mother


quality posts: 15 Private Messages mother
PedroncelliFamily wrote:WineDavid are you listening?

and ssufish are you looking for a job???



Just make sure you get square with Connecticut first

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily
mother wrote:Just make sure you get square with Connecticut first



We are in the process, but it is about a 3 month process. We'll be ready by then next offering.

jwhite6114


quality posts: 119 Private Messages jwhite6114
PedroncelliFamily wrote:We are in the process, but it is about a 3 month process. We'll be ready by then next offering.



I like the sound of this.

Wait -- that's another one I'll likely purchase; maybe I don't like the sound of this.

CT | | | | | |

kikcolon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kikcolon

are these bottles corked?

PetiteSirah


quality posts: 78 Private Messages PetiteSirah
kikcolon wrote:are these bottles corked?



Yes, they have cork closures; no, they are not likely to be contaminated by unwanted 2,4,6-trichloroanisole.

Hail the victor, the king without flaw
Salute your new master ... Petite Sirah!


"Who has two thumbs and loves Petite Sirah?" ThisGuy!

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily
kikcolon wrote:are these bottles corked?


Do you mean "are they cork finished" or do you mean are they "corked" as in tainted?

They are cork finished, and considering the amount of time our suppliers and our own staff invest in preventing cork taint--I am confident they aren't "corked".

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily

Have I mentioned the fun things you can do with the Rosé?
Try a Pedropolitain:
1 part Dry Rosé of Zinfandel
1 part good friends
1 part good food

Serve chilled--the Rosé, not the friends.

In case you are missing the ingredient of "good friends" or "good food" replace with an additional part of Rosé, the others will magically appear!

pinkzest


quality posts: 0 Private Messages pinkzest

I finally convinced my husband that I needed to try these--in for one!

Somehow, I've never tried a petite sirah before. Until I did a little research, I didn't even realize that it's a different grape from the syrah/shiraz grape. Since everyone's saying this petite sirah is better with some aging, I might need to go try a petite sirah at a tasting just to check out the grape.

rpm


quality posts: 167 Private Messages rpm

I am a rat, but delivery was office and I'm laid up at home today. Efforts are being made to get it here today, but it's uncertain. Full report/comparison to last year when I get it and can taste.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

INTLGerard


quality posts: 58 Private Messages INTLGerard

Guest Blogger

JuliePed wrote:
...About 10 years ago, a group of wine industry types ordered a bottle of our 1968 Pinot Noir and couldn't believe how well it had aged. the rest of the story: Back in those days the wine didn't have to be 75% or more of the varietal and we had added 50% petite sirah to the blend (for color of course since we grew the PN in the warmer end of DCV) and we believe that is what held the wine together--the Petite Sirah rather than the Pinot Noir.

So, the 1999 vintage is doing quite well in the cellar right now although I would take a bottle out now to see how it is coming along--it is at the 10 year mark. We typically suggest 10-15 years in the cellar. We have tasted the 1997 and it is doing quite well--dark and delicious is the perfect description!



They couldn’t believe how well it aged? Did anyone say "...this is Pinot Noir?" Not to say I wouldn’t have enjoyed it but I would imagine the PS had more than a color influence on this age worthy bottle of Pinot Sirah. Just sayin’

Kudos on the informative and entertaining posts...well done!

lindaped


quality posts: 0 Private Messages lindaped

The UPS guy is starting to give me funny looks--I just received my Scott Harvey shipment, about a week after my Lange Twins shipment. I think I'd better let my husband sign for this one!

kikcolon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kikcolon
PedroncelliFamily wrote:Do you mean "are they cork finished" or do you mean are they "corked" as in tainted?

They are cork finished, and considering the amount of time our suppliers and our own staff invest in preventing cork taint--I am confident they aren't "corked".



thanks for the response. i did mean cork finished because i don't have a bottle opener. can you throw one in if buy it?

spudguy


quality posts: 1 Private Messages spudguy
JuliePed wrote:It's Sangiovese!!! Not sure how the Syrah made it into the photo-shoot package.



Those sneaky Syrah's! Always trying to upstage the poor Sangiovese's, and then head down to Australia and hide their identities as Shiraz!

Que Syrah, Syrah...

bkarney


quality posts: 5 Private Messages bkarney
kikcolon wrote:thanks for the response. i did mean cork finished because i don't have a bottle opener. can you throw one in if buy it?



Maybe WD will be able to help you out with one of these next woot-off

CT

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily

Fun things #2
Zin Rosé Floats
In a Martini glass, place 1-2 scoops of Raspberry (or Strawberry)sorbet. Fill glass 1/2 way up the sorbet with Dry Rosé of Zinfandel. Garnish with a chocolate drizzled coconut Macaroon.

