Vinroessler


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Vinroessler
jesterg86 wrote:WineDavid, what the koi?

Right after I decide to take the plunge and do my first 2fer, you offer more Pinot Noir.

On a similar note, is there any really good guide to wine tasting for noobs out there? Being just recently 21 I have found this site, and specifically the forums, invaluable. But what I find myself running into is that, while I can tell which wines I like (Pinot Noir, Savignon Blanc, Gewurtzrewhatever) from those I don't (Syrah, cheap Zinfandel, Arbor Mist) I don't really know what tastes I'm tasting. For instance, I can't pick up on the cherries that everyone raves about in the EHP I got (just in time for Christmas). I know the best thing is to try lots of wines, but I is an kollege student. How do I train my palate on a budget?

P.S. If, and only if, I get the extra job at CVS will I go in for 1, and only 1, no matter how infuriatingly eloquent and tempting the winemaker is.



I started my career in the wine industry just out of college, and I often had the same problem. I had parents that would drink wine with dinner and through this trial and error, I started to discover the wines that I liked and didn’t like. It was not till after I was in the industry that I really started to understand the nuances of why I liked certain wines.

This seems rather odd, but one of my bosses at the time suggested that I get one of those big assorted packs of Jelly Bellies. I was like… You can’t be serious. Oddly enough a lot of those candied/baked fruit flavors are some of the flavors associated with wines. So, once you can pick out that that is a cherry jelly bean, now associate that same thought process with wine.

The other tool that I used was the aroma wheel. It starts out in the middle of the circle with very general aromas, but as it gets to the outside the associated aromas become more specific, until you have narrowed it down to the specific aromatic. There are a lot of different versions of this wheel in various wine shops. I have one that I carry around with me in a notebook and appears to be devised from a UC Davis Professor. It even has a common guide to Varietal aromas on the reverse side. I am not exactly sure where I picked it up, but there is a copyright 1990 A.C. Noble and an address AC Noble, Box 72239, Davis, CA 95616-8749… Hope this helps…

Happy Drinking!

gijose


quality posts: 4 Private Messages gijose

I found some wine wheels with a quick google search! what a great idea, I'll give this a shot next time I try wine. It's always hard to pinpoint the flavors. Maybe having them in my face will help.

NYC!

Shapley


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Shapley
Vinroessler wrote:I started my career in the wine industry just out of college, and I often had the same problem. I had parents that would drink wine with dinner and through this trial and error, I started to discover the wines that I liked and didn’t like. It was not till after I was in the industry that I really started to understand the nuances of why I liked certain wines.

This seems rather odd, but one of my bosses at the time suggested that I get one of those big assorted packs of Jelly Bellies. I was like… You can’t be serious. Oddly enough a lot of those candied/baked fruit flavors are some of the flavors associated with wines. So, once you can pick out that that is a cherry jelly bean, now associate that same thought process with wine.

The other tool that I used was the aroma wheel. It starts out in the middle of the circle with very general aromas, but as it gets to the outside the associated aromas become more specific, until you have narrowed it down to the specific aromatic. There are a lot of different versions of this wheel in various wine shops. I have one that I carry around with me in a notebook and appears to be devised from a UC Davis Professor. It even has a common guide to Varietal aromas on the reverse side. I am not exactly sure where I picked it up, but there is a copyright 1990 A.C. Noble and an address AC Noble, Box 72239, Davis, CA 95616-8749… Hope this helps…

Happy Drinking!



bkarney


quality posts: 5 Private Messages bkarney
Vinroessler wrote:I have one that I carry around with me in a notebook and appears to be devised from a UC Davis Professor. It even has a common guide to Varietal aromas on the reverse side. I am not exactly sure where I picked it up, but there is a copyright 1990 A.C. Noble and an address AC Noble, Box 72239, Davis, CA 95616-8749… Hope this helps…

Happy Drinking!



Is this the one you have?



