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quality posts: 14 Private Messages WootBot

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Thomas Alexander Rhone-Inspired Red

Speed to First Woot:
6m 50.000s
First Sucker:
Cskimmer
Last Wooter to Woot:
trifecta
Last Purchase:
2 years ago
Order Pace (rank):
Bottom 27% of Wine Woots
Bottom 31% of all Woots
Woots Sold (rank):
Bottom 43% of Wine Woots
Bottom 43% of all Woots

Purchaser Experience

  • 7% first woot
  • 4% second woot
  • 18% < 10 woots
  • 17% < 25 woots
  • 54% ≥ 25 woots

Purchaser Seniority

  • 6% joined today
  • 0% one week old
  • 5% one month old
  • 19% one year old
  • 70% > one year old

Quantity Breakdown

  • 90% bought 1
  • 9% bought 2
  • 1% bought 3

Percentage of Sales Per Hour

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5%
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1%
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1%
3%
4%
4%
7%
8%
6%
11%
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Quality Posts



Cesare


quality posts: 1587 Private Messages Cesare

Thomas Alexander Rhone-Inspired Red
$61.99 + $5 shipping
CONDITION: Red
PRODUCT: 3 2009 Les Origines
CT link above

Winery website

Facebook

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

Cskimmer


quality posts: 3 Private Messages Cskimmer

On a GSM kick and just can't kick the habit.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus

Ok, winery:

I love Paso. I love the Rhone. But... I just bought a base-level CdP for $20/btl. Convince me to buy this (which shouldn't be too terribly difficult ).

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

Number019


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Number019

I recently enjoyed this wine. It was a bold and bright red. The grip of the tannins were exceptional. It finished a bit harsh on the first few sips, but the palate numbing alcohol content soon mellowed out the finish to a fine, pleasant, relaxing, and comforting smooth warm vanilla velvet.
I definitely will get in on this.

easysailor


quality posts: 25 Private Messages easysailor

In for one. What have been the best vintages for this winery?

I live paycheck to paycheck thanks to woot.

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
Number019 wrote:I recently enjoyed this wine. It was a bold and bright red. The grip of the tannins were exceptional. It finished a bit harsh on the first few sips, but the palate numbing alcohol content soon mellowed out the finish to a fine, pleasant, relaxing, and comforting smooth warm vanilla velvet.
I definitely will get in on this.



I like good CdP and quality, minerally south Rhone wines. But given this is 16% alcohol and pH4, does this stand up to scrutiny?

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus
richardhod wrote:I like good CdP and quality, minerally south Rhone wines. But given this is 16% alcohol and pH4, does this stand up to scrutiny?



CdPs in general have been creeping up in alcohol (reasons debatable), so I wouldn't be concerned about the alc.%. The pH is kind of the question since such numbers are rarely, of ever, available on CdP or any other European wine sold in the US.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

brucedoesbms


quality posts: 158 Private Messages brucedoesbms

I have a difficult time ascertaining what "Rhone-inspired" can really mean... please enlighten....

“Giving a camera to Diane Arbus is like putting a live grenade in the hands of a child.” --Norman Mailer
woot!ism of Assurance: "There is [WAS] no finer market than the one you create for something nobody wants, yet everyone buys... "

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 554 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

richardhod wrote:I like good CdP and quality, minerally south Rhone wines. But given this is 16% alcohol and pH4, does this stand up to scrutiny?


What is CdP?



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Number019


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Number019
ThunderThighs wrote:What is CdP?



CdP = Châteauneuf-du-Pape is the largest and most important wine appellation in the southern Rhône.

An online search will provide much info.

ThunderThighs


quality posts: 554 Private Messages ThunderThighs

Staff

Number019 wrote:CdP = Châteauneuf-du-Pape is the largest and most important wine appellation in the southern Rhône.

An online search will provide much info.

I did Google but I wasn't sure I was finding the right thing. Thanks!!



Customer Service: support@woot.com ••• Allow 1-2 business days for response.
••• ► Woot's Return Policy
◄ ••• ► Did you check your spam/junk folders for a CS reply?
CANCEL?? How to cancel your order in the first 15 minutes!! - except Woot-Offs & expedited orders

kara52783


quality posts: 3 Private Messages kara52783


A short Q&A with the winemaker (Thomas Pitchon) from last fall @ The Garagiste Festival ... http://californiagaragistes.com/uncategorized/get-the-dirt-from-thomas-pitchon-from-thomas-alexander-winery/

easysailor wrote:In for one. What have been the best vintages for this winery?



It seems from the above article that 2009 was their first season so this will be their best vintage by default! Sounds great anyways!



cmaldoon


quality posts: 62 Private Messages cmaldoon
brucedoesbms wrote:I have a difficult time ascertaining what "Rhone-inspired" can really mean... please enlighten....



