spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
Winedavid39 wrote:too early to implement full scale summer shipping regiment ( but i can tell you it's a big focus for me right now). we ALWAYS keep an eye on unusual temperature swings and will put a temporary hold if things flair up. i feel very confident in our ability to get wines to everyone in good working order- year round.



And speaking from personal experience... if there is a problem with your shipment, 1 e-mail to customer service takes care of it. There was one offer I had that was a sell-out and arrived heat damaged. They couldn't completely replicate my order, so they substituted other bottles for the ones they couldn't provide. Without going into the details, I was extremely happy with what showed up. If every organization had customer service this good, the world would be a much better place.

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

jhudelson


quality posts: 3 Private Messages jhudelson

I do go look for the tasting notes and opinions after receiving wines. I'm always interested to see what others have to say.

Long time wooter but I just changed my sign in name so I'm staring all over. Fresh starts are good at times. My prior 'self' was too personal.

This is an excellent forum. I've purchased many items on woot but alwsys disreguarded the wine woot. My loss. Now I'm locked in on the wine woot offerings. So far I've bought in on:
Roessler Pinot Trio
Mandolina case
Vino Nocetta three pack

I loved the Roessler. I'm a big Pinot fan. This convinced me that the wines offered on wine woot are exceptional values.

We've (the mrs. and I) have delved into a number of the Mandolina bottles. Unlike many who post here, I like to drink the wine not look at it! The Tocatta Reserve was a wonderful red wine. We both thought the Malvasia Bianca was a real surprise. If you ever throw this wine up by itself I'm going to be all over it.

When I caved in to the Vino Nocetto the mrs. said 'I don't like Sangiovese'. She likes it more now, but neither of us are wild about these wines. They are tasty and better than most chianti's that we've had. They need a good marinara sauced food to pair with.

I'd like to see more comments on food pairings. The right food makes such a huge difference with wine. I'll never forget once having a decent pinot with a peanut sauced Thai meal and was amazed at how well it worked.

Thanks to all for the good information and keep it coming.

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
rpm wrote:I have never been very impressed with Cellar Tracker. The notes are usually less than helpful.



I use Cellar Tracker to do just that... track my cellar. If another user is someone I "know" (i.e. I respect their tasting notes) I've listed them as a "favorite" and their tasting notes show up starred. Other than that, I mostly ignore the numbers posted and only occasionally read the notes... unless someone leaves a particularly detailed post.

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

gcdyersb


quality posts: 141 Private Messages gcdyersb
spdrcr05 wrote:And speaking from personal experience... if there is a problem with your shipment, 1 e-mail to customer service takes care of it. There was one offer I had that was a sell-out and arrived heat damaged. They couldn't completely replicate my order, so they substituted other bottles for the ones they couldn't provide. Without going into the details, I was extremely happy with what showed up. If every organization had customer service this good, the world would be a much better place.



Speaking of heat damage . . . . my MacCallums got cooked. Arrived hot to the touch (box was oddly banged up, too) and the cork was pushed up through the capsule in one bottle. Already emailed service. If hot wine pushed up one cork, all three are likely toast, or at least seriously degraded.

Cabernet Franc: it's not just for blending! It's also for blogging.

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu
gcdyersb wrote:Speaking of heat damage . . . . my MacCallums got cooked. Arrived hot to the touch (box was oddly banged up, too) and the cork was pushed up through the capsule in one bottle. Already emailed service. If hot wine pushed up one cork, all three are likely toast, or at least seriously degraded.



yep! The worst part is if you have no physical signs of heat damage and don't come across it until a year later.

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
clayfu wrote:yep! The worst part is if you have no physical signs of heat damage and don't come across it until a year later.




Hey... shouldn't you be drinking wine or otherwise doing something rattish? :p

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

srlancer


quality posts: 2 Private Messages srlancer



I'm a rat! Thanks WD!

Been here for awhile and purchased a fair amount of wine but I'm more of a reader than a poster. Can't say that I know how to describe wine that well but I know what I like and I'll do my best to perform my rat duties.

To give you an idea of where my tastes lie here's a list of past offerings I've enjoyed (in no particular order) -

Penfolds Bin 28 Shiraz
Dry Creek Vineyards Petite Sirah
Little Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon
Wellington Victory Reserve
Calistoga Cellars Cabernet Sauvignon
Ty Caton Tytanium and Field Blend

And the ones I didn't care so much for -

Vino Noceto Sangiovese (I did like the Zinfandel)
Amity Pinot Blanc (but to be fair it was corked)
La Vie '04 Ray's Cuvee Pinot Noir

As luck would have it, I was planning making grilled goat chops with rosemary and cracked pepper and some grilled potato wedges for dinner tonight. I think this should work out nicely.

