themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
JimofNoceto wrote:To add a little to the puncheon (500 l or 130 gallon) versus barrel (225 l or 60 gallon) discussion, the wine ages somewhat slower in the larger puncheons. Because of the bigger ratio of wine volume to (barrel) surface area with the larger vessel, oxidation is slower. Then, fruitiness tends to be preserved, one of our targets.
Jim


thanks ^ 2!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
JimofNoceto wrote:Perhaps more than you want to know, but we started this with a research trip to Tuscany in 1985 (with 2 and 4 year old boys). We visited a number of Chianti and Brunello producers: Isola e Olena, Antinori, Castello dei Rampolla, Argiano, and others. We learned many used large format cooperage for aging their Sangiovese wines. Some were beginning to use smaller, 225 liter barrels, often new oak. We found we usually preferred the fruit and lower oakiness of those aged in larger cooperage. Thus, we typically use puncheons with Sangiovese. New 225 liter barrels typically get "broken in" with OGP Zinfandel or Linsteadt Barbera. After a couple vintages, the used barrels find their way into the Sangiovese program. We usually get about 10 vintages from a barrel or puncheon before it becomes a planter or oak chips for the BBQ!
Jim


JimofNoceto wrote:And to your question, Italians are all over the map with their cooperage use, but probably more toward 225 liter barrels. Not many American wineries use puncheons. The larger size is harder to handle and costs more up front. Also, implicit from my prior comment, if you are trying to get lots of oak flavor in your wine, rather than an accent, you'll probably want barrels and replace them by the third or fourth year of use.
Jim


well, Jim, you can take credit (or my credit card!) for this sale. music (above) to mine ears. in for 1.

do you know... what biodynamics is?

subinsignia


quality posts: 9 Private Messages subinsignia

Okay, I've slept enough and need to get to work. A few comments this AM and later I will add tasting notes for the whole Noceto line if you like.

For those of you who have been to Napa or even Sonoma, the Sierra Foothills is a striking contrast. First off is the geography. Napa's AVA's run along a big, long valley and then shares the Carneros area with Sonoma to the south which issort of lowlands to the north of a flood plain. Sonoma is a few sets of valleys where grapes are grown in their AVAs. The Sierra Foothills are a rolling and tumbling set of hills that remind me of Tuscany. The weather there gives them very hot days and cooler nights, so they get ripeness to make good wines, but the varietals grown there must be suited to grapes that can withstand those temperatures. Most of the wineries make zinfandel. I would guess the second place grape grown is barbera (at least right in the Plymouth area where Noceto is) with sangiovese being less predominant. Up north in Placerville and the surrounding areas they do other stuff and to the south maybe some more of the Lodi varietals (rhone like grapes- the Lodi area stretches way to the east and butts up against the Sierra Foothills/Amador growing areas); wineries like Convergence (south of the 16 Hwy) do kick ass Syrahs and Petite Sirahs. Some growers are also up at elevation and they do some other grapes well while others not so well.

To get to Noceto one must get off Hwy 49 in "downtown" Plymouth and go east on Shenandoah Road a few miles. I put quotation marks on downtown because Plymouth is a tiny little remnant of a mining town. Not much is there. Before Taste opened, the highlight of culinary pleasure was Incahoots, a Mexican BBQ pizza place with a decent enough local wine list. Taste is a fine high level cuisine sort of restuarant. Closed on Tue and Wed, so if you are a midweek traveller be aware those two closed days. A lot of the wineries are closed on Tue-Wed and some on Mon and Thu, too. But many are open 7 days a week.

There is a concentrated group of wineries in the region to the east of Plymouth. Over 20 wineries with tasting rooms are very nearby each other on or off Shenandoah Road. It can make for a great day or even a week of tasting if you are up to it. There are even more wineries to the north and south. It is not commercialized like Napa nor is the traffic a problem. Weekend tasting are not too crowded (I think Kevin mentioned they get over 100 visitors on a weekned day) so it's like Napa in the 80's and early 90's maybe. Very family oriented places with dedicated staffs (well, at least in the smaller wineries; bigger ones like Renwood and the huge Montevina (now Terra d'Oro) owned by Sutter home turn over staff a lot. I've met up with Kevin at least 4 times now since 2004 (he's been around since 2000 I think) and the tasting staff and manager are great folks who are always ready to welcome you at Noceto.

