apw2123


quality posts: 7 Private Messages apw2123
kevinff wrote:Funny, I remember the bumper sticker from the 80s in California:

"Welcome to California. Now go home."

I guess it goes every which way!



Born in Chicago but there is no better place to live than California. No matter how f'd up our economy gets it beats anywhere else.

Buy wine because you like it, not because someone said that is the wine you should drink.

apw2123


quality posts: 7 Private Messages apw2123
RichSalvestrin wrote:In the Cab program the wines are aged 22-23 months. Each lot in the winery has it's own mix of barrels based on our experience with that part of the vineyard. Once the blend is assembled we figure out what the percentages are of each. It can change from year to year, and 2005 is the first year we actually list Hungarian Oak because it reached a significant level.



Is there anything the Hungarian Oak adds to the wine? A certain taste perhaps?

Buy wine because you like it, not because someone said that is the wine you should drink.

MegFromSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages MegFromSalvestrin

Need an idea as to what to pair with this wine?

Here's the link to our new blog. Be nice. We're new at this.
www.salvestrinwineryblog.com

Filet Mignon with Cabernet Blackberry Sauce and Blackberry Butter, recipe created by Susanne Salvestrin. Or if you are anything like me and can't cook, then come visit us for a Harvest Lunch and have the Salvestrin's make it for you!

schuey


quality posts: 8 Private Messages schuey
MegFromSalvestrin wrote:Has anyone been to the winery? Just curious. We'd love to have you.

We have 26 acres in St Helena (which is why our Cab is 100% Estate, 100% St. Helena AVA) and three generations currently live on the property. Rich's dad, Eddie, helps with the farming and maintains all the fruit trees on property. Susanne Salvestrin (Rich's mom) was a chef for over 17 years and makes the world's best homemade ravioli.

Rusty the dog and Big Red the cat are always around as well, and if you visit in the afternoon you are sure to meet one of the three Salvestrin girls hanging out after school. You may even learn a bit of Spanish from their 5 year old, she schools me all the time.

Come visit next time you are in the valley, we'll give you a private tasting and show you around the property...

397 Main St
St Helena, CA 94574



A bit of an off topic question, but do you have any olive trees that you produce olive oil from?

MegFromSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages MegFromSalvestrin
schuey wrote:A bit of an off topic question, but do you have any olive trees that you produce olive oil from?



We do have olive trees but we don't make olive oil. We have great apples, though, as well as peaches, pomegranates, pears, almonds, tangerines, persimmon, oranges, lemons, nectarines, walnuts. Right now our lemon tree is dripping with fruit and I've had my fill of homemade lemoncello (and my friends won't be polite and take any more) so they are ripe for the picking.

It's a great combo, though...the fruit trees and Susanne Salvestrin being a chef...we all eat and drink very well.

RichSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages RichSalvestrin
apw2123 wrote:Is there anything the Hungarian Oak adds to the wine? A certain taste perhaps?



They are more similar to French than American oak barrels in there subtlety and we began experimenting with them a few years ago when the dollar got beat up by the euro. We are still experimenting with toast levels and vineyard blocks, but like the barrels for both reasons although their popularity is moving the price up.

RichSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages RichSalvestrin
MegFromSalvestrin wrote:We do have olive trees but we don't make olive oil. We have great apples, though, as well as peaches, pomegranates, pears, almonds, tangerines, persimmon, oranges, lemons, nectarines, walnuts. Right now our lemon tree is dripping with fruit and I've had my fill of homemade lemoncello (and my friends won't be polite and take any more) so they are ripe for the picking.

It's a great combo, though...the fruit trees and Susanne Salvestrin being a chef...we all eat and drink very well.



We don't make oil from the olive trees but we do harvest olives and cure them for the table. They are really good.

smartheart


quality posts: 94 Private Messages smartheart

On the fence....great deal on quite a desirable wine....but to do it justice it needs to be laid down for some time....and I just don't have the room/cooling capacity.

If I did I'd be in for 3 sets. Maybe will go in for one set in any event.