Found Here

CT

vwsmaltz


quality posts: 0 Private Messages vwsmaltz

No WV again - but it's on the winery ship to list.. what gives?

VWS

Shapley


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Shapley
Shapley wrote:



Oops, I hit post too soon. Sorry to reply to someone else from the Winery, but I think you've hit on a brilliant idea - Jelly Belly Wine Wheel! Less expensive than a semell kit, and more fun to eat! (You could probably even get the Cat pee, musk, and truffle flavors from the Bertie Bott's series...) You may even be able to create just the right combined handful to allow the under-aged to legally experience a bit of Savoy or Encantada...

If I had an entreprenurial bone in my body, I'd do it myself, but if anyone else gets the sphere rolling, I'll buy some for Holiday gifts!

Great Idea!

Scott

Vinroessler


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Vinroessler
bkarney wrote:Is this the one you have?



Found Here



Ah... Yes, that is the one!

Loweeel


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Loweeel
fairnymph wrote:Hee! Does DC not light up? Do you reside in VA, but work in DC?



DC doesn't light up on woot, oddly enough. But yeah, that's the current arrangement.

Favorites: Roessler ¬ KRPN ¬ Etude ¬ Stuart ¬ KRPort ¬ Tøøthstejnn ¬ Titus ¬ URSA ¬ InZin ¬ SBMystery ¬ SxBS&Z+4 ¬ DC3&4 ¬ TyC3&FB ¬ FeEquus ¬ PSPS ¬ Harvey ¬ SBRes&CR ¬ Corison ¬ Noceto ¬ Humbug ¬ KRSEXY3SOME ¬ PoiZin06 ¬ POLY ¬ Castoro ¬ SBCab ¬ KRPS2K ¬ HW12 ¬ GSaké ¬ הגפןCab ¬ PepBr

CT ¬ PSychos' Path
"The one difference between me and Petite Sirah is that I don't have a dumb period." - YT

Vinroessler


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Vinroessler
Vinroessler wrote:Ah... Yes, that is the one!



And what a deal... All the use I have gotten out of that wheel and for only $5... Maybe Winedavid can get it in a woot package one of these weeks!

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
Winedavid39 wrote:RPM, you have a private message.



so that's how it's going to be then?!? :P

EDIT: my dearest, dearest rpm, i look forward to your full Davis (modified) notes. as well as to those of your companions. especially that hack speedoo!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

Winedavid39


quality posts: 204 Private Messages Winedavid39

Guest Blogger

themostrighteous wrote:so that's how it's going to be then?!? :P

EDIT: my dearest, dearest rpm, i look forward to your full Davis (modified) notes. as well as to those of your companions. especially that hack speedoo!



you have a PM too (chill..)

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu

Savoy vineyards is goooooooooooood. Probably my 2nd favorite Pinot Vineyard in CA.

Shapley


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Shapley
clayfu wrote:Savoy vineyards is goooooooooooood. Probably my 2nd favorite Pinot Vineyard in CA.



It really is an amazing vineyard, and Rich Savoy is a great grower to work with. It is a complicated vineyard with all of the various lots we pick from there, and it make Harvest logistics more complicated in the cellar, but it's all worth it.

Scott

noahhock


quality posts: 0 Private Messages noahhock
clayfu wrote:Savoy vineyards is goooooooooooood. Probably my 2nd favorite Pinot Vineyard in CA.



This may be slightly off topic but I have to ask. Which is your favorite?

My meager cellar

Wines Wooted: Etude Fortitude, Willamette Valley Vineyards PN, TyC 2005 Field Blend, Roessler PN Trio

Shapley


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Shapley

I've been remembering earlier questions I never got to...

The 2006 Encantada was a 300 case production.

Sorry for the delay on that one.