An event to go to that is really fun is their release party. This year it is Saturday April 18th. The new single block and other wines get officially released (they are tasting them now) and there is a big party with food and a band (I think it's the Esquire's again, they are a great blues band from Fresno as I recall and I even got a CD of theirs for $10). It's all free (I don't think any, or very few at least, wineries actually charge for tasting in Amador; Napa runs $10 to $30 and more for library tastings) and it is a spectacular event. They even have grappa classes (more on that later, too!).

So counting the sangio grappa, they make right at about a dozen different sangios or sangio blends. They have a new Pinot Grigio to round out their Italianesque line with a white, a Rosato (a pleasant sangio rose) Nutz (a sangio/barbera blend that is their everyday wine- only $99 a case for Big Nut members), the Normale (I prefer Regular) Sangiovese, the riserva and block sangios, Barbera from Lindsteadt's plot, the OGP zin from the oldest zin vineyard in America (Scott Harvey gets some of this fruit for his 1869 zin and CG d'Arie gets a small fraction for their winery and that's it as I recall)(note- CG d'Arie is run by a Turkish guy who invented Captain Crunch; they opened a new tasting room last year on Shenadoah School Road and they are a fantastic weekend only stop, too), Mistura 180 Degrees Selection(55% Petite Sirah and Alicante Bouschet and 45% Portuguese varietals), the Frivola muscat and the Almirante Port.

Tasting notes later today...

Steve Jones

marekny7


quality posts: 0 Private Messages marekny7

In for 2. Only my second wine woot this year but with all the great comments I could not sit this one out.

First sucker: MarkDaSpark
Speed to first woot: 0m 5.843s
Last wooter to woot: marekny7

CT

txmusicman49


quality posts: 3 Private Messages txmusicman49
JimofNoceto wrote:... We usually get about 10 vintages from a barrel or puncheon before it becomes a planter or oak chips for the BBQ!
Jim



Jim did you ever consider bagging and selling the chips on Woot as a side deal? I'm sure ?WD would help with shipping costs...

kurtswa


quality posts: 14 Private Messages kurtswa

Sorry for such basic of question but
how is Sangiovese different from Chianti?

jplamb


quality posts: 15 Private Messages jplamb
kurtswa wrote:Sorry for such basic of question but
how is Sangiovese different from Chianti?



Sangiovese is a grape and Chianti is a region in Italy. A Chianti must contain at least 75% Sangiovese grapes and be from the Chianti region of Tuscany. So all Chiantis are pretty much Sangiovese but not all Sangiovese is a Chianti.

oblivious87


quality posts: 0 Private Messages oblivious87

yay, my very first Wine woot! This might just become addicting!!!

JanaDahlen


quality posts: 0 Private Messages JanaDahlen

I feel so special...I was chosen to labrat the 2006 Sangiovese. I would love to open the bottle, and provide my thoughts, but I'm expecting a little one so that probably wouldn't be the best idea. I'm going to reach out to my sister and see if she can do a tasting on it tonight and have her post up what she thinks.

I must say, I do love the Sangiovese from Noceto. I ordered last time it was offered, and was disappointed I didn't get more. This time I went in for 3, so I'm stocked up. I highly recommend Noceto.

w.w: 19 s.w: 12 w: 4 k.w:2

kurtswa


quality posts: 14 Private Messages kurtswa
jplamb wrote:Sangiovese is a grape and Chianti is a region in Italy. A Chianti must contain at least 75% Sangiovese grapes and be from the Chianti region of Tuscany. So all Chiantis are pretty much Sangiovese but not all Sangiovese is a Chianti.



Perfect! thanks for clarifying.

rooboy


quality posts: 1 Private Messages rooboy
jplamb wrote:Sangiovese is a grape and Chianti is a region in Italy. A Chianti must contain at least 75% Sangiovese grapes and be from the Chianti region of Tuscany. So all Chiantis are pretty much Sangiovese but not all Sangiovese is a Chianti.




