eric9tx


quality posts: 8 Private Messages eric9tx

1. PN
2. Awesome winery participation
3. Peter's "no-brainer" comment
4. Got my Woot-birthday coupon

Now the question is 1 or 2?

Winery question: I enjoy most PNs, but prefer "earthy" over "fruity" (sorry if those are over-simplified terms. I'm not very bright, but I can lift heavy things). Would you consider any of these to be of the funky, mushroom growing out of a rotting log variety? (and I mean that in a good way)

Apologies in advance if this was covered, but I read/skimmed as much as possible.

edit: the really odd thing is... I can't stand eating mushrooms.

213 wooted bottles

I saw this wino, he was eating grapes. I was like, "Dude, you have to wait." - Mitch Hedberg

last wine.woots: S.Harvey Trio x2, Krupp, TyC, Wellington Zin vert, Twisted trio, WootCellars Triacipedis x2, Helix, Madison, InZin trio x2, Wellington Victory, (aw crap... I need to update this)
CT

gcdyersb


quality posts: 141 Private Messages gcdyersb
SonomaBouliste wrote:Color intensity and color hue are separate.



Ah, got it. I was thinking bluer vs. redder being potentially more misleading than darker vs. lighter. So in terms of color hue. Intensity I would associate more with concentration; low intensity wine would be "watered down" in some sense.

Cabernet Franc: it's not just for blending! It's also for blogging.

woopdedoo


quality posts: 36 Private Messages woopdedoo
nmachen wrote:

The Mrs. and I are probably going to be in San Diego in a few weeks. Can the well traveled, well spoken, intelligent, above average wine.wooters give any suggestions for wineries in the area to visit?



You might check out the Woot Wineries Map in my signature below, for the woot wineries in the SD/Temecula area.

Cheers!

kylemittskus


quality posts: 233 Private Messages kylemittskus
ddeuddeg wrote:Kyle offers a good suggestion, but you can save some time by going here, for an existing thread on that topic.



What he said.

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 35 Private Messages ddeuddeg
woopdedoo wrote:You might check out the Woot Wineries Map in my signature below, for the woot wineries in the SD/Temecula area.

Cheers!



Unfortunately, Stuart Cellars is the only one south of LA.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 35 Private Messages ddeuddeg
kylemittskus wrote:What he said.



Still, sending people over to the community is an excellent idea; there's so much over there that I missed out on for quite a while by reading only the main thread on the current offering.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

ERMD


quality posts: 1 Private Messages ERMD
pnotpdcr wrote:The Roessler folks in Sarasota are some kinda distant relatives. I've visited with them there and they do have a few of the wines on the list. Really nice people...
We've been with Southern for 5 or 6 years and its a marriage with some ups and downs. I had dinner with the head of Miami on premise last night (Restaurants) and they're doing a very nice job for us there. You'd find the wine on the lists of many of the local spots. We're going to be doing a tasting of 6 or 7 of the wines at Sunset Corners on Feb 21st. Join us if you're in the area! Also pouring for the Best of the Best event at the Southbeach Food and Wine Fest that weekend.


We need a south/central fla woot gathering!

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 240 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
nematic wrote:Also, don't different MP's have different odor characteristics? I vaguely recall (it was discussed in a bar late at night) that 1-3 MP's are more bell pepper, while 2-4 (0r 3-5?) methoxypyrazine is . . . something else.



I don't know which are which, but you are correct that there are different mp's and they have different aromas. I believe asparagus flavor is dominated by an mp as well.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 233 Private Messages kylemittskus
SonomaBouliste wrote:I don't know which are which, but you are correct that there are different mp's and they have different aromas. I believe asparagus flavor is dominated by an mp as well.



MPs?

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

nematic


quality posts: 6 Private Messages nematic
kylemittskus wrote:MPs?



methoxypyrazines

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methoxypyrazines

nematic


quality posts: 6 Private Messages nematic
nematic wrote:methoxypyrazines

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methoxypyrazines



While I suspect that members of parliament also have distinct odors, they are probably not responsible for many of the aromas in wine

Edit: I is no good at this internet thing - off to read lolcats

Shapley


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Shapley
gcdyersb wrote:Ah, got it. I was thinking bluer vs. redder being potentially more misleading than darker vs. lighter. So in terms of color hue. Intensity I would associate more with concentration; low intensity wine would be "watered down" in some sense.



