bsevern


quality posts: 109 Private Messages bsevern
darektrowbridge wrote:Our 2008 Sauvignon blanc is in the tasting room for $18.



That makes for about a 30% discount here, excluding shipping & applicable taxes.

jhkey


quality posts: 51 Private Messages jhkey
darektrowbridge wrote:
This is a skin contacted Sauvignon blanc that is unique for that reason, it is not the same as off the shelf Sb. It now has a little more than one year of bottle age which is ideal for this type of wine.



Darek, I'm not very familiar with white wine making technique. Can you describe how the "skin contact" treatment will impact the flavor and why most SB's don't use it?

Am I correct in my understanding that Chardonnay typically does get skin contact?

"I double the doctor's recommendation of a glass and a half of wine a day and even treble it with a friend."
- Thomas Jefferson (CT)

theaw


quality posts: 2 Private Messages theaw


LABRAT REPORT!!

My friendly FedEx man delivered the golden ticket around noon. Bottle went in to the fridge and I went about my day.

10:00 I pull the wine out of the fridge and head to the store for some snacks--ended up with goat (an herbed chevre with fennel dust and lavender and a cablanca) and sheep’s (manchego and castellano) milk cheeses, figgy spread and loaf of fresh French bread-- then on to a friends house for consumption.

10:30 We pull the cork. At first sniff the nose gives us sour apple and pear. First sip is soft. We taste the pear at the top with a lovely and lasting finish of tart apple and maybe a hint of spice (pepper, perhaps?). Right out of the bottle, this wine is very drinkable, almost chuggable. Matches remarkably well with our cheesy feast.

20 minutes in and it has softened even more. Lovely, round mouthfeel. The BFF says it has “umami”. We are all pretty surprised that the green apple remains the dominant flavor. I’m sure this gem would have opened up and given us more, but we were unable to restrain ourselves from draining the bottle fairly quickly.

End result: though this wine is complex enough to be consumed on its own, it is a perfect compliment to mild and savory appetizers. I would imagine it would make a terrific meal companion (we will certainly find out, as we are likely going to order a fair amount of this particular juice).

We are all wishing we had a second bottle to tear in to...Bon Temps, indeed! Thanks, Woot!

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
texacaliali wrote:Good Morning Darek - can you tell us what's going on in the vineyards right now? Heard the RRV region is a few weeks behind due to the mild weather all summer.



It's totally fogged in right now and the summer has been cooler over all so we are looking at at least a 2 week delay in harvest this year which puts it mid to late September. We've been doing a lot of leaf pulling to open up the canopy and let some light in which helps ripening. But with later harvests comes the worry of early rains and what they could do! Mildew pressure has been high and some growers will be in serious trouble with early rains.

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
jhkey wrote:Darek, I'm not very familiar with white wine making technique. Can you describe how the "skin contact" treatment will impact the flavor and why most SB's don't use it?

Am I correct in my understanding that Chardonnay typically does get skin contact?



The conventional method for white wine production is whole cluster pressing with no skin contact whatsoever. Most wineries choose to make a more neutral style white that will please more people over a broad spectrum. Maybe the term "genericize" (make it generic) is appropriate here?

I compare my style to beer. You have the Lager ales which are at the lightest end of the spectrum and then you have Amber ales which are further down the spectrum toward more full bodied, flavorfull, heavier. I always told people that my favorite white wine was beer! And I meant it. When I finally got some white grapes I decided to make a white wine that I would like which would be more in the Amber ale spectrum. So this is it! The prototype was 6 years ago and I haven't changed it a bit:

I destemm whole berries (no crushing)into 1 ton bins. These bins are stored cold and the berries will soak in the juices over night (roughly 16 hours or so). The next morning I press straight to barrel where the wines will ferment using only yeasts from the vineyard for a duration of 8 months on the lees without racking.

The skin contact, sur lees, and barrel aging allow me to make a white wine with bright fruit and a heavier mouthfeel than typical whites.

redwinefan


quality posts: 74 Private Messages redwinefan

This one sounds interesting. I wish I had it right now since my whites are getting low, but I'm in for the wait. In for 1:

Old World Winery 2009 Bon Temps Sauvignon Blanc - 4 Pack
Current numbers (updated each minute)
First sucker: xtophersd
Speed to first woot: 29m 55.457s
Last wooter to woot: redwinefan

"You need to invest in a corkscrew. Wine is for drinking." -- Peter Wellington

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge

My thoughts on oak:

I like oak as a spice not a sauce, I don't want it to cover up the fruit. A little bit of oak is a nice flavor to my palate.