I hope to get my report up later this evening.

Cheers!

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu
spdrcr05 wrote:Hey... shouldn't you be drinking wine or otherwise doing something rattish? :p



I bet this wine would be really good with a big hearty stew. That's my first impression when I tasted to see if it was heat damaged. =)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Lab Rat Report

MaskedMarvel


quality posts: 11 Private Messages MaskedMarvel

It never ceases to amaze me, the culinary capabilities of wine.wooters.....

BobboinAVL


quality posts: 0 Private Messages BobboinAVL
srlancer wrote:I'm a rat! Thanks WD!

And the ones I didn't care so much for -

Vino Noceto Sangiovese (I did like the Zinfandel)
Amity Pinot Blanc (but to be fair it was corked)
La Vie '04 Ray's Cuvee Pinot Noir



I only recently killed off my remaining La Vie Pinots. I have to admit both lines improved a great deal with time vs. earlier consumption. Can't say they were among the best Pinot Noir I've experienced but certainly held their own after benefiting from more relaxation. Would enjoy a repeat performance.

OK, back to the future...

wolfen18


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wolfen18


Baby Lab Rat reporting in...I call myself a baby because I'm rather new to the collecting and drinking of wine as a hobby, and it is my first rattage. So, forgive the lack of wine lingo as I try to put this into words.

First off, I missed the FedEx guy by 15 minutes. So, I drove into town to pick the wine up at the home base. All good.

I invited a workmate to my house to help my husband and I drink the bottle along with cooking dinner for us.

Opened the bottle and took a sniff...no harsh alcohol cloud...which is a good sign in my book. It smelled of plum and a little bit of cherry.
Poured it in a glass, swirled it around, and smelled again. I really do like the smelling part of wine tasting.

First sip was smooth...fruit was very evident but not in a "big" way.
It finished smooth also...no inherent lingering after swallowing.

We had filet mignons, and this wine went well with the food. We drank the bottle over the next hour. I did not decant, or use my bottle top aerator. To me it tasted good from start to finish.

I am glad to be getting more bottles of this in the mail. I would also highly recommend this to any wooters out there on the fence about this. You will not be disappointed.

And here is a pic of the puppy who wakes me up at 0430 everyday. This was taken almost 4 months ago when he was 5 months old. He's bigger now.

kevinx82


quality posts: 3 Private Messages kevinx82
gcdyersb wrote:Speaking of heat damage . . . . my MacCallums got cooked. Arrived hot to the touch (box was oddly banged up, too) and the cork was pushed up through the capsule in one bottle. Already emailed service. If hot wine pushed up one cork, all three are likely toast, or at least seriously degraded.



Has anyone on the east coast receive Salvestrin/MacCullum/ScottHarvey and experienced this heat damage? It seems like it has been REALLY hot in CA for the past week-ish (all of those offerings were shipped over the past few days). Just wondering if UPS had them stored in their hot box. Although it seems unlikely, just want to make sure.

ahaslett


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ahaslett
kevinx82 wrote:Has anyone on the east coast receive Salvestrin/MacCullum/ScottHarvey and experienced this heat damage? It seems like it has been REALLY hot in CA for the past week-ish (all of those offerings were shipped over the past few days). Just wondering if UPS had them stored in their hot box. Although it seems unlikely, just want to make sure.



My MacCallum is due in Friday up here in NH. Here's hoping...

gcdyersb


quality posts: 141 Private Messages gcdyersb
kevinx82 wrote:Has anyone on the east coast receive Salvestrin/MacCullum/ScottHarvey and experienced this heat damage? It seems like it has been REALLY hot in CA for the past week-ish (all of those offerings were shipped over the past few days). Just wondering if UPS had them stored in their hot box. Although it seems unlikely, just want to make sure.



Sunday was the first day things got really toasty, but if the wine booked it out of here by Friday for cross-country shipping, it probably escaped harm. Wine going down I-5 on Monday, probably not so lucky.

Cabernet Franc: it's not just for blending! It's also for blogging.

rperro


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rperro

Yum! In for one.


My Woots: Veraison Synchrony Duo | Ty Caton Field Blend 3-Pack | Corison Cabernet 2-Pack | Ty Caton 3-Pack | Peltier Station Petite Sirah 3-Pack | Wellington Cuveé R Syrah 3-Pack | Sadler-Wells 3-Pack | Corison Cabernet Vertical 2-Pack | Helix 3-Pack + 1 | Wellington Quartet | Mumm Napa Sparkling Trio | G Saké by SakéOne

srlancer


quality posts: 2 Private Messages srlancer


Okay, well here goes nothing.