From Wikipedia:

Until the middle of the 19th century Chianti was based solely on Sangiovese grapes. During the second half of the 19th century Baron Bettino Ricasoli, who was an important Chianti producer and, in the same time, minister in Tuscany and then Prime Minister in the Kingdom of Italy, imposed his ideas: from that moment on Chianti should be produced with 70% Sangiovese, 15% Canaiolo and 15% Malvasia bianca. (Malvasia bianca is an aromatic white grape with Greek origins.) During the 1970s producers started to reduce the quantity of white grapes in Chianti, and eventually from 1995 it is legal to produce a Chianti with 100% sangiovese, or at least without the white grapes. However, for a wine to retain the name of Chianti, it must be produced with at least 80% sangiovese grapes. It may have a picture of a black rooster (known in Italian as a gallo nero) on the neck of the bottle, which indicates that the producer of the wine is a member of the "Gallo Nero" Consortium; an association of producers of the Classico sub-area sharing marketing costs[2]. Since 2005 the black rooster is the emblem of the Chianti Classico producers association[3]. Aged Chianti (38 months instead of 4-7), may be labelled as Riserva. Chianti that meets more stringent requirements (lower yield, higher alcohol content and dry extract) may be labelled as Chianti Superiore. Chianti from the "Classico" sub-area is not allowed in any case to be labelled as "Superiore".

txisheaven


quality posts: 0 Private Messages txisheaven
fairnymph wrote:I always do that, don't you know? Was raised that way.

I wish I'd kept notes - this was around the time I got started on CT. But my private consumption notes, based on recall once I entered recently drunk wines in:

2005 Sangiovese: Delicious sangiovese, great value! Would definitely buy again.

2004 Sangiovese Riserva: Divine. One of the best wines I've had in a while.

Not so helpful, I know. But I can tell you that Sangiovese was my first varietal love, albeit Tuscan style. The Riserva is bigger and more structured, more complex, and smoother - I believe it reminded me of Vino Nobile di Montepulciano - but I consider both to be well-styled considering the CA growing conditions. I.e. not overly thin or fruity.



The boyfriend and I had the 2005 Sangio and it was great!

enderrpf


quality posts: 0 Private Messages enderrpf
MarkDaSpark wrote:Not if you want to stay married or in a relationship .... and if married, you chance losing half your wine .....



I like to use a little pseudo code when I'm trying to evaluate my WineBuyingMoritorium status.

bool InWineBuyingMoritorium(int bottlesInCurrentOffering, decimal costOfCurrentOffering)
{
//On a scale of 1-10 (10 being the most) how much relational resistance can you withstand?
const short RelationalResistanceLevel = 7;

if (this.BankBalance < costOfCurrentOffering)
return false;

if (this.RelationshipStatus == RelationshipStatus.Single)
{
return true;
}

if (this.RelationshipStatus == RelationshipStatus.Dating)
{
if (this.ResistanceLevel > RelationalResistanceLevel)
return true;
else if (RelationalResistanceLevel == 10)
return true;
else
return false;

}

if (this.RelationshipStatus == RelationshipStatus.Married)
{
if (this.ResistanceLevel > RelationalResistanceLevel)
return true;
else if (RelationalResistanceLevel == 10 && _
(bottlesInCurrentOffering + this.BottlesInCollection)/2 > this.BottlesInCollection)
//If the status of the relationship doesn't matter.
//Check that buying the wine + a halving of the entire collection
//doesn't result in a net loss of bottles.
return true;
else
return false;

}

}

skout23


quality posts: 0 Private Messages skout23

ha! July 4th 2007, Really hot day. I happened to be at this vineyard, with a small group of friends avoiding the normal 4th of July events. Had a blast with some friends, checking out various vineyards in Amador County. As we were leaving Vino Noceto, we noticed a small open flame on a wood pile dangerously close to a large gas tank. We put out the fire with bucket that was nearby and a water hose. We saved the day. Also loved the wine

Cheers,
Scott

Krugsters


quality posts: 7 Private Messages Krugsters

OK...FINE!

Cesare talked me into this.
In for 2.


HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42
JanaDahlen wrote:I feel so special...I was chosen to labrat the 2006 Sangiovese. I would love to open the bottle, and provide my thoughts, but I'm expecting a little one so that probably wouldn't be the best idea. I'm going to reach out to my sister and see if she can do a tasting on it tonight and have her post up what she thinks.



How far along are you? Though in either case, while having your sister "drink" it for getting what she thinks you can still "taste" it and post your own notes on it. Especially if you simply swish-n-spit, but even a couple small sips would be just fine as well. After all, Europeans and plenty of others still continue to drink small amounts of wine through pregnancies. So as long as you don't consume half the bottle, I'm betting you can still get some good tasting notes out of the labrat bottle.