Wow, it looks like I missed out on all the fun with pH color shift. Great answers from Chemists and Winemakers. All I can add is my aggreement with what everyone else has said: as the pH goes down, wine gets redder and as pH up the wine gets bluer/more purple, although many Pinots do tend to the more brown/orange range rather than the blues (although some Pinots I worked with with a lot of concentrated color have appeared more purple at higher pH.) My best examples on the extreme ends are:

1) When you add a bunch of granular tartaric acid to a small bucket of wine, the very high concentration of acid (and very low local pH) turns it all brilliant red/pink (and it is VERY tart if you ever make the mistake of trying to taste it). If you accidentally add a yeast nutrient that contains ammonia - a potent base to the bucket of wine, you can immediately see your mistake in that the wine turns bluish black.

2) In a fun accidental experiment at an earlier winery, we over deacidified an over acidified topping tank, and ended up with 20 gallons of Pinot at pH 5.2! It was very black looking, felt very slippery on the palate, and flabby was a gross understatement of the overall mouthfeel (why do I always insist on tasting these things?). It also tasted almost nothing like wine as we know it. A pretty interesting but very biZzare tasting experience.

Scott

Shapley


quality posts: 19 Private Messages Shapley
eric9tx wrote:1. PN
2. Awesome winery participation
3. Peter's "no-brainer" comment
4. Got my Woot-birthday coupon

Now the question is 1 or 2?

Winery question: I enjoy most PNs, but prefer "earthy" over "fruity" (sorry if those are over-simplified terms. I'm not very bright, but I can lift heavy things). Would you consider any of these to be of the funky, mushroom growing out of a rotting log variety? (and I mean that in a good way)


Apologies in advance if this was covered, but I read/skimmed as much as possible.

edit: the really odd thing is... I can't stand eating mushrooms.



I would say that you get a range in these wines of funky, earthy elements and fruit. I'd say that the La Brisa gets more at the forest floor along with fruit and can get some of those mushroomy qualities, while the Peregrine gets more into the herbal, sagey character, with more olives than mushrooms accompanying the fruit. Red Label is often one of our more fruit forward wines, but it's no slouch on earthy components either. Our Anderson Valley wines (not represented in this trio) often express a great mushroom flavors and aromas, but they do show up in the Sonoma Coast wines at different times as they open up, and to a greater extent in some vintages than in others.

It will be great to hear which one ends up meeting your "earthy" criteria best!

Scott

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous

diss ezz teh awesomer! geekiest wooter-winery exchanges EVER!! we be wine nerds through & through!!!

EDIT: so what ever happened to those 'brats???

do you know... what biodynamics is?

kylemittskus


quality posts: 233 Private Messages kylemittskus
themostrighteous wrote:diss ezz teh awesomer! geekiest wooter-winery exchanges EVER!! we be wine nerds through & through!!!

EDIT: so what ever happened to those 'brats???



I was just going to ask:

WD: should we be expecting rats?

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

mtuhuskies


quality posts: 0 Private Messages mtuhuskies

In for 1, really enjoying the conversation and recommendations for this wine.


Just trying to make the state of Minnesota a little brighter!

gcdyersb


quality posts: 141 Private Messages gcdyersb
kylemittskus wrote:I was just going to ask:

WD: should we be expecting rats?



If I was one of the lucky ones, it would have gone to my GF's office. She left early today with a virus. It is possible, however unlikely, that a rat bottle could have arrived after she went home.

If that's the case, there's the alibi. And the situation would be handled expediently tomorrow . . . .

Cabernet Franc: it's not just for blending! It's also for blogging.

winefarm


quality posts: 7 Private Messages winefarm

4 rats this go around (doubled up on La Brisa).

kolen


quality posts: 1 Private Messages kolen
winefarm wrote:4 rats this go around (doubled up on La Brisa).



I just opened the La Brisa. (Thank you!) Will submit my report soon...

richc7


quality posts: 4 Private Messages richc7
winefarm wrote:4 rats this go around (doubled up on La Brisa).



This seems like an ominous sign... usually somebody will at least chime in saying they got a package...

EDIT: nvm

pnotpdcr


quality posts: 22 Private Messages pnotpdcr
gcdyersb wrote:I really wasn't interested in Pinot until recently because most of it is just too expensive. Then I found a decent fruit forward $12 offering (McManis) and an elegant, nicely balanced $25 version (Lafond SRH). It's the ones that smell like cloves, sage, mint, herbs and/or kitchen spices that really pull me in now. I have high hopes for the 2006 Peregrine SRH from Roessler since I get those qualities from the Santa Rita Hill Pinot I've liked.