I opened up the bottle around 6:45pm as I was starting to prep dinner. Figured I'd pour myself a glass and have a taste just out of the bottle to get an initial impression.

Gave myself a healthy pour into a Riedel O cabernet/merlot glass and gave it a few good swirls. The wine is a deep purply red, very meaty and rich looking. Took a sniff and the first whiff had a fair amount of alcohol in it but I also caught a hint of what I believe to be vanilla and the beginnings of something I can only describe as vegetal. Now for the sip. It's definitely got a fair amount of tannins but not overly so. I did get that non-ripe banana, lost all the moisture in your mouth, lip smacky sensation.

Okay, time to let the wine sit and open up a bit while I prep the goat chops with a bit of sea salt, cracked black pepper and rosemary infused olive oil.

About this time my wife gets home from work so I offer her a glass. She took a whiff and said, "Hmm, smells like alcohol." Then she took a sip and said, "Tastes like Napa, it's strong, I like it." She also added that she tasted cherries, chocolate as well a bit of oak.

I finished grilling up the chops and the potato wedges while my wife made the salad of green leaf lettuce and fresh fennel with a sherry vinegar and O Mandarin Orange infused olive oil dressing (we're big on olive oil in this house).

About 40 minutes have passed and the wine has definitely developed and mellowed. The alcohol smell is gone and it is going down smooth. Now, I'm getting a light oakyness as well as a strong scent of something I think is vegetal but can only describe as reminding me of truffle oil. Paired with the goat chops, I get a light sweetness that wasn't there before. I'm thinking that it reminds me of plums.

After dinner, I pour myself a bit more because it is drinking very well by itself at this point. There's a little less than a half bottle left which me and the missus will probably finish up tomorrow. Will post additional findings if any.

Final thoughts -

My wife thought it was an excellent wine, way better than any we had tried at a wine tasting last week and while we don't know enough to give it any sort of numerical rating, since my wife is in the film business, we'll say we give it 4 enthusiastic thumbs up.

I'm seriously thinking of upping my order to 2 as I'm very interested to see how it will age.

Sorry for the simplistic review, I hope it was helpful.

Cheers!

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu


Guess I must do my labrat duties!

Labrat Review!
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

took a glass out at 3pm (I literally coughed from the alcohol on the nose, which completely subsided 5 minutes later.. my wine storage owner said the same), corked it back up and stuffed it in the fridge. Took it out of the fridge at 6pm, uncorked it at 9:30. All notes are from the 9:30pm tasting with a few wine buddies of mine. Poured from bottle to glass first then rest into a decanter.


Nose: Soft chocolate with ripe red fruit. Light toasted oak with a hit of currant and a touch of alcohol. Over the next hour it softened to a cocoa butter nose mixed with drops of soy sauce and vanilla with hints of tart cherry (alcohol has completely dissipated at this point)

Palate: ripe cranberries and cherries with dry earthy tannins and cedar. The tannins taste like a piece of fresh bark rolled on a forest floor (forest floor is too strong of a descriptor, it's very like earth, it's enjoyable). A finish of green/green pepper with bright tart cherries. The wine is soft on the palate and has a silky mouthfeel before the tannins hit with a bit of an acidic kick. The wine is full bodied and supple without being overbearing and has an almost rustic feeling to it. I would have liked more complexity in the wine, I didn't feel as though I was wading through layers of flavor that perked my interest.

At this point the earthy tannins and green finish were the strongest flavors coming out so not much complexity. An everyday drinker that you wouldn't mind opening. I think it's fine at the $25-30 range. I do feel as though this wine COULD pick up complexity as it ages, like I said, the tannins aren't rough, they are very similar to the deep tannins that you find in young bordeaux. They never really softened up from when i first tried the sip at 3pm till 11pm.

Not really what I expected from drinking the 01. The 01 was a really big ripe blockbuster wine that coated your mouth with fruit and big structured tannins.

Words from my bordeaux/burgundy loving friend: Not bad, not great, fine at $30 considering the vineyard/location. I think this would be well received at Morton's, Ruth Chris. Serve it with a nice red steak and it'll go perfectly well. $60, not so much. Like a wine someone was trying to do old world, but ended up with too much fruit and not enough of the ash/cigar/leather/meat but kept all the dry earthy tannins in.

