WootBot


quality posts: 15 Private Messages WootBot

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Crush Waits For No One / On With The Show - Wed. Aug. 27, 2008

Back in May I predicted our crush wouldn't start until a week after Labor Day, but it started today. We still have a final bottling date Friday, and it's not easy to be preparing for that at the same time we're starting crush, but what else can a poor boy do? My obsession with pop culture references has complicated the writing of this. Before I'm out of time, I figured I'd see how many Stones references I could cram into one blog. Can you make the connections?
 

Hot Stuff - Sat. Sept. 6, 2008

After a very cool, dry spring we had a moderate, sunny, albeit smoky, summer until mid-August. The last four weeks have been scorchers, with most days approaching or surpassing 100°F. After an ideal temperature regime during last year's harvest (consistent low to mid 80's), I realize you can't always get what you want. At least the air is reasonably smoke free now. I have been saying it probably wouldn't clear up completely until the autumn rains begin. Our vacation in Yosemite high country (during the time of the fire that filled Yosemite Valley with smoke) was the only time we saw totally clear skies during a two month period. Sonoma Valley filled with smoke again just three weeks ago today, when the wind shifted and came in from the northeast.

Sticky Fingers / Stop Breaking Down - Mon. Sept. 8, 2008

We've been bringing in white grapes as fast as we can; unfortunately that's only 5-6 tons a day because the press holds 1.6 to 2 tons of whole cluster fruit and a press cycle is 3 hours. Today the first Sauvignon blanc load didn't arrive until almost 10 AM, so we were here until after 6 PM for just 4 tons (2 loads). Making whites is a royal pain – sticky, sticky grapes and pomace in the air and everywhere.  The sugar becomes like glue as it dries, making the press and everything else hard to clean. Our grape sorting conveyor keeps stopping and starting. I checked all the wiring connections and everything seems okay, so I fear it's a problem with the variable frequency controller (freak drives are expensive). The yields have been a bit light so far. A hot spell in late May shattered a lot of the bloom and after we dump grapes you can see all the dead flowers coating the inside of the bins.
 

How Sweet It Is - Tues. Sept. 9, 2008

Thanks to the w00t regular who expressed the opinion that a higher alcohol level meant a drier wine. I was pleased to meet you, but I'll let them guess your name. You've inspired a little more wine 101. During fermentation, sugar is converted to ethanol (alcohol) and carbon dioxide (CO2) in a ratio of 51:49. Grapes / juice at 25% sugar, when fermented to dryness, will yield a wine of a maximum of about 12.8% alcohol by weight / 15.6% alcohol by volume (alcohol is lighter than water). Actual alcohol levels are somewhat lower because some sugar is converted to yeast biomass and some alcohol is lost via evaporation. Both sugar and alcohol have inhibitory effects on yeast metabolism, and the effects are additive. Dellè units are calculated as % sugar + (4.5 x % alcohol by vol.), with a sum of 80 generally considered stable against refermentation. This phenomenon explains why the very sweet late harvest wines such as trockenbeerenauslese have very low alcohol levels. Factors other than alcohol and sugar levels, including temperature and poor yeast nutrient status, can further limit fermentation. It gets progressively more difficult to ferment to dryness at higher sugar levels, and many wines above 15-16% alcohol have some residual grape sugar (RS).

The impression of sweetness in wine is affected by other factors in addition to RS. Alcohol lends sweetness, as do sugars and other compounds extracted from oak barrels. Fruity flavors accentuate sweetness and acidity counterbalances it. As cited by Scott Harvey, many German winemakers engineer balance into their high-acid, low alcohol wines with RS. Sugar, alcohol and oak add viscosity and body as well as sweetness. In this era of bigger is better many of the wines getting high scores from Parker and the Wine Spectator not only have lots of extract and lots of oak, but also high alcohol levels, low acid levels, and often significant RS.