This makes quite a presentation. The beautiful ruby-red color of the Rosé playing off the sorbet. And the flavor match of the macaroon and wine is UNBELIEVEABLE!

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily
kikcolon wrote:thanks for the response. i did mean cork finished because i don't have a bottle opener. can you throw one in if buy it?



Buy 2 and you have a deal--you'll have to send email your address to ed@pedroncelli.com

PetiteSirah


quality posts: 78 Private Messages PetiteSirah
PedroncelliFamily wrote:Buy 2 and you have a deal--you'll have to send email your address to ed@pedroncelli.com



Now that's motivated salesmanship!

Hail the victor, the king without flaw
Salute your new master ... Petite Sirah!


"Who has two thumbs and loves Petite Sirah?" ThisGuy!

kikcolon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kikcolon

SOLD!!! in fer 2.

rockdawg9


quality posts: 2 Private Messages rockdawg9
PedroncelliFamily wrote:Buy 2 and you have a deal--you'll have to send email your address to ed@pedroncelli.com



Does that go for all of the rest of us suckers?

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily

Lets talk Zinfandel...
Can someone please explain to me where this craze for very high alcohol, raisiny smelling Zinfandel came from? Having lived here all my life, and having Zinfandel be the National Grape of "Dry Creek" (I grew up here BEFORE it was "the Dry Creek Valley") I don't recall it being something that bordered on a fortified wine.
I have come to the point that ordering wine in a restaurant (that doesn't carry our wine)I am loathe to order an unfamiliar Zinfandel. I find so many of them to be hot and pruney. They overwhelm the food and light my cheeks up like Bourbon Street on Marti Gras.

Any thoughts on that monster style? Pro's? Con's?

Winedavid39


quality posts: 197 Private Messages Winedavid39

Guest Blogger

rockdawg9 wrote:Does that go for all of the rest of us suckers?




ah now look what you've done...

PetiteSirah


quality posts: 78 Private Messages PetiteSirah
PedroncelliFamily wrote:Lets talk Zinfandel...
Can someone please explain to me where this fad of very high alcohol, raisiny smelling Zinfandel craze came from? Having grown up here, and having Zinfandel be the National Grape of "Dry Creek" (I grew up here BEFORE it was "the Dry Creek Valley" I don't recall it being something that bordered on a fortified wine.
I have come to the point that ordering wine in a restaurant (that doesn't carry our wine-OH GOD! RUN!, hiss)I am loathe to order an unfamiliar Zinfandel. I find so many of them to be hot and pruney. They overwhelm the food and light my cheeks up like Bourbon Street on Marti Gras.

Any thoughts on that monster style? Pro's? Con's?



My turley orders arrived last week -- I was a bit scared to see that their Dragon Vineyard Zin (Howell Mtn.) was 16.3% ABV. Yowza!

Hail the victor, the king without flaw
Salute your new master ... Petite Sirah!


"Who has two thumbs and loves Petite Sirah?" ThisGuy!

javadrinker


quality posts: 4 Private Messages javadrinker
PedroncelliFamily wrote:Lets talk Zinfandel...
Can someone please explain to me where this craze for very high alcohol, raisiny smelling Zinfandel came from? Having lived here all my life, and having Zinfandel be the National Grape of "Dry Creek" (I grew up here BEFORE it was "the Dry Creek Valley") I don't recall it being something that bordered on a fortified wine.
I have come to the point that ordering wine in a restaurant (that doesn't carry our wine)I am loathe to order an unfamiliar Zinfandel. I find so many of them to be hot and pruney. They overwhelm the food and light my cheeks up like Bourbon Street on Marti Gras.

Any thoughts on that monster style? Pro's? Con's?



I blame the Lodi crowd. They may not be completely to blame but I remember noticing this type of Zin (high heat, jammy, big, acidic) first with them. It was so bad that it made my old man GERD act up every time I had a Lodi Zin. I'm sure a lot of that has more to do with the climate but some of it has got to be about the current predominant wine making style. Of course, that just leads to the question of which came first, the chicken or the egg? Did they start the style or just followed it?

And the path to drunken poverty continues... Java's Stash at CT

  • Wine.woots: um, lost count.
  • Other woots: um, lost count too. I might have a problem.

gcdyersb


quality posts: 141 Private Messages gcdyersb
PetiteSirah wrote:My turley orders arrived last week -- I was a bit scared to see that their Dragon Vineyard Zin (Howell Mtn.) was 16.3% ABV. Yowza!



Isn't Helen Turlery known for being a proponent of extreme phenolic maturity, which also is accompanied by high sugar/alcohol?

