in a drawer and is at minimum blue tooth. So there I'll be competition in the market soon.

https://www.chefsteps.com/joule

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

Question in case anyone has experience with this. Can you put something in the water frozen (knowing that it would take longer to cook), or should you fully thaw first?

We have a foodsaver, so I am just wondering if I can prep things fully way ahead of time (meat plus spices/marinade) and freeze them, then pull them right out of the freezer into the water to cook.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

rjquillin


quality posts: 286 Private Messages rjquillin
North316 wrote:Question in case anyone has experience with this. Can you put something in the water frozen (knowing that it would take longer to cook), or should you fully thaw first?

We have a foodsaver, so I am just wondering if I can prep things fully way ahead of time (meat plus spices/marinade) and freeze them, then pull them right out of the freezer into the water to cook.

Those last Flannerys I did were directly from freezer to pot. One was ~0.75" thick and the other nearly 2.0". Same cook time for both, a bit over two hours to 50C, and same rare results for both. Klez suggests a bit higher temp, but I think he likes burnt meat.
I'll find a less expensive cut to experiment on next time.

CT

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman
polarbear22 wrote:What is a good meal for first use? My wife let her mother get afraid of it. Something about not being able to use it on their type of countertop (use a trivet) and not using an extension cord. Been pretty busy since Christmas, so no chance to use it yet. But here I thought they would be excited, and they seem to want to shove it deep in a drawer and never use it.



Steak. Or tritip.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman
North316 wrote:Question in case anyone has experience with this. Can you put something in the water frozen (knowing that it would take longer to cook), or should you fully thaw first?

We have a foodsaver, so I am just wondering if I can prep things fully way ahead of time (meat plus spices/marinade) and freeze them, then pull them right out of the freezer into the water to cook.



Yes, that is now our standard procedure. Buy, season, vacuum seal, freeze. Right into pot whenever needed.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman
rjquillin wrote:Those last Flannerys I did were directly from freezer to pot. One was ~0.75" thick and the other nearly 2.0". Same cook time for both, a bit over two hours to 50C, and same rare results for both. Klez suggests a bit higher temp, but I think he likes burnt meat.
I'll find a less expensive cut to experiment on next time.



Beef fat renders at 55 C. That is the temp to go at since you get a beefier flavour.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

jawlz


quality posts: 13 Private Messages jawlz

Easiest cooking there is. My wife and I have a Sous Vide Supreme, not an Anova, but the principle of bringing food to the temperature of the water bath should be the same.

I started out basically using it as a poor-man's smoker (i.e. doing the low-and-slow cooking without the smoke, since we were in an apartment at the time) and doing ~8-10 hours for things like brisket and tri-tip. It worked great. Steaks, vegetables, pork chops, whatever - it's all pretty easy to do. Just give your cooked food a quick sear (on the grill, in a pan, or with a blow-torch) when you take them out, and you're good to go.

One thing to remember, I suppose, is that a little seasoning goes a longer way when you're cooking sous-vide than in other types of cooking.

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

Anyone ever cook a corned beef brisket in one? Bought one this weekend not even thinking of this application, but now that I think about it, it could be wonderful. The only draw back would be that my wife likes to do the traditional cabbage, potatoes and carrots with corned beef, and that would likely not be feasible in the sous vide.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:Anyone ever cook a corned beef brisket in one? Bought one this weekend not even thinking of this application, but now that I think about it, it could be wonderful. The only draw back would be that my wife likes to do the traditional cabbage, potatoes and carrots with corned beef, and that would likely not be feasible in the sous vide.



They claim veggies are better than at for sous vide. Honestly never done any.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

wkdpanda


quality posts: 14 Private Messages wkdpanda

Weighing in on the temp discussion between Klez and RJ, I would lean toward Klez on this one.

55C is right at the rare level, and a hit on a grill to sear the outside should take it to a perfect slightly under medium rare.

50C - Well, that's in the blue area for me.

----------------
Andy the Wicked Panda

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
bhodilee wrote:They claim veggies are better than at for sous vide. Honestly never done any.



My problem is that making a bag big enough to have the corned beef and all of the veggies in the same bag is just not really feasible. We discussed and came to a compromise though. Cut the corned beef brisket in half, cook half in the sous vide and the other half in the traditional method (which for me is roasting/braising, not boiling) with vegetables. This will also allow for a direct comparison of the meats.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:My problem is that making a bag big enough to have the corned beef and all of the veggies in the same bag is just not really feasible. We discussed and came to a compromise though. Cut the corned beef brisket in half, cook half in the sous vide and the other half in the traditional method (which for me is roasting/braising, not boiling) with vegetables. This will also allow for a direct comparison of the meats.



I'd have done them in separate bags. Your way is equitable though. Let us known the results.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
bhodilee wrote:I'd have done them in separate bags. Your way is equitable though. Let us known the results.



The whole reason she likes the veggies is because they take on some of the corned beef flavor, so it would have to be together.

Now to find the right cooking times, I am seeing large variants.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:The whole reason she likes the veggies is because they take on some of the corned beef flavor, so it would have to be together.

Now to find the right cooking times, I am seeing large variants.



Ah, yeah you wouldn't want to do that, the veggies would taste entirely of the corned beef, and be too soft. I suppose you could throw them in later, but that's a hassle. I did a 48 hour roast and put Worstechchkdahlfdka;reshire sauce in it and the whole thing tasted of sauce, so I shan't be doing that again soon.

