michaelvella


quality posts: 12 Private Messages michaelvella
slicey wrote:Dang, no Kansas again.

I can walk to Missouri from here, but I hesitate to have this shipped to any of my friends in MO since no one will be home during the day to receive it.



They don't need to be. You can have FedEx hold the box at one of their locations. I do that every time.
Oh, and in for one.

jstrateg


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jstrateg

Can anyone compare this with Craggy Range, which is my current favorite SB?

losthighwayz


quality posts: 58 Private Messages losthighwayz
longmeadowranch wrote:The wine is fresh and youthful. Crisp up front with a round finish. Ideally, drink now through 2013.



Thanks! In for one. Looking forward to enjoying it.

"The older I get the better I was"

losthighwayz


quality posts: 58 Private Messages losthighwayz

WW came back strong after the WTSO discussion last week. These last two days have been killer deals IMO. 18 bottles of quality merlot, cab, and sauv for about 9.50 each delivered is unbeatable!

I recently ordered a case of zin/sauv from Wilson in Dry Creek Valley and though I got a great deal the shipping was a whopping $29! Gotta appreciate Woot on their shipping.

"The older I get the better I was"

ktbird2


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ktbird2

This sounds like just the kind of SB I love. In for one.
And I love their website!!!

bolligra


quality posts: 33 Private Messages bolligra
elizabethchase wrote:"If you're drunk when the package shows up, you will not be allowed to receive it"

Really?



Yea...

FedEx Guy: "I'm sorry sir, but you've had a little too much to drink today. I'm going to have to lug this box back to the truck, take it back to the processing center, fill out a piece of paper and give it back to the distribution clerk, and then lug it back out tomorrow and hope you're not drunk again."

NOT!


As God is my witness, I thought turkeys could fly.

losthighwayz


quality posts: 58 Private Messages losthighwayz
richardhod wrote:That's a great recommendation. PLease do ask him to come here and faux rat! Talking of which... when do we get rattage back?

Stats look good: reasonable alcohol levels, nice high acidity and decent TA. But Rutherford's a Cabernet area: a lot warmer than I'd expect for Sauvignon Blanc which thrives in New Zealand for tart gooseberry flavours, and the Loire, or in blend, Bordeaux. I suspect given the warmer climate this may be a bit like South African Sauvignons Blancs, the best of which show complex grapefruit, gooseberry, grass, lime, yellow and tropical fruits, but with less intensity and concentration than the colder-weather SBs.

Of course this is merely a supposition and having said this, it may bve entirely different, and we may be surprised by the micro-climate, winemaking techniques and other oddities of winemaking



I enjoy Sonoma and Napa warmer climate SBs b/c they tend to have a tropical fruit nose, not much grassiness, and are crisp and mineral. I am not a big fan of NZ and other grassy SBs though. So what do you mean by intensity and concentration?

"The older I get the better I was"

syphen9


quality posts: 3 Private Messages syphen9

This is fantastic wine! I keep a small stockpile at my house at all times! The 2009 has crisp acid, a great mouthfeel, and pairs well with seafood, cheese, and (of course) a second bottle. This wine is very refreshing on a hot day. There are few SBs that can compare. Great job WOOT! on presenting this offering.

phaytal


quality posts: 0 Private Messages phaytal

This is a fantastic Sauv Blanc, and just one of LMR's very, very good wines.

In for 2.

Tunes4u


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Tunes4u

No Wyoming.....geez....that is Dot's Poetry Corner. Wyoming is probably the easiest state out there. Wyoming is always on the list.

There are more people in the City of Denver than there are in the State of Wyoming. So me and the other guy who buys wine here in Wyoming just don't get to ship it to some different location. We might as well come pick it up.....

Just as well though....I am broke, although that has never stopped me before.

It is well to remember that there are five reasons for drinking wine: the arrival of a friend; one's present or future thirst; the excellence of the wine; or any other reason.

guardjc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages guardjc

I am also surprised at no Georgia. I remember liking the Sauvignon Blanc last time I visited the LMR tasting room. I enjoyed the swing and horseshoe pit they have outside too. Not a bad tasting room to stop by next time any of you are in the area.

