bbraud


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bbraud

Any information on laying these bottles down? Drink now or cellar?

bbraud


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bbraud
bbraud wrote:Any information on laying these bottles down? Drink now or cellar?



Never mind -- found the answer in an earlier post.

Daystar


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Daystar

Come on RATS!

UBlink


quality posts: 18 Private Messages UBlink
Daystar wrote:Come on RATS!


Yeah, claret, breakfast of champions.

Following the eight word profile, political economy in eight words:
Ain't no free lunch - them what has gets.

Daystar


quality posts: 4 Private Messages Daystar

I see the PS from Benziger is from Caton vineyards. As in Ty Caton maybe?

rco


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rco

I'm not a big poster, but feel compelled to comment because several of the most active people on this site are so vocal in their opposition to biodynamic farming. I admit to being skeptical of the mystical aspects of the underlying philosophy, but I do not believe the Benzigers emphasize that.

Here in Virginia I can see the lesions on the fish from the Shenandoah and James Rivers thought to be caused by fertilizer run-off. I do not understand why my grandfather and many prior generations of farmers in my family planted corn and wheat based on the phase of the moon, but they did and it worked very well. I know I can taste a big difference in the organic tomatoes and melons compared to those from truck farms using chemical fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides. And I do believe in the concept of "terroir" determining the quality of wine. Farming practices like those of the Benzigers build a vital soil microenvironment. Forgoing use of petrodriven machines, eliminates the gas, fumes and spillage of gas or diesel fuel, which I believe could be imparted to the vines and grapes. The farming practices and stewardship of the land shown by the Benziger family reduce pollution, use of nonrenewable energy and leave the land better than when they began.

I do not believe biodymnamic winemaking is a marketing ploy. Regardless of my admiration for their farming methods, I wouldn't buy the wine unless it was good and high QPR. I've seen nothing but outstanding reviews and scores for the Benziger wines, particularly the Stone Farm CS. These are award winning wines at nearly half price. I am happy to get them and hope we will see more like this on ww in the future.

Loweeel


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Loweeel
rco wrote:I'm not a big poster, but feel compelled to comment because several of the most active people on this site are so vocal in their opposition to biodynamic farming. I admit to being skeptical of the mystical aspects of the underlying philosophy, but I do not believe the Benzigers emphasize that.

Here in Virginia I can see the lesions on the fish from the Shenandoah and James Rivers thought to be caused by fertilizer run-off. I do not understand why my grandfather and many prior generations of farmers in my family planted corn and wheat based on the phase of the moon, but they did and it worked very well. I know I can taste a big difference in the organic tomatoes and melons compared to those from truck farms using chemical fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides. And I do believe in the concept of "terroir" determining the quality of wine. Farming practices like those of the Benzigers build a vital soil microenvironment. Forgoing use of petrodriven machines, eliminates the gas, fumes and spillage of gas or diesel fuel, which I believe could be imparted to the vines and grapes. The farming practices and stewardship of the land shown by the Benziger family reduce pollution, use of nonrenewable energy and leave the land better than when they began.

I do not believe biodymnamic winemaking is a marketing ploy. Regardless of my admiration for their farming methods, I wouldn't buy the wine unless it was good and high QPR. I've seen nothing but outstanding reviews and scores for the Benziger wines, particularly the Stone Farm CS. These are award winning wines at nearly half price. I am happy to get them and hope we will see more like this on ww in the future.



Not to threadjack, please see the long discussions this week on the CyberPub; previous discussion are also linked.