"Three be the things I shall never attain: Envy, content, and sufficient champagne."
--D. Parker

RichSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages RichSalvestrin
rpm wrote:I would be very curious to know what the Brix at harvest, alcohol, pH, tA numbers were for the 95 and 96, as they are the wines that you cite to suggest the ageworthiness of this offering. If you were harvesting at 23 or 24 Brix then, was the ABV and pH correspondingly lower and total acidity higher as one might expect?

Also, it would be interesting to understand why are you harvesting riper (and later?) now. How are your yields per acre running on the vineyards (blocs) from which this wine is made, and to what extent do you irrigate?


As you can tell from these questions, my preferences run to traditionally-styled Napa Cabernet Sauvignon (generall) under 14% rigged for the long haul. (I grew up, and trained my CS palate, mostly on the reserves from BV, Inglenook, and Martini from the '50s - '70s)
Thanks in advance.



I don't have the numbers in front of me as I write this but I can tell you that the brix range then that we were targeting was lower. This would also result in lower pH and higher TA. We moved the target over the years not so much based on numbers but with flavor development in mind. This was also based on the market.

I once had a wine shop owner ( one that I have since become good friends with) tell me that if he only sold wines in his store that he liked to drink, he would go out of business.

We have been striving over the years to make wines that are balanced with ripe flavors, acid and pH that allow the wines to pair with food and age yet still be drinkable at release. Never a dull moment, beleive me.

I use the balance word a lot, and it may seem overused but it is so key in everything we do. To relate it to your yield question there is a range that we actually harvest but our target for most blocks is 4 tons per acre. The variables of course are the weather, the soil, the plant density... etc. in the 2005 vintage we were slightly over 5 tons per acre and produced one of the "biggest" wines structurally we ever have.

We use supplemental drip irrigation. There was much lower need for irrigation in 2005 as we had 62" of rainfall (through june 05) for that growing season.

JudyL1118


quality posts: 2 Private Messages JudyL1118

Question...

Since this wine indicates dark chocolate as a tasting note, would it be a nice wine to pair with chocolate of any variety?

I'm planning a ladies night with Wine and Chocolate as the theme. I plan to offer fruit, chocolate, and red wines for the evening.

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rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
RichSalvestrin wrote:I don't have the numbers in front of me as I write this but I can tell you that the brix range then that we were targeting was lower. This would also result in lower pH and higher TA. We moved the target over the years not so much based on numbers but with flavor development in mind. This was also based on the market.

I once had a wine shop owner ( one that I have since become good friends with) tell me that if he only sold wines in his store that he liked to drink, he would go out of business.

We have been striving over the years to make wines that are balanced with ripe flavors, acid and pH that allow the wines to pair with food and age yet still be drinkable at release. Never a dull moment, beleive me.

I use the balance word a lot, and it may seem overused but it is so key in everything we do. To relate it to your yield question there is a range that we actually harvest but our target for most blocks is 4 tons per acre. The variables of course are the weather, the soil, the plant density... etc. in the 2005 vintage we were slightly over 5 tons per acre and produced one of the "biggest" wines structurally we ever have.

We use supplemental drip irrigation. There was much lower need for irrigation in 2005 as we had 62" of rainfall (through june 05) for that growing season.



Thank you for a thoughtful reply with a good bit of information. I certainly understand the importance of market forces - I remember hearing of a family meeting as it became clear Prohibition was ending in which the question was can we afford to make great wine or do we need to make a living? Certainly, a lot of critics, and many who follow them, want wines that are more fruit forward and riper than what I prefer, with higher ABV and pH, and lower TA.

I think, too, I am skeptical whether wines so structured will age as well as what we know from well over 100 years in California (and centuries elsewhere) will age for 10-30 years. Certainly, most of the 1974s -- a highly touted vintage often made in a more forward style than was typical at the time -- did not hold up over 20 years as well as the tighter, more traditionally-made 1973s or even as well as the somewhat riper, but more robustly structured, 1978s.