Scott

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
Winedavid39 wrote:you have a PM too (chill..)



i be most chill - want to compare your weather to mine? - and you haz PM response.

do you know... what biodynamics is?

labROUS


quality posts: 7 Private Messages labROUS

It has been a while since the last time I reviewed a wine here, so it's probably a good idea to remind folks that LabROUS is another username for SonomaBouliste / Peter Wellington. As LabROUS I am attempting to make my reviews as descriptive as possible, but non-judgmental. If I have been at all successful in this regard I will have given you some idea of what to expect, but have not let my preferences color the reviews. I obviously let the cat out of the bag a bit earlier in the week when I w00ted and expressed my admiration for Roessler wines (which might be one of the reasons WineDavid was generous enough to let me have both of these wines to review). There are a few wineries / winemakers that I hold in high esteem and can recommend unequivocally (eg Corison, Titus), but I haven't reviewed any of their wines here before.

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to taste these alongside any of the Roessler appellation series wines (from the previous w00t offering), so I can only compare and contrast these two with each other. My staff, including associate winemaker David Noyes (a budding Pinot Noir star in his own right), tasted along with me, and I have incorporated some of their comments in the following descriptions.

Roessler 2006 Pinot Noir, La Encantada
Significantly darker than the Savoy. Unmistakable Pinot Noir aromas. If someone asked what Pinot Noir smells like, this is it: strawberry and cherry, forest floor, old rose petal, mushroom/truffle. There are hints of cola, orange peel, herbs, smoked meat, tar and chocolate. This wine has medium body, good acid balance, and the flavors mirror the aromas. The oak is very well integrated, never obvious , much less dominant, either in the aromas or on the palate. Although this wine is young, it is already developing the rich yet airy texture that is one of the qualities that set Pinot apart. The best way I can describe it is to use the analogy of chocolate mousse – rich but seemingly almost weightless. The aromas, flavor and texture were very similar after several hours.

Roessler 2006 Pinot Noir, Savoy
Medium garnet. The aromas are very complex,strawberry and raspberry, plum, sage, vanilla, fresh loam, smoke, black pepper, truffle, cedar, Asian spice, and maybe a slight hint of stemminess (is that a word?). This wine is a little leaner than the Encantada, but has moderately concentrated raspberry-like fruit. It seems to have slightly brighter acid, a little more oak and is more tannic. I think this wine has all of its elements in balance, but they aren't fully integrated yet. It has pretty good length already, but shows promise of significant development with more bottle age. The fruit (cherry-plum) aromas were more intense after several hours and there was still a lot of the smoky, slightly gamy character along with a brushy, sage-like aspect.

The La Encantada is more forward and seemingly more evolved. My wife, who prefers Rhône whites and lighter style Zins and Pinots, had a strong preference for this over the Savoy. It could be sipped by itself or accompanied by a smoked Gouda, whereas the Savoy would be better enjoyed with a hearty meal.. Staff suggestions included shepherd's pie and baked yams.

Because Pinot Noir often surprises in terms of longevity, I can't say for sure whether the Savoy will outlast the La Encantada. I do believe that it will develop more and benefit more from extended aging, so if I were going to lay only one of these down it would definitely be the Savoy.

Finally, as a general note, these are traditionally styled, sophisticated wines of substance and nuance. They may not appeal all that much to the folks who prefer big, rich, concentrated “Parker style” wines.


clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu
noahhock wrote:This may be slightly off topic but I have to ask. Which is your favorite?



marcassin vineyard (sonoma coast)... not exactly the most accessible vineyard but really the best CA pinot I've ever had .. consistently.

Josh784


quality posts: 1 Private Messages Josh784

Logged on to wine.woot last night intending to hand over my Visa, so to speak, for the Roessler trio, only to find this instead. Couldn't pass it up - always in for some quality PN!

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
labROUS wrote:It has been a while since the last time I reviewed a wine here, so it's probably a good idea to remind folks that LabROUS is another username for SonomaBouliste / Peter Wellington.

[REDUNKULOUS RATTAGE THAT HAS ME FOAMING AT THE MOUTH FOR MORE!]