Words from Mbecker: I'll let him reply himself if he wants to =P

We also drank a 1990 Cronin Joe's Cuvee: Over the hill at first glance, a nose of horrible funk and manure with prune and vinegar are the palate. Wrapped it in plastic wrap and stuck it in the fridge, going to try it tomorrow felt everything was rounding out and it was turning into a better wine. Great almost perfect storage condition.. shows a balance of acidity/PH/alcohol level does not make an age-able wine. Heh.

Drank a 2006 Alcina Russian River Pinot Noir as well: Pop and pour. A nose of fresh red fruit, violet, and vanilla cream. Soft toasted oak and cut strawberries mixed with a silky soft mouthfeel. Nice acidity, could go on for a bit. Not a fan of the plastic cork, bottling $40-70 pinots in plastic is asking for trouble 3-4 years down the road.

wolfen18


quality posts: 1 Private Messages wolfen18

Since I'm new at describing wine, I noticed the term "vegetal" by one of the reviewers. When I was smelling the wine, and tasting it...there was a taste I couldn't place as "fruit". Maybe this is the vegetal I hear people speak of?
Usually when I see that term I expect it to taste like...well...leaves or something.

Also, I really didn't get the big alcohol smell (not like that Dusted Valley Syrah I had the other night...that was an alcohol hurricane blast. I didn't really like that wine at all).

Anyways, I liked reading the other reviews of this wine because it helped me to maybe give words to things I noticed about the wine, but was unable to articulate. It also made me go...Hmmm I didn't get that impression at all.

Thanks to the other reviewers for their good descriptions. Also, to woot for letting a newbie labrat.


rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
clayfu wrote:some notes are better than no notes yes?



well, ymmv, but I usually find my time would have been better spent staring blankly off into space ....

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
clayfu wrote:Guess I must do my labrat duties!

Labrat Review!
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

took a glass out at 3pm (I literally coughed from the alcohol on the nose, which completely subsided 5 minutes later.. my wine storage owner said the same), corked it back up and stuffed it in the fridge. Took it out of the fridge at 6pm, uncorked it at 9:30. All notes are from the 9:30pm tasting with a few wine buddies of mine. Poured from bottle to glass first then rest into a decanter.


Nose: Soft chocolate with ripe red fruit. Light toasted oak with a hit of currant and a touch of alcohol. Over the next hour it softened to a cocoa butter nose mixed with drops of soy sauce and vanilla with hints of tart cherry (alcohol has completely dissipated at this point)

Palate: ripe cranberries and cherries with dry earthy tannins and cedar. The tannins taste like a piece of fresh bark rolled on a forest floor (forest floor is too strong of a descriptor, it's very like earth, it's enjoyable). A finish of green/green pepper with bright tart cherries. The wine is soft on the palate and has a silky mouthfeel before the tannins hit with a bit of an acidic kick. The wine is full bodied and supple without being overbearing and has an almost rustic feeling to it. I would have liked more complexity in the wine, I didn't feel as though I was wading through layers of flavor that perked my interest.

At this point the earthy tannins and green finish were the strongest flavors coming out so not much complexity. An everyday drinker that you wouldn't mind opening. I think it's fine at the $25-30 range. I do feel as though this wine COULD pick up complexity as it ages, like I said, the tannins aren't rough, they are very similar to the deep tannins that you find in young bordeaux. They never really softened up from when i first tried the sip at 3pm till 11pm.

Not really what I expected from drinking the 01. The 01 was a really big ripe blockbuster wine that coated your mouth with fruit and big structured tannins.

Words from my bordeaux/burgundy loving friend: Not bad, not great, fine at $30 considering the vineyard/location. I think this would be well received at Morton's, Ruth Chris. Serve it with a nice red steak and it'll go perfectly well. $60, not so much. Like a wine someone was trying to do old world, but ended up with too much fruit and not enough of the ash/cigar/leather/meat but kept all the dry earthy tannins in.

Words from Mbecker: I'll let him reply himself if he wants to =P

We also drank a 1990 Cronin Joe's Cuvee: Over the hill at first glance, a nose of horrible funk and manure with prune and vinegar are the palate. Wrapped it in plastic wrap and stuck it in the fridge, going to try it tomorrow felt everything was rounding out and it was turning into a better wine. Great almost perfect storage condition.. shows a balance of acidity/PH/alcohol level does not make an age-able wine. Heh.

Drank a 2006 Alcina Russian River Pinot Noir as well: Pop and pour. A nose of fresh red fruit, violet, and vanilla cream. Soft toasted oak and cut strawberries mixed with a silky soft mouthfeel. Nice acidity, could go on for a bit. Not a fan of the plastic cork, bottling $40-70 pinots in plastic is asking for trouble 3-4 years down the road.