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
theaw wrote:
LABRAT REPORT!!

20 minutes in and it has softened even more. Lovely, round mouthfeel. The BFF says it has “umami”.



Thanks Lab Rat, I am a mouthfeel geek and I work hard to obtain it!

texacaliali


quality posts: 136 Private Messages texacaliali

Guest Blogger

Darek and his Woody


http://www.flickr.com/photos/texacaliali/6059301639/

WineDavid was my Boss!

jhkey


quality posts: 51 Private Messages jhkey
texacaliali wrote:Darek and his Woody

http://www.flickr.com/photos/texacaliali/6059301639/



Is that appropriate to open at work?

"I double the doctor's recommendation of a glass and a half of wine a day and even treble it with a friend."
- Thomas Jefferson (CT)

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman
texacaliali wrote:Darek and his Woody


http://www.flickr.com/photos/texacaliali/6059301639/



1969 Sauternes? 1943 Bordeaux? Yes...your job is clearly horrible

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

inkycatz


quality posts: 105 Private Messages inkycatz
jhkey wrote:Is that appropriate to open at work?



I say that every day... oh wait, I work here.

I'm just hanging out, really.

wkdpanda


quality posts: 10 Private Messages wkdpanda
klezman wrote:1969 Sauternes? 1943 Bordeaux? Yes...your job is clearly horrible



Chateau Pichon-Longueville !! Yummy. I spent some $$$ on a couple of recent vintages, and thought it was _really_ nice.

----------------
Andy the Wicked Panda

texacaliali


quality posts: 136 Private Messages texacaliali

Guest Blogger

ahh, nice window into a trip of a lifetime for me this past spring. After a week in the Rhone & a couple days in Limoux my first sip in Bordeaux was the 2010 Haut Brion Blanc - price tag of $1100 a bottle. Makes today's Sauvignon Blanc deal a screamer!

Did you guys hear Darek's history on the Vintners Voicemail today? What a humble guy coming from pioneering families of the RRV.

WineDavid was my Boss!

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
jhkey wrote:Is that appropriate to open at work?



after this comment maybe not!

darektrowbridge wrote:Thanks Lab Rat, I am a mouthfeel geek and I work hard to obtain it!
"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

wallaweed


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wallaweed
pfajardo19 wrote:Most are in stainless to preserve the flavor profile, but some winemakers do a small percentage, say 20%-30% in new oak to give it a little more backbone. I think 8 months is way too long for a Sauvignon Blanc. It's not like you're going to age this for 5-6 years to allow the tannins and fruit to properly integrate.



Hey everyone - I'm the assistant winemaker at Old World.

I can tell you the oak is much more noticable on our 2008, but still not nearly as much as you would think from the numbers. The aging isn't as much to add oak flavor as it is to add richness and creaminess, which has definitely happened to this wine. It's not a New Zealand SB, but SB is a grape that can be made in many styles.

tytiger58


quality posts: 74 Private Messages tytiger58
texacaliali wrote:ahh, nice window into a trip of a lifetime for me this past spring. After a week in the Rhone & a couple days in Limoux my first sip in Bordeaux was the 2010 Haut Brion Blanc - price tag of $1100 a bottle. Makes today's Sauvignon Blanc deal a screamer!

Did you guys hear Darek's history on the Vintners Voicemail today? What a humble guy coming from pioneering families of the RRV.



I don't know...considering Haut Brion has been making wine 465 years longer than this winery, the price difference doesn't seem so bad

What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch? ~ W. C. Fields

“Freedom is something that dies unless it's used” Hunter S Thompson




darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
jhkey wrote:Is that appropriate to open at work?



Depends where you work!

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
tytiger58 wrote:I don't know...considering Haut Brion has been making wine 465 years longer than this winery, the price difference doesn't seem so bad



Aha but they weren't all made by the same man! Old World Winery has been around 14 years in case you were wondering, started as a side gig in 1998.

theaw


quality posts: 2 Private Messages theaw
darektrowbridge wrote:Thanks Lab Rat, I am a mouthfeel geek and I work hard to obtain it!



well done and in for 3!