You were farming your estate during those vintages, and I'm sure your fruit went into some interesting wines. How has your farming changed? I'm guessing at least some (many) of the blocks have been replanted, possibly on different rootstock, possibly different clones. Given those changes, could you make wines similar to the wines made from your fruit in (say) 1970 if you had the same (glorious) weather?

I suppose only another decade or two will tell. Thanks again!

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

RichSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages RichSalvestrin
rpm wrote:Thank you for a thoughtful reply with a good bit of information. I certainly understand the importance of market forces - I remember hearing of a family meeting as it became clear Prohibition was ending in which the question was can we afford to make great wine or do we need to make a living? Certainly, a lot of critics, and many who follow them, want wines that are more fruit forward and riper than what I prefer, with higher ABV and pH, and lower TA.

I think, too, I am skeptical whether wines so structured will age as well as what we know from well over 100 years in California (and centuries elsewhere) will age for 10-30 years. Certainly, most of the 1974s -- a highly touted vintage often made in a more forward style than was typical at the time -- did not hold up over 20 years as well as the tighter, more traditionally-made 1973s or even as well as the somewhat riper, but more robustly structured, 1978s.

You were farming your estate during those vintages, and I'm sure your fruit went into some interesting wines. How has your farming changed? I'm guessing at least some (many) of the blocks have been replanted, possibly on different rootstock, possibly different clones. Given those changes, could you make wines similar to the wines made from your fruit in (say) 1970 if you had the same (glorious) weather?

I suppose only another decade or two will tell. Thanks again!




You bring up a good point about vintage variation. The ageability of various vintages in the 70's. The wines were clearly made in more of the old world style yet some aged better and longer than others. I think the same is true today. Although stylistically the wines are different than 30 years ago there are vintage variations and some wines will age longer than others but on the whole the cycle that we are currently in is demanding ready to drink early. We are aiming for a balance of both drinkability and ageability.

Now that we have our grapes in our bottle we can see what effect our cultural practices play in wine quality. So our farming practices have become more focused on flavor development over the years. You're right again on the decades, it takes a long time to see the real results.

I appreciate your comments.

RichSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages RichSalvestrin
JudyL1118 wrote:Question...

Since this wine indicates dark chocolate as a tasting note, would it be a nice wine to pair with chocolate of any variety?

I'm planning a ladies night with Wine and Chocolate as the theme. I plan to offer fruit, chocolate, and red wines for the evening.



In my opinion chocolate can work if it's not sweet. Bittersweet or dark chocolate would be best and for fruit it would be blackberry, black cherry and raspberry.

Have fun!

Gatzby


quality posts: 43 Private Messages Gatzby
MegFromSalvestrin wrote:Need an idea as to what to pair with this wine?

Here's the link to our new blog. Be nice. We're new at this.
www.salvestrinwineryblog.com

Filet Mignon with Cabernet Blackberry Sauce and Blackberry Butter, recipe created by Susanne Salvestrin. Or if you are anything like me and can't cook, then come visit us for a Harvest Lunch and have the Salvestrin's make it for you!



Great wine always goes well with great food, but I'm curious, is there a match for great wine in everyday food? Any recommendations?

I had a friend that liked to brag she knew what wine went best with Taco Bell, but I suspect there's a happy medium on the level of dining somewhere. =)

Did you know shirt.woot ships internationally? Get you some!
Why do my posts always get deleted? -- Noise Reduction -- Try it in podcast format.
No, you can't have our iPod, keys, or Lego. Sorry.

annsalisbury


quality posts: 4 Private Messages annsalisbury
Gatzby wrote:Great wine always goes well with great food, but I'm curious, is there a match for great wine in everyday food? Any recommendations?

I had a friend that liked to brag she knew what wine went best with Taco Bell, but I suspect there's a happy medium on the level of dining somewhere. =)



I had a nice Mountford Chardonnay with a quickly broiled piece of salmon on a bed of bagged spring greens with tomatoes and mushrooms last night. So, yes.

JOATMON


quality posts: 19 Private Messages JOATMON
MegFromSalvestrin wrote: Right now our lemon tree is dripping with fruit and I've had my fill of homemade lemoncello (and my friends won't be polite and take any more) so they are ripe for the picking.