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

kyle83uw


quality posts: 4 Private Messages kyle83uw
kyle83uw wrote:Well, I didn't get a labrat email, so I assume I'm not one of the lucky few- oh well, guess I'll have to crack my 04 Riserva =)
*snip*





Seems I pulled the cork too early- Fedex just stopped by w/ a bottle of the 2005 Riserva! Just in case this did happen, I saved half of the 2004 that I opened last night, so I should be able to do a side by side (however, the 2004 will have been open 24 hours).
Huge thank you to WD- couldn't be happier to have the vino noceto be my first "official" labratting.
Unfortunitly, I do work odd hours (330-midnight), so the report will be a bit late- I should have it up around 1am pst or so.

JanaDahlen


quality posts: 0 Private Messages JanaDahlen
HitAnyKey42 wrote:How far along are you? Though in either case, while having your sister "drink" it for getting what she thinks you can still "taste" it and post your own notes on it. Especially if you simply swish-n-spit, but even a couple small sips would be just fine as well. After all, Europeans and plenty of others still continue to drink small amounts of wine through pregnancies. So as long as you don't consume half the bottle, I'm betting you can still get some good tasting notes out of the labrat bottle.



This is very true, altough I wasn't going to be the one to say it. (Oh, and I'm at 34 weeks.)

w.w: 19 s.w: 12 w: 4 k.w:2

HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42
JanaDahlen wrote:This is very true, altough I wasn't going to be the one to say it. (Oh, and I'm at 34 weeks.)



Well the thoughts mainly originate from the lovely Krugsters. She has hosted the last few NYC Wine.Woot tastings and she'll be popping out twins in a couple months.
But I would have said it anyway.

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

JimofNoceto


quality posts: 23 Private Messages JimofNoceto

What is Chianti? Jim's Perspective.
Chianti is first a region in Italy roughly between Florence and Sienna going back for at least 700 years, perhaps much more. The Chianti league played an important part in the evolution of the states and city-states that now comprise Italy.
Virtually all farming was feudal, with peasants farming small portions of the rugged, Chianti countryside. They paid substantial chunks of their production to their feudal lord and the church. Most agriculture was promiscuous. That is, fruit, olive, or nut trees first defined the farm. Rows of grapes were planted between the trees. Because of the rough terrain and the fact that farming was by nature done by hand, these "rows" had little in common with our current perception of vineyard rows. Then, grain and, more recently as in post-Columbus, corn were planted between the vines. Further, the grapes were planted primarily to produce calories and alcohol. Five hundred years ago the peasant farmer's concept was survival, not production of "fine" wine from "noble" varieties.
Many varieties could be found in these vineyards, perhaps as many as 100, maybe more. Also, local nomenclature might have its own name for even the common varieties, such as Sangiovese. Still today Sangiovese has at least five different "names" in Central Italy.
In the 1800's Europe had somewhat of a Renaisance or discovery of wine on a broad scale. Perhaps it was the trading and consumption of the Brit's that advanced things past that of the Pope and a few local leaders. In Tuscany that led to the definition of Chianti (and its close cousins Carmignano and Vino Nobile de Montepulciano) and Brunell di Montalcino around the turn of the previous century. Brunello is 100% Sangiovese historically from the Sangiovese Grosso clone from the Montalcino area. Chianti and its cousins were defined as field blends, based primarily as Sangiovese (80-90%), traditional Tuscan whites such as Trebbiano and Malvasia (0-10%), and traditional Tuscan reds including Canaiolo Nero, Mamolo, and Colorino, among others (0-10%). These represented common vine types in the vineyard. Note that because of the vineyard devastation from phyloxera during the last 15 years of the 1800's, many vineyards were already being replanted! This facilitated a perceived upgrading of the grapes and wine.
So, today? Brunello remains 100% Sangiovese, but the rules for aging have been relaxed with a reduction of the time of barrel aging in favor of bottle aging. This is in response to the modern taste toward fruity and bigger wines.
The Chianti formula has evolved significantly in the last 30 years. The whites are excluded from the most current rules. Sangiovese is 80-100%. The remainder can be the traditional Tuscan reds or French Bordeaux varieties or Syrah. At a somewhat slower pace, I understand Carmignano and Vino Nobile have similarly updated their formulas. Cabernet Sauvignon has been a permitted component in Carmignano for a longer than Chianti.
Also, with Chianti, we have a number of appellations, some overlapping, most with their own distinctive characteristics. The "preferred" Chianti Classico region is the old Chianti League area between Florence and Sienna. Another seven appellations loosely surround the area, with typical geographical ties. For example, Chianti colli Senesi is Chianti from the hills around Sienna.
Ah, and with Vino Noceto? Misto is our "traditional" Chianti blend. The new, 2006 vintage of 140 cases is 89% Sangiovese from a Chianti clone on the Hillside block co-fermented with 1% Canaiolo Nero, 3.5% Malvasia, and 6% Trebbiano. The 200 cases of Hillside are 100% Sangiovese from that clone, which can be traced back to Isole e Olena. From the same clonal selection, Reward Ranch is from a neighbor's vineyard less than 1/2 mile away. These three wines usually show as cousins, but rarely as siblings. Dos Oakies, Marmellata, and Noce Knoll can be traced back to the respective Brunello producers Il Pioggione, Biondi Sante, and Altesino. On our estate these three are grown on a 16 acre, contiguous section. It's amazing the divergence of flavors and styles we see.
Enough? Ask. I can spout more until you want me to go away! And, millie grazie for your interest.
Jim