Favorites: Roessler ¬ KRPN ¬ Etude ¬ Stuart ¬ KRPort ¬ Tøøthstejnn ¬ Titus ¬ URSA ¬ InZin ¬ SBMystery ¬ SxBS&Z+4 ¬ DC3&4 ¬ TyC3&FB ¬ FeEquus ¬ PSPS ¬ Harvey ¬ SBRes&CR ¬ Corison ¬ Noceto ¬ Humbug ¬ KRSEXY3SOME ¬ PoiZin06 ¬ POLY ¬ Castoro ¬ SBCab ¬ KRPS2K ¬ HW12 ¬ GSaké ¬ הגפןCab ¬ PepBr

CT ¬ PSychos' Path
"The one difference between me and Petite Sirah is that I don't have a dumb period." - YT

Winedavid39


quality posts: 196 Private Messages Winedavid39

Guest Blogger

Daystar wrote:I see the PS from Benziger is from Caton vineyards. As in Ty Caton maybe?




correct.

Loweeel


quality posts: 5 Private Messages Loweeel
Winedavid39 wrote:correct.



So that means it's not BD! HA! In your face, taunters!

Favorites: Roessler ¬ KRPN ¬ Etude ¬ Stuart ¬ KRPort ¬ Tøøthstejnn ¬ Titus ¬ URSA ¬ InZin ¬ SBMystery ¬ SxBS&Z+4 ¬ DC3&4 ¬ TyC3&FB ¬ FeEquus ¬ PSPS ¬ Harvey ¬ SBRes&CR ¬ Corison ¬ Noceto ¬ Humbug ¬ KRSEXY3SOME ¬ PoiZin06 ¬ POLY ¬ Castoro ¬ SBCab ¬ KRPS2K ¬ HW12 ¬ GSaké ¬ הגפןCab ¬ PepBr

CT ¬ PSychos' Path
"The one difference between me and Petite Sirah is that I don't have a dumb period." - YT

wootvirgin69


quality posts: 2 Private Messages wootvirgin69
rco wrote:I'm not a big poster, but feel compelled to comment because several of the most active people on this site are so vocal in their opposition to biodynamic farming. I admit to being skeptical of the mystical aspects of the underlying philosophy, but I do not believe the Benzigers emphasize that.

Here in Virginia I can see the lesions on the fish from the Shenandoah and James Rivers thought to be caused by fertilizer run-off. I do not understand why my grandfather and many prior generations of farmers in my family planted corn and wheat based on the phase of the moon, but they did and it worked very well. I know I can taste a big difference in the organic tomatoes and melons compared to those from truck farms using chemical fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides. And I do believe in the concept of "terroir" determining the quality of wine. Farming practices like those of the Benzigers build a vital soil microenvironment. Forgoing use of petrodriven machines, eliminates the gas, fumes and spillage of gas or diesel fuel, which I believe could be imparted to the vines and grapes. The farming practices and stewardship of the land shown by the Benziger family reduce pollution, use of nonrenewable energy and leave the land better than when they began.

I do not believe biodymnamic winemaking is a marketing ploy. Regardless of my admiration for their farming methods, I wouldn't buy the wine unless it was good and high QPR. I've seen nothing but outstanding reviews and scores for the Benziger wines, particularly the Stone Farm CS. These are award winning wines at nearly half price. I am happy to get them and hope we will see more like this on ww in the future.



Well said. I myself don't particularly care how they produce the wine, as long as the result is GOOD JUICE!! If it so happens that their "biodymnamic" process (which, IMHO, is really a fancy word for holistic) actually improves the surrounding envoronment, then hell...I'm all for it. Around here though, all processes aside, it just better be good!

wootvirgin69


quality posts: 2 Private Messages wootvirgin69
Loweeel wrote:So that means it's not BD! HA! In your face, taunters!



HAHAHA...you were waiting to pounce on that one. Maybe it can still be considered BD as long as all of the process used to produce the wine itself are still in line, even if the grapes were grown elsewhere. Dunno, just hypothesizin'.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
Loweeel wrote:So that means it's not BD! HA! In your face, taunters!



pub

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

dnasquesttoblack3000


quality posts: 2 Private Messages dnasquesttoblack3000

Kathy (or anyone who knows),

I read a few months ago that Pollan book, 'The Ominovores Dillemma'. I learned alot from it, and really liked it. Towards the end, he has a rather long chapter where he farms with a guy from Virginia who owns Polyface farms. This guys subscribes to a non mono-culture method of farming where he allows chickens, cows and agriculture to all grow on his farm at the same time, citing a natural balance between what the vegetables give to the animals, and vice versa.