Old World Winery 2009 Bon Temps Sauvignon Blanc - 4 Pack
Current numbers (updated each minute)
First sucker: xtophersd
Speed to first woot: 29m 55.457s
Last wooter to woot: theaw

flowerchild59


quality posts: 23 Private Messages flowerchild59

I wonder if this is Eric and Bill endorsed since it is from Bon Temps??? Would Sooki approve??????????

On the keyboard of life always keep one finger on the escape key.

texacaliali


quality posts: 136 Private Messages texacaliali

Guest Blogger

posted on the https://www.facebook.com/wine.woot

Darek Trowbridge from Old World Winery makes his movie debut: http://winefromhere.com , premiering August 25, in San Francisco.

WineDavid was my Boss!

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod



So, rattage at long last! I decided to do a comparative tasting of the Old World 09 Sauvignon Blanc with Kent Rasmussen's Esoterica Sauvignon Blanc 2010. I might open the Wellington SB later just for devilment, but I'm entirely satisfied with these two at the moment.

Colour:
A pale greeny-clear is the Rasmussen, though this might be the decor. Very clear.
The Old World is definitely a deeper yellow, almost browny yellow, in a mid-light kind of way.
Nose
Wow, these are different:
Rasmussen has that cclear, classic New Zeaand kind of gooseberry nose, with a hint of grass and butter. Refined, promises layers if strong on the fruit.
The OWW (see he cork..) is entirely different. Smells of, hmm, an old house? The glue you find in grandma's cupboard? Burned sugar, perhaps! I can't describe it. Definitely charred! caramel, in the purest, best sense!

Palate: probably 15-20 mins opened in glass, out of fridge. Definitely drink these medium-cool: not too warm, but let them rest 10-20 mins out off the fridge.
Rasmussen: Mmm, not as sharp as I expected! soft-edged SB, not concentrated, but the acid slowly builds up over time in the glass, say 10 seconds, to fill your mouth with yummy acid-style minerality. Soft, mouthwatering, with gentle gooseberry hints, notes of grapefruit, a little gentle soft buttery feel, but only a little, but very subtle ones, and lively lively acidity on the palate which at no point is too sharp, or too malic-sour, or too fruity. Just tastes like clean-style Sauvignon Blanc as it really should. Pehaps a little oak, or was it jsut warming too much, .Definitely keep this one on the down side of 55 degrees. I could drink this all day and it will go with smoked salmon quite nicely I think. Ooh, later on it has a little grape tannin in the end too, I feel. Or it's opening up more. And at no point does it get sour. A masterpiecem and manifestly a SB!

OWW is an entirely different beast. Yet it's also very very good! It tastes aged or something. I wouldn't spot this as a Sauvignon Blanc if you served it after doing the Haka and trouncing me at rugby. Nor if you called it Chateau le Bordeaux-Varietal-Typique. It certainly tastes fumé. Perhaps Ruisseau Sec Fumé, or Couloir Sec Fumé. It is quite malic underneath, but not oppressively so: firm without being overpowering, providing quite a nice backbone, but doucement. A touch of grapefruit, just a hint, to make me think of Sauvignon Blanc at last. And, yes, some butter, but not too much, round or nasty as in the dodgy end of California Chards. Just a little to balance out the malic and brighter acids. Definitely nicely balanced: not austere, so not one for ageing, but also not all butter, and not all grapefruit. Delightful.

It's not as "fresh" as the Rasmussen: it has darker tones, as if it lives in an orange post-apocalyptic world, as a little bright-green-stemmed flower, showing lively ochre petals among the decay and conflagration.

You can drink this on its own. I'd not cellar this, as it's not super high in acidity and lose its freshness, but at this moment now, it's a unique SB the sort of which I've never tasted. Less acidic than the 04 Pouilly Fumé from Michel Redde I had last Sunday, and won't last half as long, but for a young drinker, this is remarkably complex, unusual, and both approachable and interesting! It has enough acid, and plenty of flavour. Neither of these wines relies too heavily on fruit: it's there, lively and present, but not the single-minded track of most Sauvignons Blanc. The Rasmussen is definitely grapefruitier, especially as they warm up, but not too much so: it's just less oaked.