Interesting. A couple of questions: you compared the tannins to young Bordeaux. Well, there are Bordeaux and there are Bordeaux....would you compare it to a young AOC Bordeaux, a young Cru Bourgeois (or B. Superiore or B. Exceptionnel) or a young Cru Classe (5? 4? 3? 2? super-2? 1?). And, whichever you mean, I assume you mean wines made after 1985 (since before that anything above CBE was usually almost undrinkable before it was at least 6). Also, what's with the hints of green pepper? That's usually associated with less ripe Cab, yet your other comments concerning chocolate, soy, etc. are more indicative a much riper fruit (perhaps even 'overripe' to some tastes). So, please, if you can, amplify on your and your fellow tasters' impressions. I'm thinking also that the comment about too much fruit and not enough of the ash/cigar/leather/meat but kept all the dry earthy tannins in suggests a combination of very ripe fruit and new oak that hasn't really knit. The earth comments are interesting, too, given that the soils are volcanic, which usually comes out more mineral in my experience.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

boaz38


quality posts: 2 Private Messages boaz38
cheron98 wrote:So... you would exclude yourself, at only a little over 200 posts?



I was referring to the amount of woot purchases: 3 to 10 woots.................

You are such a big sister!

I'm holding my tongue on your comment.

"Do you think it wise to cross blades with a pirate?"

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
wolfen18 wrote:Since I'm new at describing wine, I noticed the term "vegetal" by one of the reviewers. When I was smelling the wine, and tasting it...there was a taste I couldn't place as "fruit". Maybe this is the vegetal I hear people speak of?
Usually when I see that term I expect it to taste like...well...leaves or something.

Also, I really didn't get the big alcohol smell (not like that Dusted Valley Syrah I had the other night...that was an alcohol hurricane blast. I didn't really like that wine at all).

Anyways, I liked reading the other reviews of this wine because it helped me to maybe give words to things I noticed about the wine, but was unable to articulate. It also made me go...Hmmm I didn't get that impression at all.

Thanks to the other reviewers for their good descriptions. Also, to woot for letting a newbie labrat.



There are a couple of categories of things people call "vegetal" or "vegetative" - the most straightforward is the aromas of fresh vegetables, plants or trees (ranging from cut grass and bell pepper to eucalyptus and mint, or more like specific veggies such as asparagus, or olives (green or black), etc.) and the other, a bit less straightforward (also described as 'chemical' - i.e. on Ann Noble's wine aroma wheel) such as cabbage or wet wool/dog.

In very limited amounts, many consider hints of vegetative aromas and flavors like bell pepper or olives or even (the slightest hint of) mint to be acceptable, even desirable, in Cabernet, especially Cabernet picked under 23 Brix. If it becomes dominant, it is usually considered a flaw by most experienced palates. Actual pronounced vegetable smells like cut grass, asparagus, green beans or artichokes in Cab are definitely considered a flaw, and I would ding a wine pretty hard for any of them in a professional tasting. Once you get into more 'cooked' vegetable aromas and flavors, you're getting into the territory of wine so badly flawed as to rate as "unacceptable". You don't see much of it any more, but 30 years ago, if you had a lot of late rain and cruddy conditions, you could well end up with wines that absolutely reeked of wet wool/dog or stinky cabbage. The 1977 Napa Cabernets (with a few exceptions of those who harvested early, like Inglenook) were among the worst for this in my memory. I hope technique has advance to the point wines like that won't often reach the market today. (For a long time, I had a bunch of the '77s I picked up essentially for free that I used as examples of what to avoid like the plague, and to send back if you were served it in a restaurant.) The '72 and '74 Bordeaux were similar.

BTW, as you learn to describe the aromas and tastes of wine, I highly recommend you get yourself a copy of Prof. Ann Noble's Wine Aroma Wheel. It's really very helpful in categorizing aromas and provides a common vocabulary. I don't use it exclusively, because I learned to taste long before she put this together, and I am used to using a lot of other descriptive words, but I do try to work with it, especially on woot.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

eric9tx


quality posts: 8 Private Messages eric9tx
jhudelson wrote:
When I caved in to the Vino Nocetto the mrs. said 'I don't like Sangiovese'. She likes it more now, but neither of us are wild about these wines. They are tasty and better than most chianti's that we've had. They need a good marinara sauced food to pair with.

I'd like to see more comments on food pairings. The right food makes such a huge difference with wine. I'll never forget once having a decent pinot with a peanut sauced Thai meal and was amazed at how well it worked.

Thanks to all for the good information and keep it coming.



If you haven't yet, check out the Drinking and imPairing thread. IMO, it's great for "I'm having *this* for dinner. What would go best with it?" questions. Which brings up another convenience of Cellartracker: anyone can click on my sig line and see what I've got available.