Cabernet Franc: it's not just for blending! It's also for blogging.

JOATMON


quality posts: 19 Private Messages JOATMON

How is the rose in this offering different from your normal rose? Drier, sweeter, ? I bought a couple of bottles of the rose on the rpm trip, and my friend and I were less than impressed.

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily
JOATMON wrote:How is the rose in this offering different from your normal rose? Drier, sweeter, ? I bought a couple of bottles of the rose on the rpm trip, and my friend and I were less than impressed.



The Rosé on the RPM trip would have likely been the 06 (though I can't be sure) This is drier--around .75 with a good high acid. I love it for it's freshness, good acidity and food friendliness of it. It will really fit anywhere you'd use a lighter white wine.

Winedavid39


quality posts: 197 Private Messages Winedavid39

Guest Blogger

JOATMON wrote:How is the rose in this offering different from your normal rose? Drier, sweeter, ? I bought a couple of bottles of the rose on the rpm trip, and my friend and I were less than impressed.



Helen is no longer associated with Turley.
oh and by the way, they won't return my call (very..confident.. those folks )

paryb


quality posts: 17 Private Messages paryb
PedroncelliFamily wrote:Lets talk Zinfandel...


Any thoughts on that monster style? Pro's? Con's?



Zin/Primativo was my favorite varietal for a while, But I'm like you, I can't even order the stuff anymore because I hate the fruit bombs so much. When you have to chill your wine to 55° or risk burning your tongue then the alcohol is too high fer bob's sake.

On the other hand, say Scott Harvey's zin, with that awesome peppermint oil/anise fragrance...I mean wow, talk about mind numbing awesomeness in a 4oz glass...reminds me why I drink this stuff every night.

189 Bottles of wine from Woot so far!
$3319.36or a mere $17.56 per bottle.

wine.woot Keeping Paryb in the red(and sometimes white) since 5/9/2007

rpm


quality posts: 167 Private Messages rpm
PedroncelliFamily wrote:Lets talk Zinfandel...
Can someone please explain to me where this craze for very high alcohol, raisiny smelling Zinfandel came from? Having lived here all my life, and having Zinfandel be the National Grape of "Dry Creek" (I grew up here BEFORE it was "the Dry Creek Valley") I don't recall it being something that bordered on a fortified wine.
I have come to the point that ordering wine in a restaurant (that doesn't carry our wine)I am loathe to order an unfamiliar Zinfandel. I find so many of them to be hot and pruney. They overwhelm the food and light my cheeks up like Bourbon Street on Marti Gras.

Any thoughts on that monster style? Pro's? Con's?



I'm like you, but then we're both Sonoma County boys and remember when Zinfandel ranged from refreshing to simply robust, and the alcohols typically from 12 to 13.5 (remember that a 12.5 label gave a lot of leeway in those days). People mostly drank table wines with food, except a few serious wine drinkers who might have another bottle by itself. Zin almost always went with food, was often a major blending component in generics, and was often blended itself even in bottles labeled as varietal zinfandel.

The first one I remember that was consciously made in this huge high alcohol style was the 1973 Montevina, from Amador. Maybe they made one a bit earlier, but that's the first monster zin I remember. Sutter Home's Amador Zins were sometimes huge and hot as well - back before they became essential a bulk quality house. Paul Draper's Dry Creek fruit Zins were usually relatively big, but Paul always kept them under control. The big Montevinas got a lot of write ups and I think it started the style. When Lytton Springs Winery got going, in your neck of the woods, they were making monsters (the 1979 was pretty good, but the 1980 was too hot). Some of the Amador guys were making late harvest zins about that time too -- not quite port, because it wasn't fortified, but well over 15% and with significant residual sugar. Some were pretty good as dessert wines - I had a box of the 1978 Monterey Peninsula LH Zin from Amador, and there were big zins from the Shenandoah Valley up that way. Remember the "no wimpy wines" slogan and movement? And, then there was the lost decade of the 1980s when nobody wanted Zin - people grafting over to Cab and Merlot, replanting, etc., to get the higher prices paid for those more 'noble' grapes than the 'humble' zinfandel.... Parker hurt Zin pushing Merlot, and then Parkerization of style hit the making of Zin.

It was sort of funny. If you went to sleep in 1975 as a mostly zinfandel drinker, and woke up like Rip Van Winkle in 1995, and bought a zinfandel, you might not recognize it. A few people kept doing it the old way -- you guys among them -- but especially folks like Clos du Val and Frogs Leap in Napa. Guys who used to keep it down, like our friends the Seghesios, have been making them in the huge style. It works with their Italian varietals, but I think you'd find it very instructive to get one of Ted's recent vintages and taste it side by side with yours of the same vintage. Very different from similar locations for the fruit - you'll even know exactly where the fruit's from and how they farm it, I'm sure.