I promised a short discussion of acidity and pH, so here's the low down: both affect perception of tartness, but pH is more important for several reasons. Total acidity measures the amount of acid present, but not it's strength; pH measures the strength of the acid – specifically the activity of hydrogen ions. This quality affects color, aromas and flavors, resistance to microbial growth and the effectiveness of SO2 (sulfites). The lower the pH, the stronger the activity of the acid. Most wines range in pH from 3 to 4 (3 is ten times as strong as 4). For reference, tart whites like Sauvignon blanc might have a pH of 3.2-3.3 and soft reds might have a pH of 3.8 or higher). Relatively low pH, low acid wines make winemakers happy, high pH, high acid wines are trouble. Winemakers can add tartaric acid (the main acid of grapes), which will lower pH, but also raise TA. If you're starting with a high pH, high TA wine, you have limited ability to lower pH to desirable levels without making the wine excessively tart.
 

It's All Over Now - Wed. Oct 10, 2008

I'm moving on with mixed emotions. I'll miss you, but like a prodigal son I'll see you all down the line and not fade away. I have no expectations that anyone'll get the right answer to the last trivia question, but use your imagination and let it loose. Till the next goodbye, SB.


SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste

Woops< that last paragraph was supposed to be dated Sept. 10 - I'm not into Tralfamadorian travel yet. Here's an addendum:

Random Ramblings of a Weary Winemaker, I Am Waiting

I didn't make my deadline for posting last week, so I thought I'd add a little to the blog in the aftermath of an out of control week (and use the opportunity to drop another 15 or 20 Stones references).


Paint It White Sat. Sept. 13, 2008

In a happy turn of events, it's been very cool all week. We harvested and pressed more white grapes than we ever have in a single week, with high sugars, but not over-ripe. Unfortunately, this put us between a rock and a hard place: add lots of water and dilute the flavors or make very high alcohol Chardonnay and Sauvignon blanc. I chose the former, rationalizing that I was just putting back water that normally would have been inside the grapes at harvest, and that I was only “diluting” them back to “normal”. It's still seems a bit like dirty work, a little less respectable.
Speaking of sweetness, while I was writing about sugar and alcohol I forgot to mention one of the common questions we get in the tasting room, “Does the _____ grape make a sweet wine?” The answer, of course, is that winemaking practices determine whether a wine is sweet or dry, e.g. Riesling and Gewürztraminer don't “make” sweet wines, winemakers just usually make them in a sweet style.


Get Off My Cloud Tue. Sept. 16, 2008

After a grumble and/or bemoan fate of a week last week, the continued much cooler than seasonal weather has allowed us the luxury of catching up on some “pre-crush” work that we hadn't gotten around to yet. It's been foggy until midday every day, and we even had low cumulus clouds and a few large raindrops after the fog lifted today. Daytime highs have been in the 70's for the most part, slowing ripening to a crawl. So after almost being out of our heads, now we've got it made in the shade. After doing about 25% of our projected annual tonnage last week we'll do about 1% this week and less than 10% next week. A lot of our vineyards are at the same stage: enough sugar, but too much acid and not enough flavor/color/tannin maturity. I've told over half our growers that their grapes are one to two weeks of warm weather away from harvest. Sometimes I don't know why I go wild. How can I stop?

Lighter


quality posts: 10 Private Messages Lighter
I'm moving on with mixed emotions. I'll miss you, but like a prodigal son I'll see you all down the line and not fade away.



Goodbye, Sonom' Bouliste
Who could hang a name on you?
When you change with every new day
Still I'm gonna miss you...

rpm


quality posts: 175 Private Messages rpm

I am seriously going miss your posts here. I think you have been one of the most important and helpful contributors to the success of Wine.Woot as I told you in person on the Tour!

Best wishes and I wlll continue to be a strong supporter of your work and your wine!

Wine-tasting in 8 words:
Pull lots of corks!
Remember what you taste!

jwhite6114


quality posts: 119 Private Messages jwhite6114
SonomaBouliste wrote:Woops< that last paragraph was supposed to be dated Sept. 10 - I'm not into Tralfamadorian travel yet.



When you figure it out, say, "Hi!" to Billy for me, eh?

I can't believe it's been a year that you've been writing these blogs. They have been both educational and entertaining. I do hope you stick around (even if you're no longer resident blogger) as you are as much a part of this place as the letter "W".

Thanks!

CT | | | | | |

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98

Say it ain't so, SB! Gonna miss your massively informative posts... just don't be a stranger on the forums! And what a coincidence, I'm drinking ... er... SOMETHING ... from Wellington tonight

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
rpm wrote:I am seriously going miss your posts here. I think you have been one of the most important and helpful contributors to the success of Wine.Woot as I told you in person on the Tour!