Can I be your friend? I can be polite at least once...

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
kblais wrote:Why does being in Florida preclude you from ratting?



I'm on vacation. I live & my ship-to address are in Virginia. If WD sent me a labrat bottle it would sit @ FedEx until next Monday (and I'm not at ALL gloating about spending 7 nights on the "Redneck Riviera"). So I'm locked out of ratting Thursday's offering as well.

Next week however, I'll be home with a rested & rejuvenated spirit and palate ... I'm just sayin'... ;-)

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
MegFromSalvestrin wrote:Right now our lemon tree is dripping with fruit and I've had my fill of homemade lemoncello (and my friends won't be polite and take any more)



Friend request #2! And I'm always polite.

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

chinchey


quality posts: 0 Private Messages chinchey

Ok, I'm sold. I told myself I'd wait to hear what the labrats had to say, but it just sounds too good. I had to get an order in for two!

Second, I just want to let everyone know that I'm very impressed by the community that has grown around this. This will be my second w.w order, and it's thanks to the great discussions that I find. It feels so much better to enjoy a wine that I've gotten to know so much about, especially when the winemaker gets to answer questions directly from everyone here. So, cheers woot winos! You've snagged me now too.

txmusicman49


quality posts: 3 Private Messages txmusicman49
kevinff wrote:Funny, I remember the bumper sticker from the 80s in California:

"Welcome to California. Now go home."

I guess it goes every which way!



Or, as some of us here in Texas say "Welcome to Texas; just don't forget to go back home."

LoonBoarder


quality posts: 7 Private Messages LoonBoarder

You got me...

Salvestrin Estate Napa Valley Cabernet - Two Pack
Current numbers (updated each minute)
First sucker: MaskedMarvel
Speed to first woot: 0m 6.453s
Last wooter to woot: LoonBoarder

Dude... wait, what?

druid779


quality posts: 3 Private Messages druid779

Hooray! I just received my first-ever golden ticket! While I am exceptionally busy throughout the afternoon, I have done my due diligence and made dinner arrangements to do justice to this fine-looking bottle and do justice by you fine-looking people ;). Though I am going on my 23rd sleepless hour, I am determined to have tasting notes assembled before I call it a night.

P.S. Thank you WD! I lurked on these forums for quite a while before I felt ready to sign up to be a labrat and I'm thrilled to have been chosen.

jcastagno


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jcastagno

In florida the blue hairs have bumper stickers too: "I dont remember where my home is"

MegFromSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages MegFromSalvestrin

Check us out on Twitter, too...http://twitter.com/SalvestrinWine

annsalisbury


quality posts: 4 Private Messages annsalisbury
RichSalvestrin wrote:Although stylistically the wines are different than 30 years ago there are vintage variations and some wines will age longer than others but on the whole the cycle that we are currently in is demanding ready to drink early. We are aiming for a balance of both drinkability and ageability.



Given the varying opinions about Parker's preferred style (see the "World of Woot Wine" section for more), have you given much thought to using ~5% to 10% of your yield to make an old world style wine? It seems that there is a small but sufficient minority out there who would buy that wine if it were available, and might even pay a small premium for the option.

I know the market is very difficult right now, but I'm hoping that you might have the ability to try it since you have owned the land for so long. I may have read too much between the lines in your prior post, but you seemed a little wistful as well about the stylistic changes the market was demanding.

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
annsalisbury wrote:Given the varying opinions about Parker's preferred style (see the "World of Woot Wine" section for more), have you given much thought to using ~5% to 10% of your yield to make an old world style wine? It seems that there is a small but sufficient minority out there who would buy that wine if it were available, and might even pay a small premium for the option.

I know the market is very difficult right now, but I'm hoping that you might have the ability to try it since you have owned the land for so long. I may have read too much between the lines in your prior post, but you seemed a little wistful as well about the stylistic changes the market was demanding.