And now for something completely different... I haven't yet opened the '04 or '05 Lupines, but I thought the '03 was very enjoyable with a red meat dinner. Wasn't disappointed in the least.

213 wooted bottles

I saw this wino, he was eating grapes. I was like, "Dude, you have to wait." - Mitch Hedberg

last wine.woots: S.Harvey Trio x2, Krupp, TyC, Wellington Zin vert, Twisted trio, WootCellars Triacipedis x2, Helix, Madison, InZin trio x2, Wellington Victory, (aw crap... I need to update this)
CT

CAGrl


quality posts: 13 Private Messages CAGrl
rpm wrote:(For a long time, I had a bunch of the '77s I picked up essentially for free that I used as examples of what to avoid like the plague, and to send back if you were served it in a restaurant.) The '72 and '74 Bordeaux were similar.

BTW, as you learn to describe the aromas and tastes of wine, I highly recommend you get yourself a copy of Prof. Ann Noble's Wine Aroma Wheel. It's really very helpful in categorizing aromas and provides a common vocabulary. I don't use it exclusively, because I learned to taste long before she put this together, and I am used to using a lot of other descriptive words, but I do try to work with it, especially on woot.


Thanks for your help. I need someone like you to help me with tasting wine. Do you know of any place in Napa or Sonoma that offer a basic wine tasting experience or teachings to help me know what to look for?

Also, thanks for the wine aroma wheel link. Can't wait to check it out.

jcastagno


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jcastagno
kevinx82 wrote:Has anyone on the east coast receive Salvestrin/MacCullum/ScottHarvey and experienced this heat damage? It seems like it has been REALLY hot in CA for the past week-ish (all of those offerings were shipped over the past few days). Just wondering if UPS had them stored in their hot box. Although it seems unlikely, just want to make sure.



i have not received any of these here in Florida and I was a bit worried about them as its been hot here as well...

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
CAGrl wrote:Thanks for your help. I need someone like you to help me with tasting wine. Do you know of any place in Napa or Sonoma that offer a basic wine tasting experience or teachings to help me know what to look for?

Also, thanks for the wine aroma wheel link. Can't wait to check it out.



Glad to help. We're still waiting for your report on my Suggestion for Inducing Spousal Acceptance of Wine Purchases....

I'll think on your first question.... perhaps you should apprentice yourself to Wine David....

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

KruppBrothers


quality posts: 20 Private Messages KruppBrothers

Good morning, Wooters!

Glad to see that some of you have received your '04 Synchrony duo and are already enjoying the wines. From the looks of things, most of the feedback has been very positive. Please keep the feedback coming! We'll check in today to answer any questions.

We definitely appreciate those of you eager enough to crack a bottle right away and enjoy. But my advice would be to save the 2nd bottle for a week or two to let it settle down after going through the stress of shipping.

Have a great day!

iceeblue7


quality posts: 3 Private Messages iceeblue7
jcastagno wrote:i have not received any of these here in Florida and I was a bit worried about them as its been hot here as well...



Received the MacCallum today in Denver. Bottles cool to the touch. No signs of heat damage. No pushed corks no leakage or staining on the press board packing. Will taste the DJ Red tonight and will post in the original thread.

andyduncan


quality posts: 32 Private Messages andyduncan
rpm wrote: Also, what's with the hints of green pepper?



Interesting that both rats picked up on a vegetative/green pepper aspect. Perhaps there was some variation in ripeness between blocks? Or perhaps a ladybug or two got into the crusher? Or perhaps it's just that Cab Franc green pepper that we heard so much about last week poking through despite being an otherwise ripe wine.

Personally I like just a little green pepper.

I'm putting WD's kids through college.

bkarney


quality posts: 5 Private Messages bkarney
KruppBrothers wrote:Good morning, Wooters!

Glad to see that some of you have received your '04 Synchrony duo and are already enjoying the wines. From the looks of things, most of the feedback has been very positive. Please keep the feedback coming! We'll check in today to answer any questions.

We definitely appreciate those of you eager enough to crack a bottle right away and enjoy. But my advice would be to save the 2nd bottle for a week or two to let it settle down after going through the stress of shipping.

Have a great day!



Oh those are the LabRat bottles that our fearless leader sends out to a lucky few. Their good fortune is accompanied by a responsibility to promptly open said bottles and post their opinions on the forum.

CT

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
andyduncan wrote:Interesting that both rats picked up on a vegetative/green pepper aspect. Perhaps there was some variation in ripeness between blocks? Or perhaps a ladybug or two got into the crusher? Or perhaps it's just that Cab Franc green pepper that we heard so much about last week poking through despite being an otherwise ripe wine.