Best wishes and I wlll continue to be a strong supporter of your work and your wine!



Don't worry, I'll be around, just not writing a blog every two or three weeks. (Still hoping Scott Harvey and/or a couple of others step up and we get a rotation going.)

woopdedoo


quality posts: 36 Private Messages woopdedoo

Hey SB -

I echo other's in thanking you for the wonderful education and your unique ability in creating community between the wine makers and the wine drinkers. Perhaps you could be considered our rootstock (wootstock?).

Fortunately for me, I can experience your expertise by a short trip to the basement (we will call it a wine cellar).

Thanks.

canonizer


quality posts: 22 Private Messages canonizer
My obsession with pop culture references has complicated the writing of this. Before I'm out of time, I figured I'd see how many Stones references I could cram into one blog. Can you make the connections?



I'm not sure the stones count as pop culture anymore. Just kidding, Peter, it's been an informative pleasure reading your posts, both here as a weary wine maker and on the other boards.

Hope you stick around.

signed.

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
canonizer wrote:I'm not sure the stones count as pop culture anymore. Just kidding, Peter, it's been an informative pleasure reading your posts, both here as a weary wine maker and on the other boards.

Hope you stick around.



Well they did in my torn and frayed lifetime at least.

I'll give a groovy prize (like the one Loweeel still hasn't received) to whoever does the best job of finding all the references, lyrics and bastardizations thereof, song and album titles (watch out for the one word tiltes).



nallie


quality posts: 8 Private Messages nallie

Hey, S.B - you have been such a valuable source for this community. We'll miss your blogs, and the exposure they give us to the life of a vintner. Please do keep hanging around when time permits. You're part of the family now.

"Life is either a daring adventure or nothing at all." - h.keller
"If you can do something about it, there is no need to worry. If you cannot do anything about it, there is no use in worrying." - j.white (and also Shantideva)

JOATMON


quality posts: 19 Private Messages JOATMON
SonomaBouliste wrote:Woops< that last paragraph was supposed to be dated Sept. 10 - I'm not into Tralfamadorian travel yet. Here's an addendum:

Random Ramblings of a Weary Winemaker, I Am Waiting

I didn't make my deadline for posting last week, so I thought I'd add a little to the blog in the aftermath of an out of control week (and use the opportunity to drop another 15 or 20 Stones references).


Paint It White Sat. Sept. 13, 2008

In a happy turn of events, it's been very cool all week. We harvested and pressed more white grapes than we ever have in a single week, with high sugars, but not over-ripe. Unfortunately, this put us between a rock and a hard place: add lots of water and dilute the flavors or make very high alcohol Chardonnay and Sauvignon blanc. I chose the former, rationalizing that I was just putting back water that normally would have been inside the grapes at harvest, and that I was only “diluting” them back to “normal”. It's still seems a bit like dirty work, a little less respectable.
Speaking of sweetness, while I was writing about sugar and alcohol I forgot to mention one of the common questions we get in the tasting room, “Does the _____ grape make a sweet wine?” The answer, of course, is that winemaking practices determine whether a wine is sweet or dry, e.g. Riesling and Gewürztraminer don't “make” sweet wines, winemakers just usually make them in a sweet style.


Get Off My Cloud Tue. Sept. 16, 2008

After a grumble and/or bemoan fate of a week last week, the continued much cooler than seasonal weather has allowed us the luxury of catching up on some “pre-crush” work that we hadn't gotten around to yet. It's been foggy until midday every day, and we even had low cumulus clouds and a few large raindrops after the fog lifted today. Daytime highs have been in the 70's for the most part, slowing ripening to a crawl. So after almost being out of our heads, now we've got it made in the shade. After doing about 25% of our projected annual tonnage last week we'll do about 1% this week and less than 10% next week. A lot of our vineyards are at the same stage: enough sugar, but too much acid and not enough flavor/color/tannin maturity. I've told over half our growers that their grapes are one to two weeks of warm weather away from harvest. Sometimes I don't know why I go wild. How can I stop?



It is really difficult to believe the Stones started in 1962. Those guys are all in their '60s; I hope to be as good shape as they are when I'm their age.

Thanks for all the information and writing; both on the blogs and the discussion boards. Oh, and on the RPM tour as well (did you ever talk to John Lasseter?)