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
losthighwayz wrote:I enjoy Sonoma and Napa warmer climate SBs b/c they tend to have a tropical fruit nose, not much grassiness, and are crisp and mineral. I am not a big fan of NZ and other grassy SBs though. So what do you mean by intensity and concentration?



This will be less grassy, indeed, more grapefruit, but just lighter and less, hmm maybe less malic than the cold-weather NZ ones which are ofren so intensely gooseberry- and sometimes grassy that they really are strong-flavoured, as if there's no water and it's all flavour. That can be overwhelming for some people. The good South African SBs I've tasted (ad therfore this too according to Scott) are more accessible to a casual drinker, still dry, but not as tart and mouth-puckering, but instead what I'd call fresh and open, rather than strong and intense, but still crisp, and complex.

SBs are all dry AFAIK, to the person who asked that too, except as blended in Sauternes.

bsevern


quality posts: 109 Private Messages bsevern
longmeadowranch wrote:Our LMR Sauvignon Blanc has an excellent balance of style. Its citrus notes are from grapefruit to Meyer lemon with added layers of complexity from a short Sur Lie aging in tank. Yes, Rutherford is a great Cabernet growing AVA, but our San Mateo Vineyard happens to be in a very deep gravel bed and the minerality of the site shows through. Produced from Organically Grown grapes (CCOF). Stelvin screw cap. Clean. Crisp. Fresh. Enjoy.

- Chris, Long Meadow Ranch



Thanks for joining in. I'm not a big fan of grapefruit bomb Sauvignon Blancs. Is this the main flavor attribute of this one? I love some of the Sauvignon Blancs coming from Lake County, no grapefruit, no grass, but nice tropical and pear flavors, lemon pie, good balance of acid, and good minerality.

losthighwayz


quality posts: 58 Private Messages losthighwayz
bsevern wrote:Thanks for joining in. I'm not a big fan of grapefruit bomb Sauvignon Blancs. Is this the main flavor attribute of this one? I love some of the Sauvignon Blancs coming from Lake County, no grapefruit, no grass, but nice tropical and pear flavors, lemon pie, good balance of acid, and good minerality.



Did you have a chance to try the Twenty Rows SB that was offered here this past August? I am trying to get a feel for the graefruit notes you are referring to. Thanks

"The older I get the better I was"

longmeadowranch


quality posts: 7 Private Messages longmeadowranch

We wish we could ship to you in GA as well. However, due to GA state regulations we cannot ship to you unless you are on-site, making the purchase yourself at the winery/tasting room. Free The Grapes!
http://www.freethegrapes.org/

guardjc wrote:I am also surprised at no Georgia. I remember liking the Sauvignon Blanc last time I visited the LMR tasting room. I enjoyed the swing and horseshoe pit they have outside too. Not a bad tasting room to stop by next time any of you are in the area.



longmeadowranch


quality posts: 7 Private Messages longmeadowranch

The wine has an excellent balance of style. Yes, light tropical fruit, mild citrus, apple, not grassy.

bsevern wrote:Thanks for joining in. I'm not a big fan of grapefruit bomb Sauvignon Blancs. Is this the main flavor attribute of this one? I love some of the Sauvignon Blancs coming from Lake County, no grapefruit, no grass, but nice tropical and pear flavors, lemon pie, good balance of acid, and good minerality.



longmeadowranch


quality posts: 7 Private Messages longmeadowranch

This SB is 100% stainless steel cold fermented. No ML. Dry. There is a depth of complexity beyond the freshness from a short, in tank Sur Lie aging. Basically, crisp up front but finishing round (not ML round).

richardhod wrote:This will be less grassy, indeed, more grapefruit, but just lighter and less, hmm maybe less malic than the cold-weather NZ ones which are ofren so intensely gooseberry- and sometimes grassy that they really are strong-flavoured, as if there's no water and it's all flavour. That can be overwhelming for some people. The good South African SBs I've tasted (ad therfore this too according to Scott) are more accessible to a casual drinker, still dry, but not as tart and mouth-puckering, but instead what I'd call fresh and open, rather than strong and intense, but still crisp, and complex.