Rhone reds are typically blends of some combo of these 4 grapes: Syrah, Grenache, Mouvedre, Cinsault. In this case it is a very typical blend high in Syrah and Grenache with a touch of Mouvedre. This is what I'd expect in either a Cotes du Rhone or a Chateauneuf du Pape which are the two main southern Rhone wines.

( CdP = Chateauneuf du Pape. literally: new castle of the pope. It is a very well regarded appellation within the larger Cotes du Rhone appellation. It gets its name because it was an area near the city of Avignon which was the home of several wine loving popes in the 1300s)

2014 - 20 Btl. Fjellene (10 bot), Urraca Chard (10 bot)
Last purchase: 5/3/14

2013 - 75 btl. 2012 - 98 btl. 2011 - 112 btl. 2010 - 30 btl.
My Cellar

CatherineB


quality posts: 3 Private Messages CatherineB

Mr. Picky likes this wine as well.

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316

Woot, please keep offering these $20/bottle offers for at least another month or two. While I would love to try these, I have way to much wine in stock and these higher ticket items are much easier for me to pass on.

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

rmm989


quality posts: 26 Private Messages rmm989
kylemittskus wrote:CdPs in general have been creeping up in alcohol (reasons debatable), so I wouldn't be concerned about the alc.%. The pH is kind of the question since such numbers are rarely, of ever, available on CdP or any other European wine sold in the US.



This alcohol number seems brutal though. I'm very tempted to try it out all the same

CT

michaelvella


quality posts: 12 Private Messages michaelvella
brucedoesbms wrote:I have a difficult time ascertaining what "Rhone-inspired" can really mean... please enlighten....



Look at the blend:

50% Syrah, 42% Grenache, 8% Mourvedre

sdilullo


quality posts: 36 Private Messages sdilullo

How does this compare to the Tallulah Shake Ridge GSM offered on here about a month ago?

We just cracked open our first bottle of that two night ago and it was thoroughly tasty.

my CT | bottles wooted to date: 249
my flying adventures | a mile of road will take you a mile, but a mile of runway will take you anywhere.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus
rmm989 wrote:This alcohol number seems brutal though. I'm very tempted to try it out all the same



I don't think I have a CdP in my cellar (from 2005 or later) that's under 15%. And not considering CdP, Paso is a hot region so the wines are quite often in the high 14% range, and much higher a lot of the time.

All of that said, I'm still on the fence, here.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

knotheadusc


quality posts: 5 Private Messages knotheadusc

In for one. Had me with the "Rhone inspired" description...

thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom


quality posts: 10 Private Messages thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom

Hello all,
I'm the winemaker for Thomas Alexander Winery and I see there are comments about the pH, acidity, and alcohol %.
It is true that alcohols are a little bit higher here in Paso Robles, as it is a warmer climate. During the growing season temperatures are about 90 to 110 F (but cools to about 55 F at night). This allows for sugar maturity in the grape to ripen easily. In order for the rest of the grape to mature - skin color, seed maturity, and tannin- it is necessary to let the grape hang on the vine longer. As a result the acid content in the grape reduces as well.
The outcome of this wine is a very well balanced wine between fruit and acid, with a very pleasant mouthfeel. The color is a deep garnet, but not overly concentrated, showing nuances of the surrounding oak forest, chalky mineral, and oak barrel spices.
Lastly, to compare numbers, many highly reviewed French wines have a pH of about 3.80 and TAs of about 6.5.

CatherineB


quality posts: 3 Private Messages CatherineB
thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom wrote:Hello all,
I'm the winemaker for Thomas Alexander Winery and I see there are comments about the pH, acidity, and alcohol %.
It is true that alcohols are a little bit higher here in Paso Robles, as it is a warmer climate. During the growing season temperatures are about 90 to 110 F (but cools to about 55 F at night). This allows for sugar maturity in the grape to ripen easily. In order for the rest of the grape to mature - skin color, seed maturity, and tannin- it is necessary to let the grape hang on the vine longer. As a result the acid content in the grape reduces as well.
The outcome of this wine is a very well balanced wine between fruit and acid, with a very pleasant mouthfeel. The color is a deep garnet, but not overly concentrated, showing nuances of the surrounding oak forest, chalky mineral, and oak barrel spices.
Lastly, to compare numbers, many highly reviewed French wines have a pH of about 3.80 and TAs of about 6.5.



Hi, and welcome!

Would you say this is a drink now wine, or will it benefit more from aging? Drink now with decant? Lay down how long?

thanks
Catherine

jawlz


quality posts: 12 Private Messages jawlz

Looks interesting. I like a number of Paso wines, and Paso really is the best place I know of in the USA for making Rhone-styled wines. A Paso wines do tend to run pretty hot though, with a pretty high alcohol percentage, and many (to my mind) end up a bit too sweet as well. Though even in the hotter wines, the depth of flavor in many of the wines from the better Paso wineries is pretty amazing.