WD, don't bother sending me a rat bottle: what else does anyone need to know other than THIS?!?

awesome (as always) Peter.

EDIT: WD, just kidding, of course!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

rpm


quality posts: 174 Private Messages rpm
labROUS wrote:It has been a while since the last time I reviewed a wine here, so it's probably a good idea to remind folks that LabROUS is another username for SonomaBouliste / Peter Wellington. As LabROUS I am attempting to make my reviews as descriptive as possible, but non-judgmental. If I have been at all successful in this regard I will have given you some idea of what to expect, but have not let my preferences color the reviews. I obviously let the cat out of the bag a bit earlier in the week when I w00ted and expressed my admiration for Roessler wines (which might be one of the reasons WineDavid was generous enough to let me have both of these wines to review). There are a few wineries / winemakers that I hold in high esteem and can recommend unequivocally (eg Corison, Titus), but I haven't reviewed any of their wines here before.

Unfortunately, I wasn't able to taste these alongside any of the Roessler appellation series wines (from the previous w00t offering), so I can only compare and contrast these two with each other. My staff, including associate winemaker David Noyes (a budding Pinot Noir star in his own right), tasted along with me, and I have incorporated some of their comments in the following descriptions.

Roessler 2006 Pinot Noir, La Encantada
Significantly darker than the Savoy. Unmistakable Pinot Noir aromas. If someone asked what Pinot Noir smells like, this is it: strawberry and cherry, forest floor, old rose petal, mushroom/truffle. There are hints of cola, orange peel, herbs, smoked meat, tar and chocolate. This wine has medium body, good acid balance, and the flavors mirror the aromas. The oak is very well integrated, never obvious , much less dominant, either in the aromas or on the palate. Although this wine is young, it is already developing the rich yet airy texture that is one of the qualities that set Pinot apart. The best way I can describe it is to use the analogy of chocolate mousse – rich but seemingly almost weightless. The aromas, flavor and texture were very similar after several hours.

Roessler 2006 Pinot Noir, Savoy
Medium garnet. The aromas are very complex,strawberry and raspberry, plum, sage, vanilla, fresh loam, smoke, black pepper, truffle, cedar, Asian spice, and maybe a slight hint of stemminess (is that a word?). This wine is a little leaner than the Encantada, but has moderately concentrated raspberry-like fruit. It seems to have slightly brighter acid, a little more oak and is more tannic. I think this wine has all of its elements in balance, but they aren't fully integrated yet. It has pretty good length already, but shows promise of significant development with more bottle age. The fruit (cherry-plum) aromas were more intense after several hours and there was still a lot of the smoky, slightly gamy character along with a brushy, sage-like aspect.

The La Encantada is more forward and seemingly more evolved. My wife, who prefers Rhône whites and lighter style Zins and Pinots, had a strong preference for this over the Savoy. It could be sipped by itself or accompanied by a smoked Gouda, whereas the Savoy would be better enjoyed with a hearty meal.. Staff suggestions included shepherd's pie and baked yams.

Because Pinot Noir often surprises in terms of longevity, I can't say for sure whether the Savoy will outlast the La Encantada. I do believe that it will develop more and benefit more from extended aging, so if I were going to lay only one of these down it would definitely be the Savoy.

Finally, as a general note, these are traditionally styled, sophisticated wines of substance and nuance. They may not appeal all that much to the folks who prefer big, rich, concentrated “Parker style” wines.



Very nice descriptions, Peter. You certainly show an attempt to be as objective as possible, but I suspect these are wines you will try to lay down a few bottles of.

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

jwink


quality posts: 39 Private Messages jwink
rpm wrote:Good idea!

WD -- HOW ABOUT A LABRATTY TO THE NYC TASTING CREW THIS SATURDAY!!! Combine that with the CHICAGO CREW and we'll have some serious notes AND some really serious good community building -- an encouragement to folks to woot.up together!



Can you provide a link to the full Davis tasting notes criteria?