SBs are all dry AFAIK, to the person who asked that too, except as blended in Sauternes.



winedrew


quality posts: 6 Private Messages winedrew
richardhod wrote:That's a great recommendation. PLease do ask him to come here and faux rat! Talking of which... when do we get rattage back?

Stats look good: reasonable alcohol levels, nice high acidity and decent TA. But Rutherford's a Cabernet area: a lot warmer than I'd expect for Sauvignon Blanc which thrives in New Zealand for tart gooseberry flavours, and the Loire, or in blend, Bordeaux. I suspect given the warmer climate this may be a bit like South African Sauvignons Blancs, the best of which show complex grapefruit, gooseberry, grass, lime, yellow and tropical fruits, but with less intensity and concentration than the colder-weather SBs.

Of course this is merely a supposition and having said this, it may bve entirely different, and we may be surprised by the micro-climate, winemaking techniques and other oddities of winemaking



Love this SB!

Winedrew

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
richardhod wrote:

SBs are all dry AFAIK, to the person who asked that too, except as blended in Sauternes.



It was me that asked. Thanks for the answer, though I assumed as much. I have found I am just not too fond of SB, but still trying to find out if it is a certain style or just the varietal as a whole. I'm still learning the flavor profiles and nuances of many different types of wine, but I tend to not be a huge fan of dry, minerally whites (most of the SB's a Gerwurzt's I have had). I still have yet to pop open the KR SB I have, so maybe that will be the one which changes my mind.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

mattneumeyer


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mattneumeyer
longmeadowranch wrote:We wish we could ship to you in GA as well. However, due to GA state regulations we cannot ship to you unless you are on-site, making the purchase yourself at the winery/tasting room. Free The Grapes!
http://www.freethegrapes.org/




What GA state regulations keep you from shipping to us? I (and many others here) buy online all the time.

chipandstephanie


quality posts: 0 Private Messages chipandstephanie
longmeadowranch wrote:We wish we could ship to you in GA as well. However, due to GA state regulations we cannot ship to you unless you are on-site, making the purchase yourself at the winery/tasting room. Free The Grapes!
http://www.freethegrapes.org/




I am not sure your interpretation of the GA law is correct (but I am perfectly willing to admit that I may be the one who is wrong). If you can only ship to customers who make the purchase themselves onsite, then that should preclude Georgia from ALL wine.woot offerings. Thankfully, that is not the case.

If I am correct, the lack of availability to Georgia on this deal is due to the fact that the winery itself did not purchase a permit to ship to Georgia. That would be the winery's fault, not the State of Georgia.

So then (and still assuming that I am correct), is this a case wherein the winery was simply not aware that they could obtain a permit to ship to Georgia, or did the winery purposefully decide NOT to obtain the permit?

If the former, we wish you a warm welcome from your soon-to-be customers in the Peach State. If the latter, you may chastise us for not buying enough of your wine to make the permit profitable.

[Edited to correct punctuation.]

strongry


quality posts: 2 Private Messages strongry

This looked really interesting, and great to have on hand for the summer. So, I was drawn to ordering, but I have a concussion, so I was a bit hesitant to order booze given my mentally addled state. But, my brother visited Long Meadow Ranch last year and raved about it. Just talked to him and he said it was a steal, and what with him not having a concussion, in for one! I bet that post made total sense.

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
North316 wrote:It was me that asked. Thanks for the answer, though I assumed as much. I have found I am just not too fond of SB, but still trying to find out if it is a certain style or just the varietal as a whole. I'm still learning the flavor profiles and nuances of many different types of wine, but I tend to not be a huge fan of dry, minerally whites (most of the SB's a Gerwurzt's I have had). I still have yet to pop open the KR SB I have, so maybe that will be the one which changes my mind.



If you're not sure about SB, this is almost certainly the most approachable kind of SB style you'll find, and probably my favourite kind of summer wine (great Rieslings are for all-year round;). The NZ cooler weather ones are rather more extreme, and the Rasmussen SB is much more like a NZ SB, with more intense gooseberry and grass than this, and less rounded perhaps, concentrating on thoe flavours intensely. Also not a grapefruit bomb, but it is a singular experience.
This style is worth trying as a contrast, being lighter and more relaxed in its approach, and have more of the tropical and other flavours mentioned by people above. The Wellington SB which I liked even better than the Rasmussen is probably in between the two.