I'd follow Klez's suggestion for regular brisket.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

sosptuba


quality posts: 13 Private Messages sosptuba

Going to give mine an inaugural run this evening. Probably some sort of steak but suggestions are always welcome =)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
bhodilee wrote:Ah, yeah you wouldn't want to do that, the veggies would taste entirely of the corned beef, and be too soft. I suppose you could throw them in later, but that's a hassle. I did a 48 hour roast and put Worstechchkdahlfdka;reshire sauce in it and the whole thing tasted of sauce, so I shan't be doing that again soon.

I'd follow Klez's suggestion for regular brisket.



I'd have to dig Klez's suggestion up, since it's not in this thread!

Also, interesting on Worchestire sauce. I always put it in any beef marinade, so I will definitely go easy on it when using the sous vide.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:I'd have to dig Klez's suggestion up, since it's not in this thread!

Also, interesting on Worchestire sauce. I always put it in any beef marinade, so I will definitely go easy on it when using the sous vide.



klezman wrote:Brisket. 2-3 days at 61 C. Season as you like it (we do an onion soup base). Either sear it in a super hot over or blowtorch it after it comes out. You've never had anything like it.
"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee

Has anyone played with smoking then Sous Vide? I am terrified of smoking brisket, cause it's fairly expensive, I thought I could smoke it for four hours (after that you're not getting more smoke in the meat), then bagging and circulating til perfect tender. Not sure how it would work. Conversely, I could sous vide then cold smoke. What do you think?

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
bhodilee wrote:Has anyone played with smoking then Sous Vide? I am terrified of smoking brisket, cause it's fairly expensive, I thought I could smoke it for four hours (after that you're not getting more smoke in the meat), then bagging and circulating til perfect tender. Not sure how it would work. Conversely, I could sous vide then cold smoke. What do you think?



Only one way to find out, right? (maybe try it with a different cut first). I don't see why it wouldn't work, though there may be some scientific reasons why it would be a bad idea?

My only thought is that you would want/nee to bring it back down or near room temp before bagging it for the sous vide.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

klezman


quality posts: 174 Private Messages klezman
bhodilee wrote:Has anyone played with smoking then Sous Vide? I am terrified of smoking brisket, cause it's fairly expensive, I thought I could smoke it for four hours (after that you're not getting more smoke in the meat), then bagging and circulating til perfect tender. Not sure how it would work. Conversely, I could sous vide then cold smoke. What do you think?



I'm going to try sous vide with liquid smoke one of these days.

I stopped counting bottles. My CT

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:Only one way to find out, right? (maybe try it with a different cut first). I don't see why it wouldn't work, though there may be some scientific reasons why it would be a bad idea?

My only thought is that you would want/nee to bring it back down or near room temp before bagging it for the sous vide.



Yeah, I need to buy a vacuum sealer. I've noticed the zip loc bags don't like to be in more than 48 hours, they tend to leach out, but not in, it's weird.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

sosptuba


quality posts: 13 Private Messages sosptuba
bhodilee wrote:Has anyone played with smoking then Sous Vide? I am terrified of smoking brisket, cause it's fairly expensive, I thought I could smoke it for four hours (after that you're not getting more smoke in the meat), then bagging and circulating til perfect tender. Not sure how it would work. Conversely, I could sous vide then cold smoke. What do you think?



I was just watching a show on PBS create the other night about BBQ and they were talking about a place that cold smokes brisket for 24 hours, sous vide for 48 hours, and then finishes over wood fire for another 24 hours.

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
sosptuba wrote:I was just watching a show on PBS create the other night about BBQ and they were talking about a place that cold smokes brisket for 24 hours, sous vide for 48 hours, and then finishes over wood fire for another 24 hours.



that's a lot of work

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
bhodilee wrote:Yeah, I need to buy a vacuum sealer. I've noticed the zip loc bags don't like to be in more than 48 hours, they tend to leach out, but not in, it's weird.



You can spend $400-$500 on a blender, but not $150 or less on vacuum sealer? Priorities man.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

sosptuba


quality posts: 13 Private Messages sosptuba
bhodilee wrote:that's a lot of work



agree - I was thinking maybe 3 hours on my traeger to smoke and then sous vide for ?????

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316

I'm guessing I don't want to let the bag sit on the bottom of the pan? Most of what I am readying suggests clipping it to the side of the pan, but how is sitting on the side of the plan any better than the bottom?

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:I'm guessing I don't want to let the bag sit on the bottom of the pan? Most of what I am readying suggests clipping it to the side of the pan, but how is sitting on the side of the plan any better than the bottom?



So it doesn't float over and block the port. They'll do that, plus if it's not in the bottom you get better coverage or something.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 34 Private Messages bhodilee
North316 wrote:You can spend $400-$500 on a blender, but not $150 or less on vacuum sealer? Priorities man.



I never claimed to make sense. Plus the Ziploc and water displacement method work for most everything.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
bhodilee wrote:I never claimed to make sense. Plus the Ziploc and water displacement method work for most everything.



You will save money with the foodsaver, especially if you are using gallon size ziplocs.

My maiden voyage will be complete tonight. I will try and take pictures of the comparison between the two corned beefs.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

rjquillin


quality posts: 286 Private Messages rjquillin
North316 wrote:You will save money with the foodsaver, especially if you are using gallon size ziplocs.

My maiden voyage will be complete tonight. I will try and take pictures of the comparison between the two corned beefs.

At some point, there is just no more room for kitchen electrics.

Looking forward to those comparison results and pics.

CT

North316


quality posts: 108 Private Messages North316
rjquillin wrote:At some point, there is just no modre room for kitchen electrics.

Looking forward to those comparison results and pics.



Our foodsaver is in our second bedroom aka storage aka pantry aka wine cellar.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013