subinsignia


quality posts: 9 Private Messages subinsignia

Keep it up Jim, you are doing a great job!

Steve Jones

jcastagno


quality posts: 1 Private Messages jcastagno

Jim thank you for the extensive background, for me anyway, I find these discussions and historical perspectives as compelling as the "rat" reviews; maybe even more so, for that matter...


oh and in for 2 yesterday...

Lighter


quality posts: 10 Private Messages Lighter

What an education! And it's free! Well, there is that devil WD and his offers . . .

kurtswa


quality posts: 14 Private Messages kurtswa
JimofNoceto wrote:What is Chianti? Jim's Perspective.
Chianti is first a region in Italy roughly between Florence and Sienna going back for at least 700 years, perhaps much more. The Chianti league played an important part in the evolution of the states and city-states that now comprise Italy.
Virtually all farming was feudal, with peasants farming small portions of the rugged, Chianti countryside. They paid substantial chunks of their production to their feudal lord and the church. Most agriculture was promiscuous. That is, fruit, olive, or nut trees first defined the farm. Rows of grapes were planted between the trees. Because of the rough terrain and the fact that farming was by nature done by hand, these "rows" had little in common with our current perception of vineyard rows. Then, grain and, more recently as in post-Columbus, corn were planted between the vines. Further, the grapes were planted primarily to produce calories and alcohol. Five hundred years ago the peasant farmer's concept was survival, not production of "fine" wine from "noble" varieties.
Many varieties could be found in these vineyards, perhaps as many as 100, maybe more. Also, local nomenclature might have its own name for even the common varieties, such as Sangiovese. Still today Sangiovese has at least five different "names" in Central Italy.
In the 1800's Europe had somewhat of a Renaisance or discovery of wine on a broad scale. Perhaps it was the trading and consumption of the Brit's that advanced things past that of the Pope and a few local leaders. In Tuscany that led to the definition of Chianti (and its close cousins Carmignano and Vino Nobile de Montepulciano) and Brunell di Montalcino around the turn of the previous century. Brunello is 100% Sangiovese historically from the Sangiovese Grosso clone from the Montalcino area. Chianti and its cousins were defined as field blends, based primarily as Sangiovese (80-90%), traditional Tuscan whites such as Trebbiano and Malvasia (0-10%), and traditional Tuscan reds including Canaiolo Nero, Mamolo, and Colorino, among others (0-10%). These represented common vine types in the vineyard. Note that because of the vineyard devastation from phyloxera during the last 15 years of the 1800's, many vineyards were already being replanted! This facilitated a perceived upgrading of the grapes and wine.
So, today? Brunello remains 100% Sangiovese, but the rules for aging have been relaxed with a reduction of the time of barrel aging in favor of bottle aging. This is in response to the modern taste toward fruity and bigger wines.
The Chianti formula has evolved significantly in the last 30 years. The whites are excluded from the most current rules. Sangiovese is 80-100%. The remainder can be the traditional Tuscan reds or French Bordeaux varieties or Syrah. At a somewhat slower pace, I understand Carmignano and Vino Nobile have similarly updated their formulas. Cabernet Sauvignon has been a permitted component in Carmignano for a longer than Chianti.
Also, with Chianti, we have a number of appellations, some overlapping, most with their own distinctive characteristics. The "preferred" Chianti Classico region is the old Chianti League area between Florence and Sienna. Another seven appellations loosely surround the area, with typical geographical ties. For example, Chianti colli Senesi is Chianti from the hills around Sienna.
Ah, and with Vino Noceto? Misto is our "traditional" Chianti blend. The new, 2006 vintage of 140 cases is 89% Sangiovese from a Chianti clone on the Hillside block co-fermented with 1% Canaiolo Nero, 3.5% Malvasia, and 6% Trebbiano. The 200 cases of Hillside are 100% Sangiovese from that clone, which can be traced back to Isole e Olena. From the same clonal selection, Reward Ranch is from a neighbor's vineyard less than 1/2 mile away. These three wines usually show as cousins, but rarely as siblings. Dos Oakies, Marmellata, and Noce Knoll can be traced back to the respective Brunello producers Il Pioggione, Biondi Sante, and Altesino. On our estate these three are grown on a 16 acre, contiguous section. It's amazing the divergence of flavors and styles we see.
Enough? Ask. I can spout more until you want me to go away! And, millie grazie for your interest.
Jim