Incidentally, the South African SBs I have drunk mainly in South Africa, and I don't know whether they export any here (of any quality).

PTommins


quality posts: 7 Private Messages PTommins
richardhod wrote:If you're not sure about SB, this is almost certainly the most approachable kind of SB style you'll find, and probably my favourite kind of summer wine. The NZ cooler weather ones are rather more extreme, and the Rasmussen SB is much more like a NZ SB, with more intense gooseberry and grass than this, and less rounded, perhaps though also not a grapefruit bomb. This is worth trying as a contrast. The Wellington SB which I liked even better than the Rasmussen is probably in between the two.

Incidentally, the South African SBs I have drunk mainly in South Africa, and I don't know whether they export any here (of any quality).



Thanks for the great info. How will this compare with the 09 Silverado SB? I thoroughly enjoyed that one !

liverman


quality posts: 16 Private Messages liverman
ScottHarveyWines wrote:
Richard, You called it right. The wine is more like a South African SB. It has complex grapefruit and lime. Little lighter on the grass. It is one of Jana and my favorites. We love enjoying a chilled bottle while we are cooking dinner and on into the first course. This is a better price than we get with inter winery discount. I'm in for two.



ScottHarveyWines wrote:Long Meadow Ranch tasting room is right next to Farmstead restaurant in St. Helena. Jana and I like to go to the tasting room and pick up a bottle of this SB and then walk over and have lunch at Farmstead. The restaurant is great and the cookage deal is as well. This wine goes great with Farmstead's "Potted Pig"



I see, Scott, that you chimed in with tasting notes and buying and food pairing advice . Wonder how they get that pig in a pot

I have never traveled to South Africa on the "sauvignon blanc express" - just New Zealand, Chile, Washington state and ...

I just had your very nice 2010 Jana SB that I purchased in January. Very clean, crisp, subtle citrus with a touch of mineral. How would you compare your Jana (Sauvignon Blanc) with the LMR in nose and palate profiles?

Thanks!

Regards,

Greg

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
PTommins wrote:Thanks for the great info. How will this compare with the 09 Silverado SB? I thoroughly enjoyed that one !



No idea, not tried it. Nor Indeed the Jana one, which I missed, and Scott Harvey knows how to make his whites!
Maybe you can infer some comparisons by looking at the rat/wooter and CT comments, and reading between the lines by the way they describe them.
I edited my previous post too, for clarity.

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
richardhod wrote:If you're not sure about SB, this is almost certainly the most approachable kind of SB style you'll find, and probably my favourite kind of summer wine (great Rieslings are for all-year round;). The NZ cooler weather ones are rather more extreme, and the Rasmussen SB is much more like a NZ SB, with more intense gooseberry and grass than this, and less rounded perhaps, concentrating on thoe flavours intensely. Also not a grapefruit bomb, but it is a singular experience.
This style is worth trying as a contrast, being lighter and more relaxed in its approach, and have more of the tropical and other flavours mentioned by people above. The Wellington SB which I liked even better than the Rasmussen is probably in between the two.

Incidentally, the South African SBs I have drunk mainly in South Africa, and I don't know whether they export any here (of any quality).



Did you get any of the Domaine de la Perrière Sancerre from LB? If so, where would that fit on this spectrum?

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

longmeadowranch


quality posts: 7 Private Messages longmeadowranch
chipandstephanie wrote:I am not sure your interpretation of the GA law is correct (but I am perfectly willing to admit that I may be the one who is wrong). If you can only ship to customers who make the purchase themselves onsite, then that should preclude Georgia from ALL wine.woot offerings. Thankfully, that is not the case.

If I am correct, the lack of availability to Georgia on this deal is due to the fact that the winery itself did not purchase a permit to ship to Georgia. That would be the winery's fault, not the State of Georgia.

So then (and still assuming that I am correct), is this a case wherein the winery was simply not aware that they could obtain a permit to ship to Georgia, or did the winery purposefully decide NOT to obtain the permit?