Your idea has merit, but it's not so simple as that: it would mean farming a bit differently on some blocks - irrigating less, for example, maybe different cropping, leafing, etc. - and you'd have to decide in advance which blocks to do that with and which to harvest earlier (to get the lower sugar levels). If I were the winemaker, I'd think long and hard before I would consider segregating the blocks ahead of time. It might even (ultimately) involve different rootstock and different clones. SB or RichSalvestrin could certainly say a lot more about it than I can. I'd love to see people try it, but it would be quite an investment in time and money, with an uncertain outcome for the winery.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

INTLGerard


quality posts: 58 Private Messages INTLGerard

Guest Blogger

MegFromSalvestrin wrote:We do have olive trees but we don't make olive oil. We have great apples, though, as well as peaches, pomegranates, pears, almonds, tangerines, persimmon, oranges, lemons, nectarines, walnuts. Right now our lemon tree is dripping with fruit and I've had my fill of homemade lemoncello (and my friends won't be polite and take any more) so they are ripe for the picking.

It's a great combo, though...the fruit trees and Susanne Salvestrin being a chef...we all eat and drink very well.



Heaven sakes...it sounds like you play in the garden of Eden. With a vineyard and a chef no less.

Thanks Eve..I mean Megan for your uplifting participation this week.

hld1970


quality posts: 16 Private Messages hld1970



Imagine my surprise to find a bottle of the 2005 Salvestrin Cab at my door this evening! Thank you, WD. I have uncorked it and taken a whiff:

Nice purple color with long "legs." It smelled a bit "hot" with a strong cedar/wood aroma. I waited about 20-30 minutes and it has softened- now I smell lots of red fruit and coffee. The taste is warm and smooth with hints of chocolate, more red fruit (not sure which one) and a little pepper.

This drinks really well now and I look forward to see how it evolves over time. Unfortunately, we are having pad thai for dinner so it's not an optimal food pairing by any means. Tomorrow night is brisket (yeah, Passover!) so I will share more info then. Hope this helps you fence sitters. Great wine, even greater value.

______________________________________________
"My only regret in life is that I didn't drink more wine." --Hemingway

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
theresa1013 wrote:Is this perhaps a clue that we will be seeing Wellington in the not-too-distant future?



oh yes please! I can only hope. Of course I'm supposed to be on a SIWBM. But here I am reading the forum around the time the rats usually check in...

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

MegFromSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages MegFromSalvestrin
INTLGerard wrote:Heaven sakes...it sounds like you play in the garden of Eden. With a vineyard and a chef no less.

Thanks Eve..I mean Megan for your uplifting participation this week.



Ha, ya, we have a lot of fun here. Come check us out for yourself! Just finished a barrel tasting...ah, tough life.

luckyinla


quality posts: 5 Private Messages luckyinla

After spending a morning slaving over an enormous pot of chicken soup, in preparation for Passover tomorrow, I received the much coveted Fed Ex package! It is still early (relatively) on the left coast, but will decant the Salvestrin cabernet soon. Stay tuned...

The wine seems to be very closed-in and seems to have entered a dumb stage. Sort of a Marcel Meursault.
Paul S. Winalski

my cellartracker
The best use of bad wine is to drive away poor relations.
French proverb

druid779


quality posts: 3 Private Messages druid779

Sorry fellow Wooters, my dinner date cancelled on me . We rescheduled for lunch tommorow. On the bright side, I'll be able to get some shuteye and approach this bottle with my head in the game.

ShannonSalvestrin


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ShannonSalvestrin

This is our first time on Woot and I have to say how much fun it has been. Rich, Megan and I have found ourselves logging in frequently to get the next installment of blogs....which read like a great book. We Can't wait to hear how the wine shows to you lucky wooters who will enjoy it tonight.

On a side note: The Victorian house on the label is an Inn. Give us a call the next time you're planning a trip to the Napa Valley, we would love to have you stay with us on the vineyard. Cheers and Happy Wooting!

MegFromSalvestrin


quality posts: 9 Private Messages MegFromSalvestrin
spdrcr05 wrote:Friend request #2! And I'm always polite.



Glad to hear it!