Is this an example of biodynamic farming? After reading much of the stuff in the Pub, I'm lead to believe not, but I'm not sure I really understand it. I'm a big believer in organic farming, sustainable farming practices (SB woot!) and not pumping my food full of chemicals when I can afford it. CSAs, farmers markets, grass fed, free range, the works.

Without meainng to start a huge debate in the main thread I'll ask this: Could you, or anyone maybe describe in a bit more detail than you did before what exactly is involved in biodynamic farming?

thanks

the quest:

1. humbug 2. GV's book 3. Wellington 3+mystery (X2) 4. woot norse thingy with funny bottle (X2) 5. va made me buy gundlach, 6. your mumm 7. willy nilly pinots 8. emergency woot wine 9. fake gunbun, 10. ty field 11. tryasipo'dis

dnasquesttoblack3000


quality posts: 2 Private Messages dnasquesttoblack3000

Loon, check your gmail when you get a chance please. Time for me to get some wellington in my stomach

the quest:

1. humbug 2. GV's book 3. Wellington 3+mystery (X2) 4. woot norse thingy with funny bottle (X2) 5. va made me buy gundlach, 6. your mumm 7. willy nilly pinots 8. emergency woot wine 9. fake gunbun, 10. ty field 11. tryasipo'dis

InHoc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages InHoc

I received the Claret about 30 minutes ago, and opened it immediately.

I'm quite skeptical of wine reviews (not wine.woot, but Wine Spectator, Wine Enthusiast, etc.). I do find that I agree with Robert Parker, more than I disagree. I mention this to give you a reference for my biases. I love fruit and complex structure. My favorites are Martinelli, Turley (I'm still hanging in there) and Rafanelli. Sonoma ZIn is probably the pinnacle of wine for me. The bordeaux-style claret is a great match.

The initial nose on this wine is hot (alcohol), but it settled down within a few minutes. The color for a 2004 indicated a full-bodied wine with just a little age on it - not as inky as a PS, but a deep red. The legs are fantastic. My wife and I are getting a tremendous amount of blackcurrant.

On that note, my wife has, unfortunately, become quite discriminating about the wines that she drinks, and she has mentioned that she really likes this and wants to know how many I purchased (so much for bottle shock!).

More notes to follow as it opens up.

iByron


quality posts: 40 Private Messages iByron

I swear when I first read

1 2004 Winemaker’s Claret Sonoma

I thought it read, "2004 Winemaker's Clarinet Sonata"

I need to get more sleep.

iByron's iCellar (I'm a reciprocal CT Cellar Buddy)

Your Private WIneaux

jwhite6114


quality posts: 119 Private Messages jwhite6114
iByron wrote:I swear when I first read

1 2004 Winemaker’s Claret Sonoma

I thought it read, "2004 Winemaker's Clarinet Sonata"

I need to get more sleep.



The question, though, is did you click the I Want One button for that Sonoma Clarinet?

CT | | | | | |

KathyBenziger


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KathyBenziger

Yes, we do use all the preparations.

KathyBenziger


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KathyBenziger
Krugsters wrote:Hi Kathy
Thanks for taking the time to answer questions during such a busy time in the vineyard.

Does your vineyard use all nine different preparations for fertilization or do you just employ 500 & 501?

So curious about these wines. In for 1.



Yes, we do use all the preps in our composting.

KathyBenziger


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KathyBenziger
wootvirgin69 wrote:HAHAHA...you were waiting to pounce on that one. Maybe it can still be considered BD as long as all of the process used to produce the wine itself are still in line, even if the grapes were grown elsewhere. Dunno, just hypothesizin'.