To the winemaker: where in Paso are you located? And would you compare your wines to any other Paso winery that makes wines of a similar style? How long do you think the wine will hold up given the percentages you ended up with?

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom wrote:Hello all,
I'm the winemaker for Thomas Alexander Winery and I see there are comments about the pH, acidity, and alcohol %.
It is true that alcohols are a little bit higher here in Paso Robles, as it is a warmer climate. During the growing season temperatures are about 90 to 110 F (but cools to about 55 F at night). This allows for sugar maturity in the grape to ripen easily. In order for the rest of the grape to mature - skin color, seed maturity, and tannin- it is necessary to let the grape hang on the vine longer. As a result the acid content in the grape reduces as well.
The outcome of this wine is a very well balanced wine between fruit and acid, with a very pleasant mouthfeel. The color is a deep garnet, but not overly concentrated, showing nuances of the surrounding oak forest, chalky mineral, and oak barrel spices.
Lastly, to compare numbers, many highly reviewed French wines have a pH of about 3.80 and TAs of about 6.5.



What was the barrel treatment on this? How long and what type?

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

winemakertom


quality posts: 1 Private Messages winemakertom
CatherineB wrote:Hi, and welcome!

Would you say this is a drink now wine, or will it benefit more from aging? Drink now with decant? Lay down how long?

thanks
Catherine



Catherine,
This is a drink now wine and I think it can appreciate a little air in the bottle before serving. I opened a bottle last night and it is still holding up very well this morning and should be great for this evening.
The tannin content is not too intense, so it is very approachable now.
It should age nicely for about ten years in the cellar.

thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom


quality posts: 10 Private Messages thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom
North316 wrote:What was the barrel treatment on this? How long and what type?



The wine aged for 12 months in 100% once used French oak barrels, all of which are Bordeaux shaped.
There is definitely an oak profile in this wine, but I didn't want it to dominate the palate completely.

thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom


quality posts: 10 Private Messages thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom
jawlz wrote:Looks interesting. I like a number of Paso wines, and Paso really is the best place I know of in the USA for making Rhone-styled wines. A Paso wines do tend to run pretty hot though, with a pretty high alcohol percentage, and many (to my mind) end up a bit too sweet as well. Though even in the hotter wines, the depth of flavor in many of the wines from the better Paso wineries is pretty amazing.

To the winemaker: where in Paso are you located? And would you compare your wines to any other Paso winery that makes wines of a similar style? How long do you think the wine will hold up given the percentages you ended up with?



So I make wine in a facility located on the East side of 101, but I source all my grapes from a vineyard located far on the West side, situated adjacent to the Tablas Creek Vineyard at 1400 ft. elevation.
I would say this wine could be compared to the wines Tablas Creek, especially in terms of the organoleptic properties - fruit, terroir, intensity, balance, etc. However, they have a much higher percentage of Mourvedre and they produce much more.

hogfatt


quality posts: 16 Private Messages hogfatt

Could not resist. I love me some CdP and I have been wanting to sample some Paso wines.

In for 1, thanks for the offer WD and Thomas Alexander wines.

CT Updating, please wait....

CatherineB


quality posts: 3 Private Messages CatherineB
winemakertom wrote:Catherine,
This is a drink now wine and I think it can appreciate a little air in the bottle before serving. I opened a bottle last night and it is still holding up very well this morning and should be great for this evening.
The tannin content is not too intense, so it is very approachable now.
It should age nicely for about ten years in the cellar.



This and your other comments convince me! Can't wait to try it! Thanks!

littlebunny2012


quality posts: 0 Private Messages littlebunny2012

I had this wine in San Francisco. It's very hard to find. But worth the effort...I like to cellar wine for up to 10 years. How do you feel your wine will age?

North316


quality posts: 107 Private Messages North316
littlebunny2012 wrote:I had this wine in San Francisco. It's very hard to find. But worth the effort...I like to cellar wine for up to 10 years. How do you feel your wine will age?



This one was already answered:

"The tannin content is not too intense, so it is very approachable now.
It should age nicely for about ten years in the cellar."

My CT
"Trust your homies on the net", Clark Smith.
R.I.P. Inkycatz - Feb. 2013

thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom


quality posts: 10 Private Messages thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom
CatherineB wrote:This and your other comments convince me! Can't wait to try it! Thanks!