thanks Jim!
I am glad I asked the questions now (not that the other posts didn't also answer my question).

mopsie2002


quality posts: 4 Private Messages mopsie2002
HitAnyKey42 wrote:How far along are you? Though in either case, while having your sister "drink" it for getting what she thinks you can still "taste" it and post your own notes on it. Especially if you simply swish-n-spit, but even a couple small sips would be just fine as well. After all, Europeans and plenty of others still continue to drink small amounts of wine through pregnancies. So as long as you don't consume half the bottle, I'm betting you can still get some good tasting notes out of the labrat bottle.



I *think* you can have a quarter-glass a day, but don't quote me on that, look it up. At any rate, a few sips is fine.

Oregonian through and through <3...even if I call North Carolina my home now.

INTLGerard


quality posts: 58 Private Messages INTLGerard

Guest Blogger

JimofNoceto wrote:Perhaps more than you want to know, but we started this with a research trip to Tuscany in 1985 (with 2 and 4 year old boys). We visited a number of Chianti and Brunello producers: Isola e Olena, Antinori, Castello dei Rampolla, Argiano, and others. We learned many used large format cooperage for aging their Sangiovese wines. Some were beginning to use smaller, 225 liter barrels, often new oak. We found we usually preferred the fruit and lower oakiness of those aged in larger cooperage. Thus, we typically use puncheons with Sangiovese. New 225 liter barrels typically get "broken in" with OGP Zinfandel or Linsteadt Barbera. After a couple vintages, the used barrels find their way into the Sangiovese program. We usually get about 10 vintages from a barrel or puncheon before it becomes a planter or oak chips for the BBQ!
Jim



Interesting that your journey began around the same time that Antinori came to Atlas Peak which some credit with revitalizing interest in producing Sangiovese in California. I’ve read that Antinori reported having a challenging time of it with Sangiovese early on and that many growers still share the sentiment that it requires too much attention in the vineyards. I remember being in Napa in the mid 90’s when it looked as though Sangiovese was starting to come into its own but progress in achieving consistent quality over time has yet to be seen. By all accounts here, it appears you have had very good success with Sangiovese over the years. Maybe you can touch on the early years and any challenges you’ve faced to achieve the level of quality others strive for. The loyal following you have developed here is a testament to that.

HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42

Jim, let me reiterate 10-fold what everyone else has said about your participation this offering. All of you actually. Don’t think we’ve ever had three people from a winery chiming in during the same offering. That Noceto offering in Dec 07 was the very first offering on W.W that I went in for more than 2 sets. And for that one I was originally in for 1 set, then because of the winery participation and high praises from everyone I tried to up it to 3 but the order was already being processed. So I gifted myself another 3, and in actually was in for 4 sets for the first time. I realized I haven’t tried any of the Riserva’s from that offering yet (though I plan to very soon), but I’ve loved every bottle of the regular Sangio I’ve had.
I shouldn’t even have been buying this week as I really have too much wine (Gasp! I know that’s blasphemy! ), but just couldn’t not get any. I’m glad I did so as soon as the offering came out, because if I saw all the stuff you and others have been saying today then I’d surely be going in for 3 and my cellar and wallet can’t handle that right now.