If the former, we wish you a warm welcome from your soon-to-be customers in the Peach State. If the latter, you may chastise us for not buying enough of your wine to make the permit profitable.

[Edited to correct punctuation.]



GA changed their license application renewal process for 2012. We did ship previously, but because of an unreasonably restrictive process we did not renew for 2012. I suspect other vendors may not have updated their shipping policies for the year or are out of compliance.

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
North316 wrote:Did you get any of the Domaine de la Perrière Sancerre from LB? If so, where would that fit on this spectrum?



LOL I'm really not an expert, but just culling what I can from remembering my recent SB drinking. Sancerre is a Loire wine, and therefore cooler climate, grassy and perhaps gooseberry, often with mineral from the chalk soil. From memory, and I haven't had any quality ones recently, but a couple of adequate offerings, they are less intense than NZ SBs, but not warm enough to get the relaxed tropicals of the South African ones. But I wasn't trying top-end Sancerre, and it's been far too long since I did and my palate has evolved far too much!

Generally, quality French dry white wine is more austere, less overtly fruity and has more malic and old-word acidic undertones, looking for rounded subtle complexity in the acids and phenolics (or whatever you call the harsher, subtler non-fruit white-wine flavours) as well as the fruit. They may be less obviouly fruit-n-herb driven, more austere and less accessible to new-world drinkers, but cellar longer. I've no idea if they use ML or on-the-lees either, but I believe not.

I think you've catalysed me to dredge out memories and analysis to the edge of my knowledge now! With any luck, rpm, Scott or another can provide more experienced enlightenment

LB?

EDIT the Wikipedias are interesting on the subject:
"Sancerre is often compared to neighboring Pouilly-Fumé which also specializes in 100% Sauvignon blanc wines, and while there are some differences, wine experts like Robinson, Johnson and Karen MacNeil note that only very experienced tasters can distinguish the differences in a blind tasting.[6][13] Broadly speaking, Sancerre tends to have a fuller body with more pronounced aromas, while Pouilly-Fumé wines are more perfumed. However, both wines have naturally high acidity and the potential to exhibit the minerally, flinty notes described as pierre à fusil or gunflint, as well as citrus and spicy notes.[12]
Similarly Sancerre is compared to Sauvignon blancs produced around the globe. According to Master of wine Mary Ewing-Mulligan, Sancerre tends to be less herbaceous and grassy than Sauvignon blancs from New Zealand and the Alto-Adige and Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of Italy. Compared to Sauvignon blanc grown in Bordeaux, which are often blended with Semillon, Sancerre can be both more concentrated with more racy acidity. When contrasted with New World examples from California, Washington, Chile and South Africa, Sancerre tends to exhibit more assertive mineral flavors.[12]"

patrickkarcher


quality posts: 3 Private Messages patrickkarcher
strongry wrote:This looked really interesting, and great to have on hand for the summer. So, I was drawn to ordering, but I have a concussion, so I was a bit hesitant to order booze given my mentally addled state. But, my brother visited Long Meadow Ranch last year and raved about it. Just talked to him and he said it was a steal, and what with him not having a concussion, in for one! I bet that post made total sense.



That's a quality post, right?

As for me, I'm in for 2. Oi. SWMBO's favorites is Sauv Blanc, and we're plum out. And she in particular likes citrus, citrus within citrus. Grassy is okay, but not the star in her book. So this sounds right up her alley, and a great value. So, since I love my wife so much, I had to get it, right?

Problem is, I'm now way in the hole, because I bought the reds yesterday (such a great deal, I couldn't pass it up, right?), and some Gazzi Pinot, because who could pass that up, right?

I've got a strict wine budget, which means (a) I can't afford to pass up good deals, and (b) I can't buy that much. So, wine.woot's fantastic deals lately have caused a bit of a conundrum. I've certainly used April's wine budget up now.

Luckily, I can move some off to co-workers to get some investment back. I'll have to do that, dangit. I least I'm spreading joy.

wolverine1012


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wolverine1012

Tasted this wine over the weekend at a wine festival. Nice long and crisp finish.

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
richardhod wrote:

LB?