I think you're beginning to see a return, but we're still faced with quite a bit of stylistic confusion. The overbig Zins are consistent with the Parker or International Style. They are popular with people who want huge very ripe fruit aromas that hit them in the nose - not too much subtlety there and reminiscent of the prunes that used to grow between Santa Rosa and the wineries below Healdsburg like Foppiano. I have always preferred zins to have much more fresh fruit aromas that required some differentiating. You know, when the wines are great, the aroma gently fills the room and brings a smile to your lips.

Anyway, that's my very quick and dirty take on it....

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

kevo152


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kevo152
Winedavid39 wrote:Helen is no longer associated with Turley.
oh and by the way, they won't return my call (very..confident.. those folks )



You know what, I have been a fan of Turley for several years. I waited more than a year to get on their list, I have ordered faithfully, and when WD asked us to recommend a winery I suggested Turley.

Now, I'm done. No more orders from me. They won't even speak to WD? Not to mention, I've had better wine from here. Wellington and Little Vineyards come immediately to mind. WD, thank you for offering us great wine from GREAT people.

Winedavid39


quality posts: 197 Private Messages Winedavid39

Guest Blogger

kevo152 wrote:You know what, I have been a fan of Turley for several years. I waited more than a year to get on their list, I have ordered faithfully, and when WD asked us to recommend a winery I suggested Turley.

Now, I'm done. No more orders from me. They won't even speak to WD? Not to mention, I've had better wine from here. Wellington and Little Vineyards come immediately to mind. WD, thank you for offering us great wine from GREAT people.




If you have any more, will you send me a bottle? i love their wines !!

i keeed...

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
kevo152 wrote:You know what, I have been a fan of Turley for several years. I waited more than a year to get on their list, I have ordered faithfully, and when WD asked us to recommend a winery I suggested Turley.

Now, I'm done. No more orders from me. They won't even speak to WD? Not to mention, I've had better wine from here. Wellington and Little Vineyards come immediately to mind. WD, thank you for offering us great wine from GREAT people.


agreed. not particularly easy to deal with. and the veritable catalog of wines that they offer leaves much to be desired.

and yet their Turley Hayne PS is still a standard-bearer for the varietal IMO. it is typically materially more complex than most PS. the 1994 version is to date one of the most beautiful PS's that has ever crossed my lips.

but (as always) YMMCV.

do you know... what biodynamics is?

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily
rpm wrote:I'm like you, but then we're both Sonoma County boys and remember when Zinfandel ranged from refreshing to simply robust, and the alcohols typically from 12 to 13.5 (remember that a 12.5 label gave a lot of leeway in those days). People mostly drank table wines with food, except a few serious wine drinkers who might have another bottle by itself. Zin almost always went with food, was often a major blending component in generics, and was often blended itself even in bottles labeled as varietal zinfandel.

The first one I remember that was consciously made in this huge high alcohol style was the 1973 Montevina, from Amador. Maybe they made one a bit earlier, but that's the first monster zin I remember. Sutter Home's Amador Zins were sometimes huge and hot as well - back before they became essential a bulk quality house. Paul Draper's Dry Creek fruit Zins were usually relatively big, but Paul always kept them under control. The big Montevinas got a lot of write ups and I think it started the style. When Lytton Springs Winery got going, in your neck of the woods, they were making monsters (the 1979 was pretty good, but the 1980 was too hot). Some of the Amador guys were making late harvest zins about that time too -- not quite port, because it wasn't fortified, but well over 15% and with significant residual sugar. Some were pretty good as dessert wines - I had a box of the 1978 Monterey Peninsula LH Zin from Amador, and there were big zins from the Shenandoah Valley up that way. Remember the "no wimpy wines" slogan and movement? And, then there was the lost decade of the 1980s when nobody wanted Zin - people grafting over to Cab and Merlot, replanting, etc., to get the higher prices paid for those more 'noble' grapes than the 'humble' zinfandel.... Parker hurt Zin pushing Merlot, and then Parkerization of style hit the making of Zin.

It was sort of funny. If you went to sleep in 1975 as a mostly zinfandel drinker, and woke up like Rip Van Winkle in 1995, and bought a zinfandel, you might not recognize it. A few people kept doing it the old way -- you guys among them -- but especially folks like Clos du Val and Frogs Leap in Napa. Guys who used to keep it down, like our friends the Seghesios, have been making them in the huge style. It works with their Italian varietals, but I think you'd find it very instructive to get one of Ted's recent vintages and taste it side by side with yours of the same vintage. Very different from similar locations for the fruit - you'll even know exactly where the fruit's from and how they farm it, I'm sure.