I'm sorry - I didn't mean to indicate that all our wines are Biodynamic. We produce wines from three different farming tiers - Biodynamic, organic and certified sustainable. Our estate wines are all certified Biodynamic. In this grouping the Stone Farm Vineyard is the only one farmed Biodynamically (and even this wine is still one year away from certification), the Feingold Merlot is organic and the Claret is sustainable.

I apologize for any misleading on my part.

bkarney


quality posts: 5 Private Messages bkarney
KathyBenziger wrote:I'm sorry - I didn't mean to indicate that all our wines are Biodynamic. We produce wines from three different farming tiers - Biodynamic, organic and certified sustainable. Our estate wines are all certified Biodynamic. In this grouping the Stone Farm Vineyard is the only one farmed Biodynamically (and even this wine is still one year away from certification), the Feingold Merlot is organic and the Claret is sustainable.

I apologize for any misleading on my part.



aaah, and the fog clears. Thank you for that clarification. So is it safe to assume that Organic incorporates "sustainable" and BD incorporates "Organic"? Meaning, the Stone Farm is Sustainable, Organic and BD ... right?

CT

KathyBenziger


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KathyBenziger
dnasquesttoblack3000 wrote:Kathy (or anyone who knows),

I read a few months ago that Pollan book, 'The Ominovores Dillemma'. I learned alot from it, and really liked it. Towards the end, he has a rather long chapter where he farms with a guy from Virginia who owns Polyface farms. This guys subscribes to a non mono-culture method of farming where he allows chickens, cows and agriculture to all grow on his farm at the same time, citing a natural balance between what the vegetables give to the animals, and vice versa.

Is this an example of biodynamic farming? After reading much of the stuff in the Pub, I'm lead to believe not, but I'm not sure I really understand it. I'm a big believer in organic farming, sustainable farming practices (SB woot!) and not pumping my food full of chemicals when I can afford it. CSAs, farmers markets, grass fed, free range, the works.

Without meainng to start a huge debate in the main thread I'll ask this: Could you, or anyone maybe describe in a bit more detail than you did before what exactly is involved in biodynamic farming?

thanks



I have read Omivoroes Dilemma and really enjoyed it. The farm you described does have many of the same values as we do. However, to be certified Biodynamic you do have to follow specific standards from the Demeter association and be inspected each year. These standards include the application of homeopathic remedies (most of which go into composting) in the vineyard. I don't believe Polyface Farms claimed to be Biodynamic although their methods are defintely on the right track.

KathyBenziger


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KathyBenziger
bkarney wrote:aaah, and the fog clears. Thank you for that clarification. So is it safe to assume that Organic incorporates "sustainable" and BD incorporates "Organic"? Meaning, the Stone Farm is Sustainable, Organic and BD ... right?



Right, the levels incorporate each other.

woopdedoo


quality posts: 35 Private Messages woopdedoo
dianefreda wrote:These are my kind of wines-I order almost every week-love almost every wine I have gotten-when do I get to be a labrat???



I guess the answer is - THIS WEEK!

InHoc


quality posts: 0 Private Messages InHoc
InHoc wrote:I received the Claret about 30 minutes ago, and opened it immediately.

I'm quite skeptical of wine reviews (not wine.woot, but Wine Spectator, Wine Enthusiast, etc.). I do find that I agree with Robert Parker, more than I disagree. I mention this to give you a reference for my biases. I love fruit and complex structure. My favorites are Martinelli, Turley (I'm still hanging in there) and Rafanelli. Sonoma ZIn is probably the pinnacle of wine for me. The bordeaux-style claret is a great match.

The initial nose on this wine is hot (alcohol), but it settled down within a few minutes. The color for a 2004 indicated a full-bodied wine with just a little age on it - not as inky as a PS, but a deep red. The legs are fantastic. My wife and I are getting a tremendous amount of blackcurrant.

On that note, my wife has, unfortunately, become quite discriminating about the wines that she drinks, and she has mentioned that she really likes this and wants to know how many I purchased (so much for bottle shock!).