Thank goodness you're sticking around in an unofficial capacity.

Juvie: 30+24+4; Sellout: 6+7+0
Rags: 3+2+3
Drunk: 69+94+15 wine, 20+29+4 non-wine
Rugrat: 0+0+0; Refunded: 2+3+1
(as of 2011-03-02)

sanity


quality posts: 5 Private Messages sanity

SB, thanks so much for all that you've done to enhance our wine appreciation experience here at wine.woot, and at home. I've learned so much from your posts, and enjoyed it at the same time. How cool is that?

I was never a huge Stones fan, sacrilege, I know, but I got quite a few of the references, probably thanks to my brother and his friends who it seemed only listened to the Stones. Well that, and I had crushes on many of his friends, so I had to be up on what they were in to. Sticky Fingers was the summer I learned how to rotate tires, change the spark plugs, and do other simple maintenance on the family car, a Dodge Dart, just to impress the boys.

OK, so now we know why many vintners prefer to make red wine; not the romance or mystery, not for style or elegance, but because they don't want to deal with the great amount of pomace! Thanks for the short discussion on acidity and pH. I'm curious, did you save a little of the the Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc before water was added, to taste down the road? I would think that would be so interesting, not to mention educational, to compare the 2 different products.

Finally, thanks for making really consistent, superior wines, for the price. I don't mean consistent in tasting the same from year to year, but consistent in that across the board, the wines are tasty..... I really appreciate, considering how many different varietals of yours we've been offered, that each one has a distinctive taste, of the varietal, the terroir, the winemaker.

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
nallie wrote:Hey, S.B - you have been such a valuable source for this community. We'll miss your blogs, and the exposure they give us to the life of a vintner. Please do keep hanging around when time permits. You're part of the family now.



I know, I know.

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
JOATMON wrote:It is really difficult to believe the Stones started in 1962. Those guys are all in their '60s; I hope to be as good shape as they are when I'm their age.



Although Mick is beginning to look eerily like Don Knotts' twin brother

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
sanity wrote:SB, thanks so much for all that you've done to enhance our wine appreciation experience here at wine.woot, and at home. I've learned so much from your posts, and enjoyed it at the same time. How cool is that?

I was never a huge Stones fan, sacrilege, I know, but I got quite a few of the references, probably thanks to my brother and his friends who it seemed only listened to the Stones. Well that, and I had crushes on many of his friends, so I had to be up on what they were in to. Sticky Fingers was the summer I learned how to rotate tires, change the spark plugs, and do other simple maintenance on the family car, a Dodge Dart, just to impress the boys.

OK, so now we know why many vintners prefer to make red wine; not the romance or mystery, not for style or elegance, but because they don't want to deal with the great amount of pomace! Thanks for the short discussion on acidity and pH. I'm curious, did you save a little of the the Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc before water was added, to taste down the road? I would think that would be so interesting, not to mention educational, to compare the 2 different products.

Finally, thanks for making really consistent, superior wines, for the price. I don't mean consistent in tasting the same from year to year, but consistent in that across the board, the wines are tasty..... I really appreciate, considering how many different varietals of yours we've been offered, that each one has a distinctive taste, of the varietal, the terroir, the winemaker.



Thanks for the props - that's what I'm aiming for re winemaking. We do comparisons of many things, but not 16% alc. whites. I've tasted enough 15% whites to know I don't want to go there. I try to minimize any adjustments or "manipulations", so the higher sugar lots don't get brought all the way down to 14% potential alcohol or below, just far enough so we can get them dry and blend them with other lots to obtain around 14%.

Truth be told, I was a bigger Beatles and Dylan fan, but the Stones have made a lot of great rock'nroll.

yathink2


quality posts: 4 Private Messages yathink2

Thank you SB, I have really learned from and enjoyed your blogs and posts. Please stick around when you can... I will miss your blogs but I do understand that it can be a lot of work, another hat so to speak... Take care



timbyrd


quality posts: 2 Private Messages timbyrd

Ditto what the others said. Thanks for everything. If you played quidditch, I'm sure nallie would run up a "Peter for President" out of an old sheet and we'd be waving it in the stands.

I like to think I voted with my pocketbook right after the rpm tour...