This year I made Rich and Shannon a few special concoctions..blueberrycello, craisincello, and my favorite...2008 Salvestrin Cabercello! I basically just added a large amount of vodka to the leftover Cab skins and let it infuse for a couple of weeks. Maybe this year I'll make Petite Sirahcello and Sangiocello, too.

Just another perk of hanging around the winery during Harvest...

Winedavid39


quality posts: 210 Private Messages Winedavid39

Guest Blogger

ShannonSalvestrin wrote:This is our first time on Woot and I have to say how much fun it has been. Rich, Megan and I have found ourselves logging in frequently to get the next installment of blogs....which read like a great book. We Can't wait to hear how the wine shows to you lucky wooters who will enjoy it tonight.

On a side note: The Victorian house on the label is an Inn. Give us a call the next time you're planning a trip to the Napa Valley, we would love to have you stay with us on the vineyard. Cheers and Happy Wooting!



Shannon, glad you are enjoying your woot experience. now we've got you !

jhudelson


quality posts: 3 Private Messages jhudelson

This is tempting, but I will admit that 30+ for wine is beyond my norm. Somebody convince me that my life (month/week/year) just won't be the same if I don't cave in and buy this.

Having said that - I LOVE having a delivery truck drive up to my house and drop off some tasty wine. What a treat!

jwhite6114


quality posts: 119 Private Messages jwhite6114
hld1970 wrote:Imagine my surprise to find a bottle of the 2005 Salvestrin Cab at my door this evening! Thank you, WD. I have uncorked it and taken a whiff:

Nice purple color with long "legs." It smelled a bit "hot" with a strong cedar/wood aroma. I waited about 20-30 minutes and it has softened- now I smell lots of red fruit and coffee. The taste is warm and smooth with hints of chocolate, more red fruit (not sure which one) and a little pepper.

This drinks really well now and I look forward to see how it evolves over time. Unfortunately, we are having pad thai for dinner so it's not an optimal food pairing by any means. Tomorrow night is brisket (yeah, Passover!) so I will share more info then. Hope this helps you fence sitters. Great wine, even greater value.



Nice -- looking forward to hearing more, tomorrow.

You've been packed.

CT | | | | | |

richardhod


quality posts: 261 Private Messages richardhod

Hurry w those lab reports, I'm thirsty!

I'm not so bad with the wine or indeed the words when required, but I'm new here. The FAQ isn't all that clear. If I sign up for rat labbing, what's the chance of getting picked, or is it just established people who get the ticket?

Richard

mopsie2002


quality posts: 4 Private Messages mopsie2002
richardhod wrote:Hurry w those lab reports, I'm thirsty!

I'm not so bad with the wine or indeed the words when required, but I'm new here. The FAQ isn't all that clear. If I sign up for rat labbing, what's the chance of getting picked, or is it just established people who get the ticket?

Richard



Haha I dunno...I still haven't been chosen, and I've ordered by the deadline quite a few times. *shrugs* My impression is that most rats probably labrat a couple times per year, I'm assuming they buy by the deadline fairly frequently.

Oregonian through and through <3...even if I call North Carolina my home now.

rpm


quality posts: 177 Private Messages rpm
richardhod wrote:Hurry w those lab reports, I'm thirsty!

I'm not so bad with the wine or indeed the words when required, but I'm new here. The FAQ isn't all that clear. If I sign up for rat labbing, what's the chance of getting picked, or is it just established people who get the ticket?

Richard



While I can't speak for WD or woot, my sense is that the best way to improve your chances of being a labrat (in addition to buying on time and letting it be known that you want to...) is to be knowledgeable about the type of wine offered and to have posted enough for WD to get a sense you'll provide descriptive feedback on the wine that will help people decide to buy (or not) and will stimulate the discussion. People who are known to be interested in one thing or another (e.g. Loweel, aka Petite Sirah, is known to be a devotee of Petite Sirah/Syrah, etc. - so one might not be surprised to see him labrat a PS) That's not to say a newbie won't 'rat, but since ratting is a substitute for being able to taste a bottle before buying, it's important that the labrats provide detailed feedback, not just "oh wow, I loved it". I also think WD tries to get a cross-section of the woot community since there is a range of palates here.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!