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

mida i


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mida i

I bought the offering 12/07 as my second winewoot purchase and was not keeping tasting notes like I do now. I don't think I liked the Zinfandel much being somewhat hot, the Sang. seemed simple and likely just needed more time in the bottle and my memory is fuzzy on the reserve but I know it was my favorite of the 3.

I remember from a few offerings ago a couple wooters were naming wines they liked and ones not liked and Noceto was on a couple people's not liked list. I can't remember exactly when but if someone remembers this it would be helpful.

Every entry now that there is an offering saying how much they love this stuff just does not match my memory. Please don't hold back a comment because it may not be positive.

Krugsters


quality posts: 7 Private Messages Krugsters
HitAnyKey42 wrote:Well the thoughts mainly originate from the lovely Krugsters. She has hosted the last few NYC Wine.Woot tastings and she'll be popping out twins in a couple months.
But I would have said it anyway.



About a month or so after the twins come out my house is gonna be the place to be.
I am going on such a bender and opening great bottles due to the fact I've had such little wine for so long.

PS-Will trade wine for babysitting.


Cesare


quality posts: 1597 Private Messages Cesare
Krugsters wrote:PS-Will trade wine for babysitting.


But... we all have too much wine already. Maybe you could trade wine *storage* for babysitting, then you would have some takers :P

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

INTLGerard


quality posts: 58 Private Messages INTLGerard

Guest Blogger

Krugsters wrote:About a month or so after the twins come out my house is gonna be the place to be.
I am going on such a bender and opening great bottles due to the fact I've had such little wine for so long.

PS-Will trade babysitting for wine.



Due to the fact that you're having twins that is...wow, you're going to need all the wine you can get! How far off are you? WD is greedily rubbing his hands together. ;-)

animallover


quality posts: 6 Private Messages animallover
txmusicman49 wrote:Jim did you ever consider bagging and selling the chips on Woot as a side deal? I'm sure ?WD would help with shipping costs...



I was wondering the same thing. A whole new revenue stream!

txisheaven


quality posts: 0 Private Messages txisheaven
Krugsters wrote:About a month or so after the twins come out my house is gonna be the place to be.
I am going on such a bender and opening great bottles due to the fact I've had such little wine for so long.

PS-Will trade wine for babysitting.



Congrats on having twins! I'm a twin...our mom had a nervous breakdown a few weeks after having us b/c she had no help. But other than that, she swears that we are the best thing to ever happen to her

Krugsters


quality posts: 7 Private Messages Krugsters
INTLGerard wrote:Due to the fact that you're having twins that is...wow, you're going to need all the wine you can get! How far off are you? WD is greedily rubbing his hands together. ;-)



I am due pretty much the entire month of May since they don't know what to expect during the final weeks.

As long as WD and WF keep me well stocked with milk storage bags for the freezer I'll be their best customer for at least a year.

PS-Will trade wine storage for babysitting.


Krugsters


quality posts: 7 Private Messages Krugsters
txisheaven wrote:our mom had a nervous breakdown a few weeks after having us b/c she had no help.



Clearly illustrates the reason why I'm willing to trip over other people's wine boxes for babysitting.

Are you a fraternal or identical twin?


Krugsters


quality posts: 7 Private Messages Krugsters
txisheaven wrote:our mom had a nervous breakdown a few weeks after having us b/c she had no help.



Clearly illustrates the reason why I'm willing to trip over other people's wine boxes for babysitting.

Are you a fraternal or identical twin?

EDIT: No pun intended with twin discussion but this is a double post.


HitAnyKey42


quality posts: 29 Private Messages HitAnyKey42
Krugsters wrote:PS-Will trade wine storage for babysitting.



I just may take you up on that. My parents keep looking mind-boggling at the stacks of boxes I store in their basement. They just don't understand that....well....WD has me TRAPPED AND I CAN'T ESCAPE!!!

My Cellar
In a Glorious Marriage.Woot with cheron98
NYC Tastings

McMalbec


quality posts: 8 Private Messages McMalbec

Nice sounding offering. Spring is in the air- supposedly going to reach the mid 40s tomorrow!
In for uno.

Neuse101


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Neuse101

In for three.

Neuse202


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Neuse202

And so am I.