Take care,

-- T

Official holder of unofficial, unauthorized, non-woot gatherings.
My cellar

MarkDaSpark


quality posts: 185 Private Messages MarkDaSpark
timbyrd wrote:Ditto what the others said. Thanks for everything. If you played quidditch, I'm sure nallie would run up a "Peter for President" out of an old sheet and we'd be waving it in the stands.

I like to think I voted with my pocketbook right after the rpm tour...

Take care,

-- T



I can verify that, since I helped him organize his Wellingtons last night. The 4 cases he brought back, plus previous Woot Wellington shipments. I think he had around 120 Wellington bottles.

Say hi to Toby for us.


Someone has to put WD's kids thru college, but why does it have to be me!
*This post is for purposes of enabling only, and does not constitute any promise of helping pay for said enabling. It does indicate willingness to assist in drinking said wine.

MaskedMarvel


quality posts: 11 Private Messages MaskedMarvel
timbyrd wrote:... I'm sure nallie would run up a "Peter for President" out of an old sheet and we'd be waving it in the stands...



I'd be first in line for an SonomaBouliste/labROUS 2008 tee shirt...



...best I could do on such short notice....

Corrado


quality posts: 130 Private Messages Corrado

Volunteer Moderator

I promised a short discussion of acidity and pH, so here's the low down: both affect perception of tartness, but pH is more important for several reasons. Total acidity measures the amount of acid present, but not it's strength; pH measures the strength of the acid – specifically the activity of hydrogen ions. This quality affects color, aromas and flavors, resistance to microbial growth and the effectiveness of SO2 (sulfites). The lower the pH, the stronger the activity of the acid. Most wines range in pH from 3 to 4 (3 is ten times as strong as 4). For reference, tart whites like Sauvignon blanc might have a pH of 3.2-3.3 and soft reds might have a pH of 3.8 or higher). Relatively low pH, low acid wines make winemakers happy, high pH, high acid wines are trouble. Winemakers can add tartaric acid (the main acid of grapes), which will lower pH, but also raise TA. If you're starting with a high pH, high TA wine, you have limited ability to lower pH to desirable levels without making the wine excessively tart.



Thanks for an incredible year of blogging, Peter. I've loved the opportunity to get into the mind of a master!

Re: acid. That paragraph goes a long ways in starting to clear up what is for me one of the mysteries a bottle. I don't know what the sensations & perceptions are that separate high/low acid from high/low tannin or high/low RS, but at least that starts giving me information to feed into the palate computer.

When you're talking about TA vs. pH, am I correctly paraphrasing that the final pH of the wine is relative to the strenght of the acid component? A weak acid would require higher concentration (therefore more TA by volume) to get the wine to the same pH as compared to a strong acid? Therefore, the desired low TA, low pH condition gives a wine where the acid component by volume is low, allowing other wine elements to be more concentrated while maintaining low pH.

Am I on the right track or am I moonlight mile away from where I should be?

Corrado's Training Blog @ http://DrawnOutsideTheLinesOfReason.blogspot.com/
http://twitter.com/Corrado
**********************


It's not my fault that I love Gatzby! He's such a pretty, pretty "man."

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous

i will echo what others have already said: you have been an invaluable resource to this community, but you have also been much more than that. i sincerely hope that we can collectively continue the friendships (cyber, rpm tour & otherwise) that this medium has allowed us to pursue w/ you. the challenge will certainly be for YOU to remember us, as that task is made easy for the rest of us: just pop, pour & sip a delightful bottle of one of your wines.

à ta santé mon ami!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
Corrado wrote:Thanks for an incredible year of blogging, Peter. I've loved the opportunity to get into the mind of a master!

Re: acid. That paragraph goes a long ways in starting to clear up what is for me one of the mysteries a bottle. I don't know what the sensations & perceptions are that separate high/low acid from high/low tannin or high/low RS, but at least that starts giving me information to feed into the palate computer.

When you're talking about TA vs. pH, am I correctly paraphrasing that the final pH of the wine is relative to the strenght of the acid component? A weak acid would require higher concentration (therefore more TA by volume) to get the wine to the same pH as compared to a strong acid? Therefore, the desired low TA, low pH condition gives a wine where the acid component by volume is low, allowing other wine elements to be more concentrated while maintaining low pH.

Am I on the right track or am I moonlight mile away from where I should be?