Personally I like just a little green pepper.



I do, too. See my post Here. Could be any of the things you suggest (or other things...), which is why I asked for amplification/clarification....

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

JOATMON


quality posts: 19 Private Messages JOATMON
CAGrl wrote:Thanks for your help. I need someone like you to help me with tasting wine. Do you know of any place in Napa or Sonoma that offer a basic wine tasting experience or teachings to help me know what to look for?

Also, thanks for the wine aroma wheel link. Can't wait to check it out.



My first wine appreciation course was through Santa Cruz Parks and Recreation, taught by someone from Bargetto. The teacher used the wheel for the class, and one of the best parts was trying to identify smells from pure samples (lemon, lime, dirt) in bottles in brown paper bags.

You might check around San Jose and Santa Clara and see if something comprable there.

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

speedoo


quality posts: 41 Private Messages speedoo

Interesting labrat reports, plus helpful commentary from rpm. Is there another labrat that we have not yet heard from?

In any case, I'm hoping for additional comments from clayfu before either purchasing or passing.

gcdyersb


quality posts: 141 Private Messages gcdyersb
clayfu wrote:We also drank a 1990 Cronin Joe's Cuvee: Over the hill at first glance, a nose of horrible funk and manure with prune and vinegar are the palate. Wrapped it in plastic wrap and stuck it in the fridge, going to try it tomorrow felt everything was rounding out and it was turning into a better wine. Great almost perfect storage condition.. shows a balance of acidity/PH/alcohol level does not make an age-able wine. Heh.



What are the pH and TA of this wine? The VA issue sounds like it could have more to do with exposure to oxygen. IIRC, acetobacter convert alcohol to acetic acid best in the presence of oxygen. The presence of Brett characteristics suggest SO2 levels were too low at some point to prevent Brett bloom. SO2 also binds to acetaldehyde, the chemical associated with oxidation. The 'prune' quality also suggests oxidation.

If you've had the wine in your cellar for 15+ years, I suppose we can rule out heat damage. But at the same time a less than ideal closure or insufficient SO2 dosage may be more problematic than the wine itself.

You've mentioned in the past that certain Napa-style wines have been excessively Bretty in their relative youth. Assuming the winery isn't pursuing a Brett-style wine and has good winery hygiene, this is almost without doubt spoilage in the bottle resulting from a combination of residual sugar and high pH (which compromises SO2's effectiveness) giving fuel and a happy home to yeast.

Cabernet Franc: it's not just for blending! It's also for blogging.

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu
rpm wrote:Interesting. A couple of questions: you compared the tannins to young Bordeaux. Well, there are Bordeaux and there are Bordeaux....would you compare it to a young AOC Bordeaux, a young Cru Bourgeois (or B. Superiore or B. Exceptionnel) or a young Cru Classe (5? 4? 3? 2? super-2? 1?). And, whichever you mean, I assume you mean wines made after 1985 (since before that anything above CBE was usually almost undrinkable before it was at least 6). i consider a 96 young for a cru class, but i've drank plenty of 2000-2004 super 2nd down to 5th, with far denser tannins, most recently 2003 PC and 2000 LB Also, what's with the hints of green pepper? you tell me, everyone got massive hints of GP. Also many many ripe cabs have the green pepper taste, but it's purely on the finish, like this wine That's usually associated with less ripe Cab, yet your other comments concerning chocolate, soy, etc. are more indicative a much riper fruit (perhaps even 'overripe' to some tastes) not over ripe, maybe you should try your wine to see, like I said, i was expecting a ripe wine from previous experience, but that's not what I got . So, please, if you can, amplify on your and your fellow tasters' impressions. I'm thinking also that the comment about too much fruit and not enough of the ash/cigar/leather/meat but kept all the dry earthy tannins in suggests a combination of very ripe fruit and new oak that hasn't really knit. you read it out of context. I said it was like a wine trying to be old world but "insert the comments above The earth comments are interesting, too, given that the soils are volcanic, which usually comes out more mineral in my experience. no minerality, at all



Do you think you're putting too much thought into how something "should" taste opposed to how it ultimately tastes?