Oak? Can't really taste it: Hmm, that must be the burned flavours! So, not huge fruits, but god acidity, and yes, a little soft tannin on the back end, even a hint of sweetness from it, but only to contrast with the present, gently sharp acidity.It has enough acid to balance the subtle oak: indeed it took me a long time to identify any oak.. it's not unsubtle like most oaked whites you'll try. In fact it's a great white for anyone who likes unoaked whites but always hankers after a bit more complexity!

Congratulations: this is a superlative white wine, and to make it like this so young, is truly wonderful! I drank it on its own, but you could probalby pair it with gentle white fish. It's not strong enough to take the sharpest foods, as it might then lose its focus. Probably best on its own, or with amuses-bouches!

These are wines for connoisseurs, AND for new wine-drinkers. They will be amazed. This is the most original SB I've ever tried, and while there may be deeper, more concentrated, more cuttingly acidic or even more complex whites, this has depth, layers, and balance at this age, and with freshness without astringent acidity. Approachable, yet a wine which shows us some of the nuances and deeper pleasures that drinking good wine can bring. This is a most unusually interesting experience!

Buy this and serve it to all your friends, for as with the Rasmussen SB, they will love it and wonder what one-dimensional rubbish they might normally associate with this grape!

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod

Goes well with steamed clams in garlic and butter too. Meatballs next.

EDIT: Hmm, meatballs are honeyed Teriyaki sort from Costco. A bit sweet for this and makes it tarter and a bit too malic. Brings out some pear and even maybe apricot aromatics in the wine, and definitely clears the palate to make the next meatball more unguently succulent, but I'd stick to classic white wine foods, dry and fresh, with this SB.

cmaldoon


quality posts: 62 Private Messages cmaldoon



Rat Report as Promised:

Ok, so I actually have 3 opinions on this one instead of 5 (my mother and Brother who don't consume much anyway bowed out)

The three opinions are from:

Myself: A mainly red wine drinker with a propensity for Bordeaux varietals. When I go for a white, I tend toward a Sauvignon Blanc with stone-fruit flavors (as opposed to grassy). I am not a fan of Big oaked chards in general.

My Gal: A novice drinker who is learning wines from across the spectrum and can handle/enjoy Reds and whites. She very much enjoys fruity wines and is sensitive to excessive oak. When talking of whites, Unoaked chardonnays get her top ratings.

My Father: A mainly red drinker who occasionally enjoys a white. His preferences in whites tend toward oaky chardonnays.



Our Notes:



Myself:
Color - The wine is a light gold in color but has a slight grey-ish/tan-ish hint. Not a pure gold or greenish gold that I expect.

Nose - Green Apple as others have noted is the most prominent scent I get. A touch of lemongrass brings a bit more brightness to the nose but it is still far rounder and less astringent to whiff than many Sauvignon Blancs I have known.

Taste - Upfront I was greeted by bright apple flavors and some backing acidity. This flavor persisted through the middle of the palate without much else interesting happening. As the flavor faded, I got a creamy, somewhat nutty finish. I likened the finish to some darker beers I have had without the hoppy, bitter finish. (I don't drink much beer and was told I was crazy by the other two tasters so take this comment with a grain of salt.)

Feel – I actually noticed the feel before anything else. The wine is fairly thick and mouth filling / coating. There is a creaminess to it. It is bigger in feel than most whites but lighter than the heaviest chards.

Overall take – I liked it at first because the combination was novel and interesting. Unfortunately after a glass of it I grew weary of it and it just tasted creamy and a bit oaky to me. If I had it to give at a party, I would recommend everyone try some but more for the novelty than the lengthy enjoyment.



My Gal:
Color – See comments by both guys.

Nose – Light (not a whole lot to it). Green apple is the primary fruit, with a hint of citrus behind it. There is an interesting part of the nose that is almost a hint of popcorn, with a sweetness/maple quality somewhat like a popcorn jelly bean.

Taste – A lot of oak throughout; a light maple syrup flavor (without the sweetness), which is strongest at the finish. Strong overall flavor up front and at the finish, but light in the middle. Fruit flavors: apple, citrus without the stringency associated with orange/lemon/grapefruit (possibly starfruit or kumquat?). Fairly dry flavor overall.