You're right between the buttons except maybe the part about concentration of other elements. Reasonably low pH is desirable for wine stability and longevity, and in a low pH + low TA situation you can get that without excessive tartness. In a high pH + low TA situation you can usually add acid to lower pH without creating excessive tartness. In a high pH + high TA situation you're kind of up the creek without a paddle - there's not a lot you can do. The prevalent acid in wine is tartaric acid, with the other main, somewhat weaker, acids being malic and lactic. The ratio of these acids has some effect on pH, but buffering factors such as potassium level come into play as well. One high tech way to lower pH without adding acid is to run a small fraction of the wine through an ion exchange column, replacing potassium and other cations with hydrogen. This also is a pretty harsh process which can remove a lot of desirable components; I don't know of many people using this for high-end wines.

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
themostrighteous wrote:i will echo what others have already said: you have been an invaluable resource to this community, but you have also been much more than that. i sincerely hope that we can collectively continue the friendships (cyber, rpm tour & otherwise) that this medium has allowed us to pursue w/ you. the challenge will certainly be for YOU to remember us, as that task is made easy for the rest of us: just pop, pour & sip a delightful bottle of one of your wines.

à ta santé mon ami!




Merci beaucoup, or should I say, ¡Muchachas Garcias, Homeboy!

andyduncan


quality posts: 32 Private Messages andyduncan

Because I know how SB likes to summarize a complex and subjective impression of something with a succinct and vapid number, I give this year of Ramblings 94 points.

I'm putting WD's kids through college.

nematic


quality posts: 6 Private Messages nematic
andyduncan wrote:Because I know how SB likes to summarize a complex and subjective impression of something with a succinct and vapid number, I give this year of Ramblings 94 points.



someone else said that one should never read your posts with a mouthful of liquid. Very sage advice

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
andyduncan wrote:Because I know how SB likes to summarize a complex and subjective impression of something with a succinct and vapid number, I give this year of Ramblings 94 points.



What? With the flowery prose, stale puns, occassional lack of focus and intensity, I'd only give it 12x5 (60).

BTW - To win the contest (and some kind of cool stuff) you'll need to list the RS references that I and others have made here in the discussion. Only one sonng has activated the w00t filter so far.

Corrado


quality posts: 130 Private Messages Corrado

Volunteer Moderator

SonomaBouliste wrote:You're right between the buttons except maybe the part about concentration of other elements. Reasonably low pH is desirable for wine stability and longevity, and in a low pH + low TA situation you can get that without excessive tartness. In a high pH + low TA situation you can usually add acid to lower pH without creating excessive tartness. In a high pH + high TA situation you're kind of up the creek without a paddle - there's not a lot you can do. The prevalent acid in wine is tartaric acid, with the other main, somewhat weaker, acids being malic and lactic. The ratio of these acids has some effect on pH, but buffering factors such as potassium level come into play as well. One high tech way to lower pH without adding acid is to run a small fraction of the wine through an ion exchange column, replacing potassium and other cations with hydrogen. This also is a pretty harsh process which can remove a lot of desirable components; I don't know of many people using this for high-end wines.



Thanks for the f/up. Last question (of this post at least). You defined a typical range for pH. Can the same range be applied to TA? When looking at a stat sheet, how does one know if TA is high or low?

Corrado's Training Blog @ http://DrawnOutsideTheLinesOfReason.blogspot.com/
http://twitter.com/Corrado
**********************


It's not my fault that I love Gatzby! He's such a pretty, pretty "man."

SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
Corrado wrote:Thanks for the f/up. Last question (of this post at least). You defined a typical range for pH. Can the same range be applied to TA? When looking at a stat sheet, how does one know if TA is high or low?



Typical range for "medium acid balance" is maybe .55 to .70 g/100ml. .8 or higher will probably taste pretty tart even if the pH is high. The legal minimum for California wine is .3g/100ml. I usually pay little or no attention to TA, either at the winery or when looking at stat sheets. If I'm going to get any inclination as to wine style from stat sheets I'm looking at alc.%, pH, type and amount of new oak, vineyard source (incl. appellation), and fermentation information.
BTW, TA is expressed as the equivalent amount of tartaric acid (different acids have diff. molecular weights). In Europe TA is expressed as g/l equivalents of sulfuric acid. There isn't any sulfuric acid in wine, it's just a common, stable standard for comparison. Since the MW of sulfuric acid is about two-thirds that of tartaric acid, what we express as a TA of .6 g/100ml (or 6g/l) would be equivalent to a TA of 4 g/l to a European.

amythewino


quality posts: 0 Private Messages amythewino

SB - thanks again for the great tour and explanation for us on Saturday - it was a great time and we learned a bit as well!