More notes to follow as it opens up.



We're at about 1.5 hours, and much of the fruit has faded to the back, and a spiciness has come forward. Not a hot, alcohol spice, but a cracked pepper-type of spice. It really does have that mouth-coating feel to it.

LoonBoarder


quality posts: 5 Private Messages LoonBoarder
dnasquesttoblack3000 wrote:Loon, check your gmail when you get a chance please. Time for me to get some wellington in my stomach



GMail back atcha.

Dude... wait, what?

Shacho


quality posts: 0 Private Messages Shacho

nevermind.

I think what I was asking re: wootlegging was not of the legal variety on woot.com's forums.

dnasquesttoblack3000


quality posts: 2 Private Messages dnasquesttoblack3000
Shacho wrote:nevermind.

I think what I was asking re: wootlegging was not of the legal variety on woot.com's forums.



hopefully if you need a CT wootleg, someone will PM you who can help out.

the quest:

1. humbug 2. GV's book 3. Wellington 3+mystery (X2) 4. woot norse thingy with funny bottle (X2) 5. va made me buy gundlach, 6. your mumm 7. willy nilly pinots 8. emergency woot wine 9. fake gunbun, 10. ty field 11. tryasipo'dis

thelusiv


quality posts: 0 Private Messages thelusiv

In for 1, my first wine.woot! Am I the only person in SC getting in on this deal?

thepatch


quality posts: 0 Private Messages thepatch

Benziger Family Winery Red Trio
Current numbers (updated each minute):

First sucker: cbloszinsky
Speed to first woot: 0m -9.-220s

Last wooter to woot: thepatch

I held off for a bit but I was 99% sure I was snagging one right off the bat. I'm a sucker for Claret's. Prolly have to pepsi challenge the Benziger versus my favorite California Claret so far by Steltzner. Bring it on!

elections2k


quality posts: 0 Private Messages elections2k

So, an otherwise lackluster Monday afternoon started looking up with e-mail from WineDavid tipping me off to my upcoming good fortune. Aside from having to wait 24 more hours to see what would accompany the Golden Ticket, I experienced all the usual emotions that go along with the prospect of free hooch: lust and yearning chief among them.

Once at work yesterday, my ears pricked up every time I heard the elevator, waiting to hear the mail guy shuffling toward my cube. But at noon there was still no package – three hours after the usual delivery time.

Flummoxed, I hit up the FedEx site to track the package. “On Truck for Delivery” it said, and I was reassured. However, as the afternoon waned, I got increasingly worried. “On Truck for Delivery.” F5 “On Truck for Delivery.” F5 “On Truck for Delivery.” Damnit!

Just after 6 p.m., the FedEx message changed. “Delivery failed. No recipient over 21 years old available.” Finally, it hit me: after a purchase on the regular Woot! Site I’d changed the shipping info to my home address and hadn’t changed it back in my rush to go in for two of what I consider to be a pretty nice WineWoot.

Thus began a mad rush through the Chicago suburbs in an attempt to liberate my free (and currently incarcerated) wine. Fortunately, the story has a happy ending in the form of the Feingold Merlot.

Dinner was grilled lamb and vegetables and couscous, but I started with the wine on its own. Nice aroma, pleasant color, but I found it a little tight on the first sip. Less up front fruit than I expected and quite dry. I did not decant, but would do so next time.

The wine opened up a bit as I worked the grill. Some dark fruit started to come out, but still the overall effect was thin on the tongue, still quite dry, some leather notes. Hmmmm … perhaps this will improve with the meal.

Happily, it did. The lamb, nicely charred and a little fatty in that good way, finally pulled out some of the blueberry mentioned on the label. All in all very enjoyable, but something I’m not sure I’d have on its own a second time. Smartly paired, however, this would be great.

I’m looking forward to seeing what the other two bottles in this trio hold.