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themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
jwink wrote:Can you provide a link to the full Davis tasting notes criteria?



ditto.

EDIT: gotta love google: if you search for 'full davis modified wine notes', the first entry is currently rpm's original post from earlier today!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98
labROUS wrote:< snip ridiculous rattery >



I was doing so well not reading that while packing it, but then my eyes caught "chocolate mousse" and I was like "Whaaaa?"

Man, oh, man.

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

jwink


quality posts: 39 Private Messages jwink

WD you are PURE EVIL, somehow you knew this would be a harder sell at $30/bottle so what do you deploy as countermeasures? That's right you send SB a bottle of each so he can rat on it today.....devious, simply devious.

For all of you whose SWMBO don't like it, give them the email address that WD has in in signature to complain accordingly :P

So when will be the first news article interviewing a wooter about their home foreclosue appear: "We were doing ok until I found this woot.wine site, and well, we just drank ourselves into homelessness, but it was SO worth it and our palates thank us for it!"

Pure genius WD, next time title the description as "Check Mate".

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Blooging away

labROUS


quality posts: 7 Private Messages labROUS
themostrighteous wrote:ditto.

EDIT: gotta love google: if you search for 'full davis modified wine notes', the first entry is currently rpm's original post from earlier today!




The Davis system is a bit dated in that it was developed so long ago that a lot of the points deal with wine defects that are not very common any more. These days, very few wines would lose points for color, acetic acid (vinegar), cloudiness or bitterness. A modernized scale should probably eliminate some categories and replace them with some categories that were irrelevant back then, such as alcohol (heat) and oak.
Still, assigning numbers to aroma and flavor is very subjective at best, and I think most of you know I believe the 100 point system is pure bullfeathers. I favor a five point system: undrinkable, noticeably flawed but drinkable, average, above average, exceptional. Beyond that it comes down to personal preference more than anything else.

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
labROUS wrote:The Davis system is a bit dated in that it was developed so long ago that a lot of the points deal with wine defects that are not very common any more. These days, very few wines would lose points for color, acetic acid (vinegar), cloudiness or bitterness. A modernized scale should probably eliminate some categories and replace them with some categories that were irrelevant back then, such as alcohol (heat) and oak.
Still, assigning numbers to aroma and flavor is very subjective at best, and I think most of you know I believe the 100 point system is pure bullfeathers. I favor a five point system: undrinkable, noticeably flawed but drinkable, average, above average, exceptional. Beyond that it comes down to personal preference more than anything else.



that's good enough for me! :D

do you know... what biodynamics is?

jwink


quality posts: 39 Private Messages jwink
labROUS wrote:The Davis system is a bit dated in that it was developed so long ago that a lot of the points deal with wine defects that are not very common any more. These days, very few wines would lose points for color, acetic acid (vinegar), cloudiness or bitterness. A modernized scale should probably eliminate some categories and replace them with some categories that were irrelevant back then, such as alcohol (heat) and oak.
Still, assigning numbers to aroma and flavor is very subjective at best, and I think most of you know I believe the 100 point system is pure bullfeathers. I favor a five point system: undrinkable, noticeably flawed but drinkable, average, above average, exceptional. Beyond that it comes down to personal preference more than anything else.



Thanks great feedback, I did find this via google to help tasters somewhat: http://www.americanwinesociety.org/web/downloads/Wine%20Evaluation%20Chart.pdf

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komtstate


quality posts: 0 Private Messages komtstate

I just got my first order from wine.woot today in the mail. It was the Wellington Port Trio from the first of the year.
So, which one should I drink first? I am thinking about starting with the 2005 and working my way to the 2003.

~KO

labROUS


quality posts: 7 Private Messages labROUS
komtstate wrote:I just got my first order from wine.woot today in the mail. It was the Wellington Port Trio from the first of the year.
So, which one should I drink first? I am thinking about starting with the 2005 and working my way to the 2003.