Chocolate and soy sauce are not indicators of ripe fruit. The chocolate is an indicator from oak not from ripe fruit (you don't smell chocolate in most ripe australian wine)Just a lot of ripe wine use the oak that imparts the chocolate nose. I've had plenty of soy sauce in Bordeaux/white burgundy and they weren't ripe by any means

  • 1983 Château Mouton Rothschild - France, Bordeaux, Médoc, Pauillac (11/25/2008)
    Quick double decant for sediment. Definite browning on the rim of the wine. A nose of cedar, soy, rubber, and cherry lightly floating up. A complex and balanced wine ... the word Balanced constantly ran through my mind while drinking. Stewed fruits, hint of meat and tea leaves with spiced raspberries and soy sauce on the palate. I felt the fruit really struggled to show behind the spice and savory aspects. Fine long integrated tannins ran through the back with a slightly metallic finish. The wine died out in about 2 hours in the glass and tasted like vinegar. (91 pts.)

Posted from CellarTracker

MaskedMarvel


quality posts: 11 Private Messages MaskedMarvel
rpm wrote:...
I'll think on your first question.... perhaps you should apprentice yourself to Wine David....



Actually, not a bad recommendation at all. You'll learn more here from this amazing forum than you can in a wine class.

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
clayfu wrote:Do you think you're putting too much thought into how something "should" taste opposed to how it ultimately tastes?

Chocolate and soy sauce are not indicators of ripe fruit. The chocolate is an indicator from oak not from ripe fruit (you don't smell chocolate in most ripe australian wine)Just a lot of ripe wine use the oak that imparts the chocolate nose. I've had plenty of soy sauce in Bordeaux/white burgundy and they weren't ripe by any means



1. No.

2. Sorry. You clearly know so much more about wine than I do that I should simply defer to your wisdom great clayfu-sensei, and ignore my own experience over the past 50+ years, and the work of Professors Amerine, Roessler and Noble (who associates 'chocolate' and 'soy sauce' with the category of 'caramel') in these matters. Fear not, I shall not ask you for amplification again.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu
gcdyersb wrote:What are the pH and TA of this wine? The VA issue sounds like it could have more to do with exposure to oxygen. IIRC, acetobacter convert alcohol to acetic acid best in the presence of oxygen. The presence of Brett characteristics suggest SO2 levels were too low at some point to prevent Brett bloom. SO2 also binds to acetaldehyde, the chemical associated with oxidation. The 'prune' quality also suggests oxidation.



that was my initial reaction, what you just said. Funny thing is I was out with a few of my friends and someone popped an 82 Montrose that was very heavy in funk. Threw it in the decanter just for the heck of it.. we thought the wine was gone.

3 hours later, notes from my friend

Expressive complex nose though somewhat subdued. Still plenty rich and fleshy though the palate doesn't really seem to have a much to say. The nose really picks up with time in the glass adding some real nice coffee and cedar in a beautiful way.

I figure it doesn't hurt me to let it sit there for a bit.

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu
rpm wrote:1. No.

2. Sorry. You clearly know so much more about wine than I do that I should simply defer to your wisdom great clayfu-sensei, and ignore my own experience over the past 50+ years, and the work of Professors Amerine, Roessler and Noble (who associates 'chocolate' and 'soy sauce' with the category of 'caramel') in these matters. Fear not, I shall not ask you for amplification again.



You're telling me Chocolate is an indicator of RIPEness when Chocolate is imparted from the oak in most California wines?

While you get notes of Soy sauce from Bordeaux hence, bordeaux must be ripe?

I always thought Chocolatey ripe napa cabs were an invention of the present, something your mastery of pre prohibition wines doesn't cover.

I do understand when you say Chocolate + soy sauce = Caramel, I definitely was not clear in my notes to say it was not a blend of chocolate + soy sauce but notes I picked up separately. If that is the case for your belief, that is 100% my fault.

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
clayfu wrote:D

  • 1983 Château Mouton Rothschild - France, Bordeaux, Médoc, Pauillac (11/25/2008)
    Quick double decant for sediment. Definite browning on the rim of the wine. A nose of cedar, soy, rubber, and cherry lightly floating up. A complex and balanced wine ... the word Balanced constantly ran through my mind while drinking. Stewed fruits, hint of meat and tea leaves with spiced raspberries and soy sauce on the palate. I felt the fruit really struggled to show behind the spice and savory aspects. Fine long integrated tannins ran through the back with a slightly metallic finish. The wine died out in about 2 hours in the glass and tasted like vinegar. (91 pts.)

Posted from CellarTracker



A brilliant review before which I stand in awe and quake. A 91 rating for a wine that was vinegar in 2 hours! For a wine that was never considered one of the successes of the vintage. Although it's been over a decade since I last tasted it, I remember the wine. I didn't like it much in the early tastings. You're right about the long finish, though. Cos d'Estournel was much better in 1983 - and I had two cases of it for less that I would have paid for one of that Mouton.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!