LastBottle

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

pfajardo19


quality posts: 9 Private Messages pfajardo19

Just got my order in! Looks like this one will sell out. I notice some comments on the dislike of the typical grassy, super tart, grapefruit bomb SBs from NZ and Australia. I agree and it may be that you have the same issue I have, high taste bud sensitivity. Taste sensitivity refers to the intensity with which you perceive tastes and flavors (6 now to date). People with high taste sensitivity experience tastes, and usually smells, too, as being very strong. They are also able to distinguish individual flavors in a mixture very well. If this is you, you'll probably be overwhelmed by the bright citrus/melon/grapefruit flavors, the tart and somewhat astringent mouthfeel, and the fresh cut grass smells of most Aussie and NZ SBs. Thankfully, there are other wineries out there like Long Meadow Ranch that aren't trying to be another NZ or Cloudy Bay lookalike! Kudos to Long Meadow Ranch! If my wine rack and closets weren't so full of wine, I'd be in for 4!

come2thedarkside

losthighwayz


quality posts: 58 Private Messages losthighwayz

What does gooseberry taste like? Not sure Ive ever had such berry. Thanks!

"The older I get the better I was"

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
North316 wrote:LastBottle



Which is not to ever be confused with LP, or LastPosts.

I'm just hanging out, really.

bobalooza


quality posts: 2 Private Messages bobalooza

Dambit we have way too many whites, but this looked too good to pass up. Now we'll have to have neighbors over for a tasting just to make room (and to prevent any possible future spoilage). I FAIL TO SEE HOW THIS WINE.WOOT THING IS SAVING ME ANY MONEY!!! Sorry. I'd better go pour a glass.

EddyGurge


quality posts: 8 Private Messages EddyGurge

Low on whites, almost 80F today. Spring and Summer on the mind. Ok, I'm in.

epistemologonhere


quality posts: 20 Private Messages epistemologonhere
losthighwayz wrote:What does gooseberry taste like? Not sure Ive ever had such berry. Thanks!



Tastes like, er... gooseberries! Great in a nice pie, as are blackcurrants, which are also rare in the US! My mum makes wonderful pies, and rhubarb, and blackberry and apple, and...

___
007

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
pfajardo19 wrote:Just got my order in! Looks like this one will sell out. I notice some comments on the dislike of the typical grassy, super tart, grapefruit bomb SBs from NZ and Australia. I agree and it may be that you have the same issue I have, high taste bud sensitivity. Taste sensitivity refers to the intensity with which you perceive tastes and flavors (6 now to date). People with high taste sensitivity experience tastes, and usually smells, too, as being very strong. They are also able to distinguish individual flavors in a mixture very well. If this is you, you'll probably be overwhelmed by the bright citrus/melon/grapefruit flavors, the tart and somewhat astringent mouthfeel, and the fresh cut grass smells of most Aussie and NZ SBs. Thankfully, there are other wineries out there like Long Meadow Ranch that aren't trying to be another NZ or Cloudy Bay lookalike! Kudos to Long Meadow Ranch! If my wine rack and closets weren't so full of wine, I'd be in for 4!



You guys are making me synthesise my thoughts on SB! the "what is gooseberry" comment reminds me that what I call gooseberry, you may call grapefruit! Once you taste gooseberries, or gooseberry pie, you'll see how much more closely NZ Sauvs taste like gooseberry than grapefruit, so you could call them gooseberry bombs if you wanted. Some are more than that, but you could call the Rasmussen SB a gooseberry bomb if you wanted, though it's a good wine of that type, as although it's got concentrated fruit and grass of that ilk, it's well-made enough to be nicely fresh and a good drink.

Like 25% of people out there, I'm a supertaster, so am sensitive to tannins etc, and find most NZ SBs too big fruit-tart and unidirectional for me for me, and too tart. So I prefer the warmer ones which are less concentrated, and actually often do have a bit of pink grapefruit flavour to them, as well as gooseberry, lime, tropical etc. Just more variety of flavours!

liverman


quality posts: 16 Private Messages liverman
losthighwayz wrote:What does gooseberry taste like? Not sure Ive ever had such berry. Thanks!



Best way I can describe them is like currants (not as red tasting though). More like very tart grapes. Emphasis on tart.

Regards,

Greg