edlada


quality posts: 5 Private Messages edlada

I got a call yesterday morning from my German friend. He wanted to know if I could come and drink some wine that evening. Of course I said yes and he promised an historic evening with some well known Bordeaux wines. What an understatement! We started the night with a bottle of 1985 Haut Brion. You know it is going to be a good night when that was the "worst" bottle we would drink. Next was the legendary 1947 Cheval Blanc, a 1950 La Fleur, and finally a 1961 Latour A Pomerol, all legendary as well. My vocabulary can't do justice to the tasting, suffice to say the wines were most excellent. The only problem is as my friend said, "What do you do after this?" On the bright side he has nine more bottles of the '47 Cheval Blanc and he said we will drink one each year. I can't wait until next year!

My dogs like me, that is important.

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
edlada wrote:I got a call yesterday morning from my German friend. He wanted to know if I could come and drink some wine that evening. Of course I said yes and he promised an historic evening with some well known Bordeaux wines. What an understatement! We started the night with a bottle of 1985 Haut Brion. You know it is going to be a good night when that was the "worst" bottle we would drink. Next was the legendary 1947 Cheval Blanc, a 1950 La Fleur, and finally a 1961 Latour A Pomerol, all legendary as well. My vocabulary can't do justice to the tasting, suffice to say the wines were most excellent. The only problem is as my friend said, "What do you do after this?" On the bright side he has nine more bottles of the '47 Cheval Blanc and he said we will drink one each year. I can't wait until next year!



An experience to savor for the rest of your life!

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

kylemittskus


quality posts: 232 Private Messages kylemittskus

Un-be-lievable!

I need to get some new friends!

If you took any notes, I'd love to read them.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

otolith


quality posts: 24 Private Messages otolith
kylemittskus wrote:Un-be-lievable!

I need to get some new friends!

If you took any notes, I'd love to read them.



Me too! Or at least some with a deep cellar.

That looks like an incredible night. Would appreciate any sort of description you could provide.

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
--John Muir

edlada


quality posts: 5 Private Messages edlada
otolith wrote:Me too! Or at least some with a deep cellar.

That looks like an incredible night. Would appreciate any sort of description you could provide.



Hi Doc Ot. To you and Kyle, I really didn't take extensive notes, without getting too existential, I just kind of wanted to soak in the moment and absorb the greatness I had the privilege to experience without having to think too much and get all analytical if you know what I mean. I have to add, the setting for the evening was fantastic. There were 3 of us, and our other friend owns a restaurant in a 16th century mill with a water wheel. the wheel is still there but non functioning however the raceway is intact and the sound of the water rushing over the wheel added to the ambiance of the old building and the beamed ceilinged dining room. The restaurant was closed so we had it all to ourselves. Dinner consisted of beef soup with green beans, beef tenderloins with Bordeaux sauce and beef rouladen with pickles inside, mashed potatoes and red cabbage. Our friend is a great chef! The shelf running around the wall of the dining room is full of bottles of old Bordeaux, Burgundy and Barolos from previous wine tastings.

The first bottle, the '85 Haut Brion was opened and the nose was full of spice with a strong layer of cassis under that. This wine definitely let you know why Haut Brion is so famous. The color was a strong, rich red and no hint of brown. The first taste was spicy and again a lot of cassis and a bit of acid that mellowed as time went on. The wine tasted fresh with a beautiful balance, and has many more years of drinkability I am sure.

Next was the '47 Cheval Blanc. I think all three of us were shaking with anticipation. After cutting off the top of the capsule, the cork was a little moldy but looked good. The cork screw squeaked a bit going in, another good sign. After a mighty pull about 2/3rds of the cork came out. The last third came out on the second pull. The cork was fairly firm and looked good. I would rather see a cork pull apart like that then to pull out a soft, old saturated cork. Pouring the wine into the decanter revealed a very dark color, almost black in the soft light. Holding the wine up to the light showed a deep, deep red color, no brown, no bricking, just deep and dark. By this time there was much relief that so far the wine appeared sound. My friend poured my glass first and as I held the glass with a slightly trembling hand I took a sniffy snif. Amazing smells of spice, fruit and who knows what else, but all good. Swirling the glass revealed that the wine was very viscous, almost like glycerin with the wine clinging to the side of the glass and slowly sliding down in a heavy sheet just barely forming legs. I don't think I have ever seen that happen before. After the three of us had some wine in our glasses, we took a taste. The mouth feel as expected was heavy in a nice oily, silky way. It is difficult to describe the explosion of flavors on that happened. Incredible structure and power, spice, fruit, and god knows what else. The wine is over 14% alcohol but you couldn't taste the alcohol at all. The flavor just kept exploding on my tongue and I had the feeling this wine might just live forever. There was no sign of it fading or its age, it just kept on going. The wine just kept tasting better in the glass. The deep red color was beautiful. Needless to say I was sad when I drank the last drop. One note on my little sheet of paper said: "The perfect wine!" I know that doesn't quite explain but that is what I felt. Just wow!