'05 or '03. Save the '04 for last.

bkarney


quality posts: 5 Private Messages bkarney
labROUS wrote:'05 or '03. Save the '04 for last.



yeah nevermind, you're quick!

SonomaBouliste wrote:Our first port, 1992, is still highly enjoyable. As port ages, it loses fruit (like any wine), but gains secondary aromas like toffee, dried fruit, orange peel, caramel....The high residual sugar and alcohol combine to prevent the wine from "drying out" like table wines. Having said that, the 2003 is great right now, the 2004 is still kind of tight, the 2005 more fresh and fruity. I think the 2004 is the one that will benefit most from age and will ultimately be the best of the trio.


CT

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
gcdyersb wrote:Melville Winery has a page on the various clones they grow, but it does seem to have some more general descriptions: http://www.melvillewinery.com/clones.html



mmmmmmmm Melville... just got their mailing on the pre-release for their small-lot 2007 wines. Looks like I'm suddenly going to have a very full quiver of Pinot Noir arrows.

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

komtstate


quality posts: 0 Private Messages komtstate
bkarney wrote:



thanks!

~KO

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
labROUS wrote:It has been a while since the last time I reviewed a wine here, so it's probably a good idea to remind folks that LabROUS is another username for SonomaBouliste / Peter Wellington.



So to paraphrase my friend J-Dub... Peter... I know you THINK you're helping... but seriously... j/k! Thanks for the extensive and thoughtful review... now I only have to hold out until Monday for upping my order.

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
jwink wrote:Thanks great feedback, I did find this via google to help tasters somewhat: http://www.americanwinesociety.org/web/downloads/Wine%20Evaluation%20Chart.pdf



thanks!

EDIT: funny that: upon closer inspection of my rpm tour binder, i realized that i already have a printed copy of this!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

spdrcr05


quality posts: 30 Private Messages spdrcr05
labROUS wrote:'05 or '03. Save the '04 for last.



I agree... although I was amazed at how much more developed the '03 seemed right now when tasted side by side with the other 2.

In periods of profound change, the most dangerous thing is to incrementalize yourself into the future -- Thomas Edision

thecar761


quality posts: 1 Private Messages thecar761
vwsmaltz wrote:No WV again - but it's on the winery ship to list.. what gives?

VWS



the winery has updated (corrected) their website to accurately show the states for which they have licenses. i believe WV is no longer listed. i had a similar problem (nebraska) and will be attempting my first wootleggging trip to iowa. good luck.

Shapley


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Shapley
labROUS wrote:
Finally, as a general note, these are traditionally styled, sophisticated wines of substance and nuance. They may not appeal all that much to the folks who prefer big, rich, concentrated “Parker style” wines.



Great descriptions of the wines, and thanks to you and your Labratting cohorts on this round. You did a great job of pure, neutral description (although I liked the sound of the description, so now maybe I'm biased).

2006 was a leaner-bodied year across the board for us, and while there were a lot of folks panning the vintage early on, I've actually been very pleased with the results in our wines and others. The 2004s and 2005s were nice, too, but I think they didn't have quite the elegance that 2006 was able to provide.

Ah, viva la difference in vintages - one more fun thing to compare and contrast.

Scott

sherrileg


quality posts: 0 Private Messages sherrileg

Sigh. The wines really go quite fast in my house, as I am always having a crowd over for movie nights or game nights. I can't stand the thought of this wine going as fast as the others, so since there are only two, I have decided that I'm in for 3 this time... for the first time ever!

Just couldn't let this one slip past me.

I have started to trust woot way to much when it comes to wines I like.

(But I am winning my boyfriend over, since at first he thought he was better at picking out wines than me, and now he is loving all my woot wines more than his own picks).

Thanks woot!

You won't wake up. You're not dreaming. This is all real.

davirom


quality posts: 10 Private Messages davirom

For you Jelly Belly winos, the marketers are ahead of you. Google came up with 400,000 hits, this one showed up early.

http://www.jellybeanwinebar.com/

edit: URL corrected.