The Lafond Vineyard is really close to the Sanford and Encantada locations. If you liked their wine, I'll be anxious to see what you think of the Peregrine.

sessha


quality posts: 1 Private Messages sessha

Labrat report:

I'm excited to report on my first Labrat experience for the 2006 Peregrine Santa Rita Hills Pinot Noir.

This turned out to be quite the day with the long-awaited inauguration here at last. This proved an appropriate toast to our newly elected president.

I had two compatriots join in the tasting:





Note that I have deliberately omitted myself due to the photogenic superiority of my friends.

Anyhow, to cut to the chase: we all found the wine to be delicious. I recommend it without reservation for anyone who enjoys pinot and am looking forward to trying the other two in the trio. Overall, it compares favorably to the 06 Sea Smoke Southing (also from Sta. Rita) that I had recently. While perhaps lacking some of the complexity of the Southing, it was no less delicious.

Color was pretty typical for a pinot-- nice and light-- passed the finger test (i.e. can see fingers through the glass).

Nose was very pronounced with notes of leather, pepper, strawberry, some earthiness. I sat and just enjoyed the nose on this for quite a while.

Mouthfeel was nice. Very good flavor profile, nice mid-palate and finish. Not quite as over the top as the Southing but very nice fruit and very approachable-- it didn't take us long to finish the bottle.

Overall, would recommend the trio highly based on the Santa Rita.

And thanks to the Woot powers-that-be for labratting me!


eric9tx


quality posts: 8 Private Messages eric9tx
Shapley wrote:I would say that you get a range in these wines of funky, earthy elements and fruit. I'd say that the La Brisa gets more at the forest floor along with fruit and can get some of those mushroomy qualities, while the Peregrine gets more into the herbal, sagey character, with more olives than mushrooms accompanying the fruit. Red Label is often one of our more fruit forward wines, but it's no slouch on earthy components either. Our Anderson Valley wines (not represented in this trio) often express a great mushroom flavors and aromas, but they do show up in the Sonoma Coast wines at different times as they open up, and to a greater extent in some vintages than in others.

It will be great to hear which one ends up meeting your "earthy" criteria best!

Scott



Thanks. Unfortunately, what I got out of your post was "it would be a shame to have only one of each bottle."

*sigh* In for 2.

Last wooter to woot: eric9tx

213 wooted bottles

I saw this wino, he was eating grapes. I was like, "Dude, you have to wait." - Mitch Hedberg

last wine.woots: S.Harvey Trio x2, Krupp, TyC, Wellington Zin vert, Twisted trio, WootCellars Triacipedis x2, Helix, Madison, InZin trio x2, Wellington Victory, (aw crap... I need to update this)
CT

CinnamonRuth


quality posts: 1 Private Messages CinnamonRuth

For those who are interested… I have been enjoying our local restaurant week with a friend and happened to see the Roessler Red Label Pinot on the wine list during our most recent venture. I convinced him we had to get it, thanks to its recent Woot status. The wine was surprisingly full-bodied for a pinot yet it was flirty enough to pair perfectly with each of our dishes, which certainly ran the gamut: pear ravioli, baked brie and raspberry salad with balsamic vinaigrette, pan-roasted salmon (Dan Heim is right!) with spinach and pesto mashed potatoes and filet mignon with gorgonzola and a red wine reduction and grilled asparagus. A chocolate lava cake to finish. It stood up to the filet no problem. Amazing wine – my friend was impressed. I have to go in on this trio to honor the overall adventure. But I would have no problem drinking the wine on its own either.

kolen


quality posts: 1 Private Messages kolen

Lab rat report for the La Brisa:

I’m not sure how to begin. The enclosed So… you’re a lab rat brochure suggests including an anecdote about the FedEx delivery truck, or perhaps a paragraph about the privilege and excitement of being Chosen, but that’s not really my style. I’ll fast forward to the wine.

I like the label. Classy but contemporary. More wineries should realize that packaging is part of the experience. It seems like there’s nothing on the shelves between look-at-me and boring.

I popped the cork and reluctantly poured a glass for my wife. I tried to argue that the lab rat rules prohibit sharing the wine with others, but she already read the brochure.

I opened the bottle around 9pm, so we drank it sans food. I bet it would be great with a mushroom risotto, but it stood well on its own (at some point I nibbled on a square of Scharffen Berger extra dark… not the best combination).