I think you're beginning to see a return, but we're still faced with quite a bit of stylistic confusion. The overbig Zins are consistent with the Parker or International Style. They are popular with people who want huge very ripe fruit aromas that hit them in the nose - not too much subtlety there and reminiscent of the prunes that used to grow between Santa Rosa and the wineries below Healdsburg like Foppiano. I have always preferred zins to have much more fresh fruit aromas that required some differentiating. You know, when the wines are great, the aroma gently fills the room and brings a smile to your lips.

Anyway, that's my very quick and dirty take on it....



Don't forget...those prunes ran all the way up to what is now Warm Springs Dam. My house was surrounded by prune trees until about 1967 or 8.

Some of the Seghesio vineyards are directly across the street from the Pedroni-Bushnell ranch-so yes, very similar growing conditions.

Though ours edge up to 15% once in a while, Uncle John still manages to stay away from that over-ripe nose. And his "food-wine" style always has a good acid balance. I have to be careful because I'm always teasing Julie about having a company palate. After all she's been drinking this stuff (though watered-down) since she was 3!

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily
Winedavid39 wrote:If you have any more, will you send me a bottle? i love their wines !!

i keeed...



WineDavid and I had a good laugh about the "supply side" of his business right now. I practically had to beg to get a spot--and then it falls concurrent with the biggest event of the year in "Dry Creek" (old habits die hard)Passport Weekend!

I'll be standing at a register all day tomorrow. I'll be bloging between sales!

rpm


quality posts: 167 Private Messages rpm

The Pedroncelli 2005 Mother Clone Zinfandel arrived around 5:30 pm (thanks to my fabulous wootlegger - WD hint, hint, send him a bottle!)

I just opened the bottle, as SWMBO arrived home. Very initial impression is that this is on a little bigger scale than the 2005. The color is a mid-deep red and brilliantly clear. Full points for appearance. The nose is very tight at this point, but without the sense of being hot I found with the 2005 last year. In fact, tight enough that I'm not going to taste it until it's been open at least 1/2 an hour so it can open up. (I would prefer to give it more like an hour, but SWMBO wants dinner....) What I do get is "vinous" (wine-like) but not yet distinctive.

7:30-ish: Another sniff or two. Beginning to get raspberry fruit; still very tight. Some other things going on - at this point more like a whiff of a ripe raspberry patch across the road than a basket of picked berries.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

psmurf


quality posts: 1 Private Messages psmurf
PedroncelliFamily wrote:WineDavid and I had a good laugh about the "supply side" of his business right now. I practically had to beg to get a spot--and then it falls concurrent with the biggest event of the year in "Dry Creek" (old habits die hard)Passport Weekend!



PedroncelliFamily:
I haven't noticed this question asked(although it was to the last Winery represented here) so I'll inquire.
Which, if any, of these would stand alone?
Some of us prefer to drink wine by itself(occasionally, mostly, or never), and then maybe later with food.

Also, it's good to know that WD hasn't a shortage of suppliers/spots... reassuring that he is keeping the wine flowing on WW.
;)

"If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice."
Neil Peart(of Rush)

0U812


quality posts: 1 Private Messages 0U812
Winedavid39 wrote:Helen is no longer associated with Turley.
oh and by the way, they won't return my call (very..confident.. those folks )



Try for Kathryn Kennedy then...

bradpage


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bradpage

I'm in for 2. Thanks for a great deal. How long do I cellar these for?

Brad

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 232 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
javadrinker wrote:I blame the Lodi crowd. They may not be completely to blame but I remember noticing this type of Zin (high heat, jammy, big, acidic) first with them. It was so bad that it made my old man GERD act up every time I had a Lodi Zin. I'm sure a lot of that has more to do with the climate but some of it has got to be about the current predominant wine making style. Of course, that just leads to the question of which came first, the chicken or the egg? Did they start the style or just followed it?




I think it can be traced primarily to the scores that Parker gave to Larry Turley's first releases. The Turley style was high alcohol, high extract, lots of oak. Within a couple of years half the Zin makers in California started pteractodylling up their wine to try to get Parker points. Quite a few of my favorites stopped making wonderful Zin and started making over the top guppy. (And, yes, some of them did succeed in getting 90+ scores and raised their prices.)

PedroncelliFamily


quality posts: 56 Private Messages PedroncelliFamily
rockdawg9 wrote:Does that go for all of the rest of us suckers?



Uh-Oh