Feel – Very smooth throughout, not missing feel/viscosity in the middle even as it lacks flavor.

Overall Take – Not too much complexity, but nice overall. Good wine for a party or dinner where the aim is not to sit and contemplate what you’re drinking, yet still have a decent & certainly palatable drink. I wish there was more solid fruit in it (especially in the middle) to back up the maple-oak flavor.



My Dad:
Color – Odd grey – brown tune to the normal amber color of a white wine. (found this slightly off-putting)

Nose – Light fruit and oak

Flavor – Solid oak with undertones of fruit

Feel – heavier mouthfeel than expected from a SB

Overall take – This wine feels like it is trying to be both chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc at the same time and is failing at both. It is a Sauvignon Blanc, made in a Chardonnay style, starting with an inferior grape. Less than plesant.


Group overall – Curious. An acceptable value at $14 per bottle but not a screaming deal.


See part II here

2014 - 20 Btl. Fjellene (10 bot), Urraca Chard (10 bot)
Last purchase: 5/3/14

2013 - 75 btl. 2012 - 98 btl. 2011 - 112 btl. 2010 - 30 btl.
My Cellar

Lighter


quality posts: 10 Private Messages Lighter

doucement


Well played!

Aslansmom


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Aslansmom



Lab Rat Report:

Upon receiving the email telling me I'd been chosen as a lab rat and that the wine was white, I thought "Uh oh." I'm not a big white drinker and was worried that I would get a Chardonnay, my least favorite. Well, I opened the box and thought "Crap, it's a Chard." Then I saw the label and my interest was piqued...a Sau Blanc that looks like a Chard? Intriguing!

I got home last night from a very long day, excited to sip a crisp, refreshing, fruity SB. I poured a glass, took a big sniff and was struck with...oak! Agh!!! I took a sip...and again, got oak. I figured I would let the wine open up a bit, warm up a bit (admittedly, it was a bit overchilled) and give it a shot again. After two glasses, I just couldn't get into this wine. Too similar to a Chardonnay for me!

I think that this wine could benefit from pairing with a smooth, rich cheese or similar creamy accompaniment. Unfortunately, I just got back into town last night from a week's vacation, so the fridge was rather bare.

alfisti13


quality posts: 1 Private Messages alfisti13

Thanks to the Richardhod review, in for 3. Thanks, mate, thought my credit card had suffered enough during the wine woot-off. Next time try not to make it so DAMN convincing! Always up to trying the new kids on the block...at least new wineries on the block so as not to confuse someone who thought I had no musical clue whatsoever.

We have been in many wine libraries with no books, yet so very much to learn...

texacaliali


quality posts: 136 Private Messages texacaliali

Guest Blogger

Interesting to read all the different LabRat opinions on this groovy Sauvignon Blanc. Love it!

My wine preferences have changed drastically over the last 15 years. The more I learn and drink wine of course, the more my palate changes and certainly becomes more curious. Wish I had taken a picture of that Xmas Tree in 1995 I decorated in "Silver Oak" ornaments and colors I was so proud of. I've come a long way...

WineDavid was my Boss!

lahargis


quality posts: 3 Private Messages lahargis

I am in on this one. I love french over american oak and you had me at "pistachio" :-)

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
richardhod wrote:

These are wines for connoisseurs, AND for new wine-drinkers. This is the most original SB I've ever tried. Buy this and serve it to all your friends they will love it and wonder what one-dimensional rubbish they might normally associate with this grape!



Thanks richardhod! I make this wine to be "uniquely unique" (as one customer put it) and to boldly go where no Sb has gone.

In fact after making Chardonnay I like best what Sauvignon blanc does with skin contact. Especially because Sb can have so much flavor yet you wouldn't know it from most Sb's off the store shelf.

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
lahargis wrote:I am in on this one. I love french over american oak and you had me at "pistachio" :-)



I love pistachio's!

sanity


quality posts: 5 Private Messages sanity

Thanks to the labrats for the honest reviews.

The descriptions make me think about Dry Creek Vineyard's Musque, and what that would have tasted like if aged in oak. I don't like overly oaked wines, and I prefer Chardonnay done in stainless steel, or treated with very light oak. I don't care for the New Zealand style SB that are grapefruit bombs; to me those are as one-note as many of the CA style steel fermented SB. SB is my 2nd favorite white, after Viognier, depending upon the style.