First impression: Cherry with a little barnyard mustiness. Not bashful. My kind of wine. I would guess the grapes came from Carneros, not the Sonoma Coast. It drank well without decanting. It seemed like a nice sitting-in-front-of-the-fireplace wine. The fruit faded to subtle hints of black tea and sage. Also paired well with the Fleet Foxes (yes I just heard them for the first time on SNL and yes, I know you have been listening to them for the past six months).

One caveat: I have an eccentric palate. I like complex in-your-face wines. I like Parkerized 93-point wines. My wife is the opposite. She likes balanced and smooth tannins. We both liked the La Brisa, so I think it might have universal appeal.

Bottom line: At this price point, the La Brisa represents a ridiculous QPR. If possible, please up my order to three. And a sincere thank you WineDavid. People should trust you by now. How silly we still have to do this little lab rat dance. But glad I could do my part.

gcdyersb


quality posts: 141 Private Messages gcdyersb
pnotpdcr wrote:The Lafond Vineyard is really close to the Sanford and Encantada locations. If you liked their wine, I'll be anxious to see what you think of the Peregrine.



I have a feeling that I'll tuck the 2006 Peregrine away for a bit. The pH and ABV are almost identical to the Lafond 2006 SRH, incidentally.

Cabernet Franc: it's not just for blending! It's also for blogging.

tenuki


quality posts: 7 Private Messages tenuki

So not sure why I didn't wonder about it until this offering, but what exactly does barrel aging do? Why PN for 9 mos. and Cab for a year and a half? Partly to impart oak, but then people switch to neutral. How many months does it take to impart oak? If it's just for aging and to let the wine progress, why take it out at all (economic reasons aside)? How do you tell when to take it out of the barrels, is it just when the tannins have softened enough so it's drinkable? Thanks,

CT

gijose


quality posts: 5 Private Messages gijose

so i told my girlfriend that i wasn't going to get this wine...

so now i won't tell her i picked it up...

NYC!

kingsleyr


quality posts: 1 Private Messages kingsleyr
LurkerDan wrote:I saw this comment from an entirely unrelated -- not wine related -- board I frequent. The guy who posted it is in the wine biz, but that's all I know.



For what that is worth.



change for a nickel?

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 35 Private Messages ddeuddeg
kolen wrote: If possible, please up my order to three.



If you haven't already done so, you'll want to email this request to service@woot.com.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

jgiannon


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jgiannon
ddeuddeg wrote:If you haven't already done so, you'll want to email this request to service@woot.com.



I tried that, the day after I ordered (original order was placed at noon on Monday) it was too late, order was sent to the winery already. I wasn't going to order more but after reading the labrat reports I am in for another even with the extra 5 bucks shipping, oh well sounds worth it!

alfisti13


quality posts: 1 Private Messages alfisti13

OK, you got me...I fish for salmon/halibut in Sitka, so while not fly fishing, I do come back home with a nice fish box or two with chinook and dungeness crab. Love to cedar plank the salmon on the grill, so in for 3 to go with my salmon! Thanks for the well-thought out replies and looking forward to the arrival from UPS!

Vinroessler wrote:A lot of people would normally speak of Pinot Noir in regards to pH with a preface to high acid wines with matching acids in food, or acidic wines with salt. However, I feel that everyone is different and every Pinot is different. While some people are over sensitive to acids, others seem immune to acidity and the same could be said of Pinot.

I have tried a number of dishes with these Pinots, so I will mention a few of my favorite combinations:

2006 Peregrine – the wine tends to have a larger palate weight, and has hints of smoke, herbs, and nice red fruit.

At the winery we often host our distributors and Wine Club members for tastings, and we like to share, not only our wine, but also our lunches. One of my favorite pairings with the Peregrine is smoked duck breast and a nice aged Gouda. A lighter snack when shared with friends, but I am guilty of making a meal out of it at least once! The fatty acids in the duck really complement the acidity of the Peregrine, as well as the gammy flavor in both the food and the wine.

2006 La Brisa – lots of bright cherry, blackberry, and red plum, some darker fruit but not brooding on the palate.

This wine I had recently at a restaurant where we are conducting a winemaker dinner next month. The dinner will focus on a vineyard site named Griffin’s Lair in the Petaluma Gap region of the Sonoma Coast; this is also the primary source for the La Brisa. On my recent excursion we paired the wine with a wild mushroom & Fontina cheese risotto. I must say, it was like heaven in the mouth. The earthiness of the mushrooms brought out more of the lush fruit flavors, and truly showed the wines identity as a Sonoma Coast Pinot Noir.