We are looking forward to our Victory - it should be home soon. In transit right now. We did buy one of your cool bottle openers to use on our bottle of Duke and left the dang thing in our carry on. So you can rest easy knowing that Homeland Security saved the good people of Southwest Airlines from two semi-tipsy boomers armed with a Wellington bottle opener.

Thanks again!

Corrado


quality posts: 130 Private Messages Corrado

Volunteer Moderator

SonomaBouliste wrote:Typical range for "medium acid balance" is maybe .55 to .70 g/100ml. .8 or higher will probably taste pretty tart even if the pH is high. The legal minimum for California wine is .3g/100ml. I usually pay little or no attention to TA, either at the winery or when looking at stat sheets. If I'm going to get any inclination as to wine style from stat sheets I'm looking at alc.%, pH, type and amount of new oak, vineyard source (incl. appellation), and fermentation information.
BTW, TA is expressed as the equivalent amount of tartaric acid (different acids have diff. molecular weights). In Europe TA is expressed as g/l equivalents of sulfuric acid. There isn't any sulfuric acid in wine, it's just a common, stable standard for comparison. Since the MW of sulfuric acid is about two-thirds that of tartaric acid, what we express as a TA of .6 g/100ml (or 6g/l) would be equivalent to a TA of 4 g/l to a European.



Good stuff! Thanks for the add-on info! Is there a quick answer as to the legal minimum of TA by CA law?

At some point here I'm going to just have to face the facts that you're fading away and just turn my head until the darkness goes.

Corrado's Training Blog @ http://DrawnOutsideTheLinesOfReason.blogspot.com/
http://twitter.com/Corrado
**********************


It's not my fault that I love Gatzby! He's such a pretty, pretty "man."

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
Corrado wrote:At some point here I'm going to just have to face the facts that you're fading away and just turn my head until the darkness goes.


in the basement of a community center somewhere in Middle America...

"hello. my name is tmr. and i am a SonomaBouliste-aholic. i have been SonomaBouliste-free for..."

<chokes up>

"it's OK, tmr, we've all been through this. you CAN pull through. this too shall pass."

"does the pain EVER go away?"

"no, tmr, it does not."

"NOOOOOOOOOO!"

:P

do you know... what biodynamics is?

polarbear22


quality posts: 35 Private Messages polarbear22

Time for me to complete that project.

Got a lot of rain this weekend, so I should be able to get draft #2 out earlier this week. This is going to be a great reference.

Polar bears are meant to be clever, very clever. They are the Einsteins of the bear community. - Anonymous
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SonomaBouliste


quality posts: 238 Private Messages SonomaBouliste
Corrado wrote:Good stuff! Thanks for the add-on info! Is there a quick answer as to the legal minimum of TA by CA law?

At some point here I'm going to just have to face the facts that you're fading away and just turn my head until the darkness goes.



I looked it up, and the legal minimum is .3 for white wines, .4 for red wines, and .25 for "others" (dessert wines, flavored wines, etc.). I assume it has to do with the widest possible definition of iwne, akin to the legal limits of alcohol in wine (7% to 24%).

penkauskasd


quality posts: 0 Private Messages penkauskasd

Peter, Ill miss your regular blog too. Super insightful and helps us noobs figure out the wine world (a blurry version of Wayne's World).

BTW, just had a bottle of your 2004 Victory Reserve that our good friends Phil and Amy picked up for us at your winery last week (Amy says thanks for the tour). Wow. My wife and I thinks it's the best wine we've had for several years. Big, dark, smooth, lucious - really outstanding on all levels. Yum.

Hope you keep the comments rolling in.

boatman72


quality posts: 13 Private Messages boatman72

Hi All,

Let us all raise a glass of Wellington to salute someone that not only shares his knowledge and liquid elixir, but seems to be a really cool, down to earth, in the trenches kind of person. Salute, here, here!! Never say "goodbye", just "see ya later."

May be the last time, could be the last time, I don't know.....oh yeah