I'm in for one. I'm very curious about this wine.

cmaldoon


quality posts: 62 Private Messages cmaldoon

Labrat Addendum:

We had half the bottle left after last night and decided to pull it out at lunch today. It had been stored in the refrigerator simply re-corked overnight (no vacuum).

The wine seemed significantly different today. The rough edges had smoothed out and the majority of the oakiness had faded.

Color: The greyish brownish hint from last night had faded and the wine looked a slightly greenish yellow as I would expect from a SB (I possibly had poor lighting last night)

Nose: Has faded somewhat but is still pure freshly sliced granny smith apple

Taste: Starts with soft green apple which is backed by acidity that rises from the beginning into themiddle. This fades into a creamyness that is very slightly nutty and any funny aftertastes are gone.

Feel: This still has the same mouth-filling creamy fill that puts it firmly as a chardonnay-light (which for may people including me is a good thing)

I liked this MUCH better today so would decant it (which I find odd for a white). If you decant it, I feel it will not dissapoint at pretty much any gathering yo bring it to. I would love to try this with A fresh steamed Crab.

My girlfriend also thought it was much improved today. I now will say that I recommend it at this price. But LET IT BREATHE!!!

2014 - 20 Btl. Fjellene (10 bot), Urraca Chard (10 bot)
Last purchase: 5/3/14

2013 - 75 btl. 2012 - 98 btl. 2011 - 112 btl. 2010 - 30 btl.
My Cellar

tytiger58


quality posts: 74 Private Messages tytiger58

Really, after reading the rats last night I was wondering which one would recant and switch to the other side

What contemptible scoundrel stole the cork from my lunch? ~ W. C. Fields

“Freedom is something that dies unless it's used” Hunter S Thompson




cmaldoon


quality posts: 62 Private Messages cmaldoon
tytiger58 wrote:Really, after reading the rats last night I was wondering which one would recant and switch to the other side



Hey, when a wine changes THAT much, I have to. I am also willing to give most things a second chance. I am glad I did. That beig said, I found it strange to have a white that needed the decant

2014 - 20 Btl. Fjellene (10 bot), Urraca Chard (10 bot)
Last purchase: 5/3/14

2013 - 75 btl. 2012 - 98 btl. 2011 - 112 btl. 2010 - 30 btl.
My Cellar

klezman


quality posts: 122 Private Messages klezman
tytiger58 wrote:Really, after reading the rats last night I was wondering which one would recant and switch to the other side



I was just waiting to see the two of them duke it out! Couldn't have been two more different reports.

2014: 28 bottles. Last wine.woot: Scott Harvey Red Re-Mix
2013: 66 bottles, 2012: 91 bottles, 2011: 92 bottles, 2010: 74 bottles, 2009: 30 bottles, 2008: 3 bottles My CT

darektrowbridge


quality posts: 13 Private Messages darektrowbridge
cmaldoon wrote:Labrat Addendum:

I liked this MUCH better today so would decant it (which I find odd for a white). If you decant it, I feel it will not dissapoint at pretty much any gathering yo bring it to. I now will say that I recommend it at this price. But LET IT BREATHE!!!



You know when someone brings me a wine they say is good I always have to leave at least a glass for the "overnight test" which to me is one of the most important tests of a wines structure and age-ability. My skin contacted whites have shown to age well so far (oldest is 6 years old).

I am glad it survived your test!

sanity


quality posts: 5 Private Messages sanity
cmaldoon wrote:Hey, when a wine changes THAT much, I have to. I am also willing to give most things a second chance. I am glad I did. That being said, I found it strange to have a white that needed the decant



Your report was just as helpful as richardhod's for me. I suspected this wine might taste good, though different, the next day, and might age a bit, unlike many whites.

Thanks for reporting again.


richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod
sanity wrote:Your report was just as helpful as richardhod's for me. I suspected this wine might taste good, though different, the next day, and might age a bit, unlike many whites.

Thanks for reporting again.



It's possible mine had been pre-aged by Fed-Ex heat treatment...

My next-day tasting was hampered by my having left the bottle in the freezer overnight. Once thawed, still tasted fine, however.