2006 Red Label - lots of red and black cherry fruit with some hints of earth and citrus whites.

Red Label being from the Russian River has more feminine qualities. In terms of weight it is a little lighter on the palate then the other appellation Pinots. For this reason it is my salmon wine, and this is from a guy that loves fly fishing. I bring back about 50lbs from Alaska each year, so I drink a lot of Red Label. It goes well with smoked, grilled, baked, or any type of Salmon you prefer.

I am excited to hear the labrats thoughts on pairing ideas when they taste the wines…



We have been in many wine libraries with no books, yet so very much to learn...

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98

Rats (Lab & Vol), you've been packed. Awesome reviews!

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

alfisti13


quality posts: 1 Private Messages alfisti13

Sessha, thanks for the report and sounds like we are in for a nicely balanced pinot. You should have included yourself in the pictures, as your two friends look like a lot of fun to share this experience, and I'm sure your modesty is unnecessary.

sessha wrote:Labrat report:

I'm excited to report on my first Labrat experience for the 2006 Peregrine Santa Rita Hills Pinot Noir.

This turned out to be quite the day with the long-awaited inauguration here at last. This proved an appropriate toast to our newly elected president.

I had two compatriots join in the tasting:





Note that I have deliberately omitted myself due to the photogenic superiority of my friends.

Anyhow, to cut to the chase: we all found the wine to be delicious. I recommend it without reservation for anyone who enjoys pinot and am looking forward to trying the other two in the trio. Overall, it compares favorably to the 06 Sea Smoke Southing (also from Sta. Rita) that I had recently. While perhaps lacking some of the complexity of the Southing, it was no less delicious.

Color was pretty typical for a pinot-- nice and light-- passed the finger test (i.e. can see fingers through the glass).

Nose was very pronounced with notes of leather, pepper, strawberry, some earthiness. I sat and just enjoyed the nose on this for quite a while.

Mouthfeel was nice. Very good flavor profile, nice mid-palate and finish. Not quite as over the top as the Southing but very nice fruit and very approachable-- it didn't take us long to finish the bottle.

Overall, would recommend the trio highly based on the Santa Rita.

And thanks to the Woot powers-that-be for labratting me!



We have been in many wine libraries with no books, yet so very much to learn...

bkarney


quality posts: 5 Private Messages bkarney
ERMD wrote:We need a south/central fla woot gathering!



YESSS! Shoot, I'll host if we can make it happen!

CT

dianefreda


quality posts: 9 Private Messages dianefreda
ddeuddeg wrote:Unfortunately, Stuart Cellars is the only one south of LA.



Funny you should mention Stuart Cellars - my husband and I had the 04 Tatria last night and it was wonderful. I decanted for about an hour and we were going to have a glass apiece. That didn't work - too good to have just one.

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 240 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
tenuki wrote:So not sure why I didn't wonder about it until this offering, but what exactly does barrel aging do? Why PN for 9 mos. and Cab for a year and a half? Partly to impart oak, but then people switch to neutral. How many months does it take to impart oak? If it's just for aging and to let the wine progress, why take it out at all (economic reasons aside)? How do you tell when to take it out of the barrels, is it just when the tannins have softened enough so it's drinkable? Thanks,



You answered your main question, at least as far as most winemakers are concerned. Wines age more rapidly in barrels than after bottling, so basically we want the wine evolved to, or close to, a drinkable stage (this is somewhat subjective, of course). The other aspect of barrel aging is oak flavoring. Extraction from the barrel takes place at a declining geometric rate - more at first and then gradually diminishing. Many winemakers refer to four year old barrels as "neutral"; they do actually still impart some flavor and aroma to wine, just at a much much lower level than new barrels.
Pinot noir is generally more delicate than Cab, and is typically treated more gently, protected more from air, and barrel aged for less time than Cab.


jwhite6114


quality posts: 119 Private Messages jwhite6114
gijose wrote:so i told my girlfriend that i wasn't going to get this wine...

so now i won't tell her i picked it up...



Good plan! It's easier (and cheaper) to drive her off with all the secret purchasing now, before she becomes your wife. Once you're married, the whole process becomes trickier.

CT | | | | | |

michilli40


quality posts: 3 Private Messages michilli40

Why not, it is cold and snowing up here in Michigan so we have to have something to do for another 3 months....I'm in for 2
Last wooter to woot: michilli40

michilli40


quality posts: 3 Private Messages michilli40

Yes: I'm in for 2 - nothing else to do in the dead of winter in Michigan, might as well drink!
Last wooter to woot: michilli40