Next was the '50 La Fluer. This was another very dark colored wine. It was the only bottle of the evening that had some bottle bouquet or "cellar smell" to it. It was surprisingly sweet and thick with a lot of chocolate undertones. Deep, dark chocolate. The wine was very soft with a deep red color and not unlike a port wine. I believe this one is at or a little past its peak.

The last bottle was the '61 Latour A Pomerol. This was our 4th bottle and after all the wine and food, forgive me if I was starting to fade a little. But somebody had to drink this one so I steeled my self to the task. I thought this wine was the second best after the Cheval Blanc. Like the others it was also very dark red, no sign of any brown. The taste was very rich and complex, also a lot of dark chocolate. A long, long finish.

So those were my notes as inadequate as they may be. Overall all of the wines had fantastic color and flavor. With the exception of the Lafleur, the wines belied their age, they were huge, glorious, and well structured and who knows how many more years they in them have but I would think many. We will just have to keep on tasting and see what happens.

My friend probably got tired of me thanking him for the night of my life. I still can't believe my good fortune to be able to taste wines like these. My friend keeps trying to drink down his cellar with our help but he likes to buy wine too so we aren't making a very large dent. He has between 3,500-4,000 bottles, mostly Bordeaux and Burgundy with a few Italian reds and a little bit of white wine, and about 50 bottles of the really good stuff. It is a tough job, but I am committed to helping him drink drink as much as we can before we die.

My dogs like me, that is important.

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
edlada wrote: He has between 3,500-4,000 bottles, mostly Bordeaux and Burgundy with a few Italian reds and a little bit of white wine, and about 50 bottles of the really good stuff. It is a tough job, but I am committed to helping him drink drink as much as we can before we die.



Where is this at? This sounds like the job a serious woot gathering to me haha.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

otolith


quality posts: 24 Private Messages otolith

That was a great report! Man, I would love to be able to experience some wines like that some day. I do have some '05 Bordeaux that will be sitting for several years that I hope some day I'll be able to enjoy like this.

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
--John Muir

coynedj


quality posts: 7 Private Messages coynedj

Wow.

Congratulations on experiencing something that few people ever will. I envy you.

I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff. Bob Dylan, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues

How on earth did I get 7 QPs?

edlada


quality posts: 5 Private Messages edlada
otolith wrote:That was a great report! Man, I would love to be able to experience some wines like that some day. I do have some '05 Bordeaux that will be sitting for several years that I hope some day I'll be able to enjoy like this.



To me there is nothing like a good Bordeaux except a good Burgundy. I don't have much experience with Cali wines, I left the US almost 16 years ago and although I worked at a winery in Pennsylvania, I didn't get seriously in to wine until I came to Europe. Needless to say with the French and Italian wines and Germany for the whites, you don't see a lot of California wine here and it tends to be expensive. I can't understand why many US wine drinkers prefer the straight varietal as opposed to a blend. With the Bordeaux blends it seems the total is greater than the sum of the parts. Of course with Burgundy it is just Pinot Noir baby, don't you put any Syrah in it please. Even if I ever came back to the US, which is unlikely I doubt I could afford the really great Cabernets, etc. I am just awfully lucky to have found a friend like I have here to share his magnificent cellar with me, I pinch myself every time we get together to drink "any wines" as he says. Anyway, sit on those '05 Bordeauxs for a few more years (10 years minimum from the vintage) and enjoy them!

If any wine.woot! folks ever get to Northern Europe, let me know, we aren't very far from Berlin. I am sure my friend would be happy to entertain some visitors from the US for a little wine tasting.

My dogs like me, that is important.

otolith


quality posts: 24 Private Messages otolith
edlada wrote:If any wine.woot! folks ever get to Northern Europe, let me know, we aren't very far from Berlin. I am sure my friend would be happy to entertain some visitors from the US for a little wine tasting.



When my kids are a little older, we plan on travelling to Germany. They both speak German (their parents, however, do not...yet).

I'll be happy to bring an expensive Cali cab along as well.

"When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the universe."
--John Muir

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
edlada wrote:
My friend probably got tired of me thanking him for the night of my life. I still can't believe my good fortune to be able to taste wines like these.



This sounds amazing! Lucky you, I'm glad you had a great time.

I'm just hanging out, really.

JOATMON


quality posts: 19 Private Messages JOATMON
edlada wrote:The only problem is as my friend said, "What do you do after this?"



I have an answer for your friend: 1795 Barbieto Terrantez Madeira.

Even better would be the 1868 EBH Very Old Boal. That was the highlight of the dinner I attended.

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

sledged


quality posts: 20 Private Messages sledged

Seriously, nice line-up of wines. Jealous!