I'm thrilled to hear this!
Let me know what you think. There is an email link on my website.

neilfindswine


quality posts: 168 Private Messages neilfindswine

Guest Blogger

thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom wrote:Hello all,
I'm the winemaker for Thomas Alexander Winery



Hi Tom; welcome to Woot! I discovered this one down in LA at one of my go-to watering holes, and then met Tom at the Paso Garagiste.

I too can't resist a Paso GSM, and we had a bottle of Tom's "Le Tigre" blend (a little more Mourvedre; a little less Grenache) while dining at Artisan Paso Robles.

Tom's only making 500 cases a year; quality Paso juice here.

I report to winedavid39...
...I like getting PM's from wannabe rodents...

thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom


quality posts: 10 Private Messages thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom

I don't know if I already mentioned this, but this wine in unfined and unfiltered. I kept the wine on the gross lees, and racked only once, right before bottling. I didn't need to sterile filter, as shown by the VA numbers, so a lot of the complexity was retained in the bottled wine.

CatherineB


quality posts: 3 Private Messages CatherineB
thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom wrote:I'm thrilled to hear this!
Let me know what you think. There is an email link on my website.



Will do - one for now, and two to lay down. It'll be interesting to try one in 5 and then in 10 years.

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom wrote:So I make wine in a facility located on the East side of 101, but I source all my grapes from a vineyard located far on the West side, situated adjacent to the Tablas Creek Vineyard at 1400 ft. elevation.
I would say this wine could be compared to the wines Tablas Creek, especially in terms of the organoleptic properties - fruit, terroir, intensity, balance, etc. However, they have a much higher percentage of Mourvedre and they produce much more.



Thank you for your thoughtful, complete and enlightening responses! You obviously know your stuff, and deliberately make the wine this way, and know it works for your terroir and declared style, rather than giving dismissive and defensive comments. Thank you, and I promise you wooters appreciate you and your wines all the more for this!

On research, indeed much CdP is higher-alcohol than I knew, heady stuff, and we all know the Parker loves it... indeed the whole point of many of thewines of the warm South Rhone area is their ripe intensity, body and in the right terroir, complexity. Though there are some excellent longer-lived midweights too, for those who don't like their head blown off!

So now I know, Paso Robles seems ideal for the big end of the GSM wines! Any minerality in yours, BTW? I do like it when the stony soil adds a bit of something to the wine! I picked up some of Charpentier's Gigondas for a steal last year, and it has that wonderful mineral bite!

xrscunningham


quality posts: 0 Private Messages xrscunningham

First of all, I applaud your transparency. Not many winemakers are willing to publish their analytical test results for their wines. Such a low volatile acidity (anything less than 6.0 g/L is low for most red wines) in the face of a high pH is a testament to the ridiculous amount of attention that was lavished upon this wine. Personally, I'm terrified by pH's that exceed 3.8 (spoilage organisms just love the 3.8-4.0 range) and would automatically acidify a must down below 3.8, TA be damned! But then I would not be capable of making such a delicious wine and would have to slink back into the laboratory with my tail between my legs.

Fantastic job, Tom! You just raised the bar for all of Paso Robles.

thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom


quality posts: 10 Private Messages thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom
richardhod wrote:Thank you for your thoughtful, complete and enlightening responses! On research, indeed much CdP is high-alcohol, heady stuff, and we all know the Parker loves it... indeed the whole point of many of thewines of the warm South Rhone area is their intensity, body and in the right terroir, complexity. Though there are some excellent longer-lived midweights too, for those who don't like their head blown off!

So now I know, Paso Robles seems ideal for the big end of the GSM wines! Any minerality in yours, BTW? I do like it when the stony soil adds a bit of something to the wine! I picked up some of Charpentier's Gigondas for a steal last year, and it has that wonderful mineral bite!





I absolutely love the Gigondas. They use up to 80% Grenache in their blends, which appeals to Grenache lovers like myself. Unfortunately it is almost impossible to obtain that white pepper characteristic they get in Gigondas, here in California.
However, Paso Robles does have calcareous subsoil, like Gigondas, imparting some chalky minerality on the wine.
Incidentally, the calcareous soil is one reason the pH tends towards the higher side.

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
thomasalexanderwinerywinemakertom wrote:I absolutely love the Gigondas. They use up to 80% Grenache in their blends, which appeals to Grenache lovers like myself. Unfortunately it is almost impossible to obtain that white pepper characteristic they get in Gigondas, here in California.
However, Paso Robles does have calcareous subsoil, like Gigondas, imparting some chalky minerality on the wine.
Incidentally, the calcareous soil is one reason the pH tends towards the higher side.



Thank you! One of the most tasty Syrahs we've had on woot was Paso Robles' Calcareous 06 Syrah. Very high alcohol, but tasted very good indeed because of the huge limestone minerality.
And.. of course I meant to type "Chapoutier" but you knew that