Thanks WD!

afranke


quality posts: 10 Private Messages afranke
elections2k wrote:



Thanks for the good report. Just out of curiosity, how'd you prepare the lamb?

alexandra29


quality posts: 1 Private Messages alexandra29
KathyBenziger wrote:I have read Omivoroes Dilemma and really enjoyed it. The farm you described does have many of the same values as we do. However, to be certified Biodynamic you do have to follow specific standards from the Demeter association and be inspected each year. These standards include the application of homeopathic remedies (most of which go into composting) in the vineyard. I don't believe Polyface Farms claimed to be Biodynamic although their methods are defintely on the right track.



I am fortunate enough to live near enough to Polyface that I can buy from them several times a year... in fact, we are having chicken from Polyface for dinner tonight. I was already in for three of this offer, but if the difference in wine from Benziger is comparable to the difference in chicken (and beef, and BACON, the BACON is amazing) I get from Polyface, compared to store-bought, I wish I could be in for 10 more... this kind of farming makes a huge difference in quality, in my experience! It is, I hope, the future.

iceeblue7


quality posts: 3 Private Messages iceeblue7

I'm in for two because even given the quiet nature of the forums this week it seems like a good deal with some fair lab-ratorey.

I do not know anything about biodymnamic farming but I do know that you can make wine anyway you see fit. Even if the methods are unorthodox. I support the effort and forethought put in to improve the product from soil to grape. Ultimately the proof will be in the bottle. You will have wine I like, or you won't. Regardless of whether it is stored in a pyramid or picked when the mars is rising I know you thought about this product and cared about the end result so I look forward to trying it.

javadrinker


quality posts: 4 Private Messages javadrinker

In for 1 myself. Seems like the wine is made in a style I will enjoy. Thanks to the lab rats for their input.

And the path to drunken poverty continues... Java's Stash at CT

  • Wine.woots: um, lost count.
  • Other woots: um, lost count too. I might have a problem.

rco


quality posts: 0 Private Messages rco
alexandra29 wrote:I am fortunate enough to live near enough to Polyface that I can buy from them several times a year... in fact, we are having chicken from Polyface for dinner tonight. I was already in for three of this offer, but if the difference in wine from Benziger is comparable to the difference in chicken (and beef, and BACON, the BACON is amazing) I get from Polyface, compared to store-bought, I wish I could be in for 10 more... this kind of farming makes a huge difference in quality, in my experience! It is, I hope, the future.



I live in Charlottesville and agree with everything you said. A lot of the best places here serve Polyface meat and eggs. (For NoVa wooters: They don't ship, but they do make regular local deliveries, including the DC area.) Like you I'm hoping Benziger is the "Polyface" of wine. We're trying to decide whether my wife should make a second order of 3 before midnight.

2ndIdentity


quality posts: 0 Private Messages 2ndIdentity

Clues?

Edit: Polyface was my favorite part of that book.

Imagine4vr


quality posts: 22 Private Messages Imagine4vr
2ndIdentity wrote:Clues?

Edit: Polyface was my favorite part of that book.



I think it's already been spoiled. Tonight's offer will be whites, at least 1 Sauvignon Blanc, from the same winery.

ddeuddeg


quality posts: 26 Private Messages ddeuddeg
Imagine4vr wrote:I think it's already been spoiled. Tonight's offer will be whites, at least 1 Sauvignon Blanc, from the same winery.



IIRC, we got thrown off the track by a similar miscue once before.

"Always keep a bottle of Champagne in the fridge for special occasions. Sometimes the special occasion is that you've got a bottle of Champagne in the fridge". - Hester Browne


Ddeuddeg's Cheesecake Cookbook

2ndIdentity


quality posts: 0 Private Messages 2ndIdentity
Imagine4vr wrote:I think it's already been spoiled. Tonight's offer will be whites, at least 1 Sauvignon Blanc, from the same winery.



Thank you. I was just at Benziger last month and I got all I wanted for the year. Although, their Muscat is pretty delicious.