themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
winefarm wrote:TMR, please check you PM's.

WD


did do / responded. WE BE GOOD TO GO! for the rest of you:

I AM GOING TO BE A LABRAT!!!

WOOHOO!!! BUT, due to strange weather patterns off the coast of Madagascar having something to do with any one of the various tropical depressions & hurricanes currently plaguing or threatening to plague the 48 contiguous which have otherwise disrupted logistics as we know them (read: don't ask), i will NOT be receiving this lovely gift from WD & WF until Saturday. so that's when i'll be reporting back.

NOTE: oh, and tommy, as promised: I HEREBY DEDICATE MY UPCOMING LABRAT REPORT TO YOU!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

tommythecat78


quality posts: 18 Private Messages tommythecat78
themostrighteous wrote:did do / responded. WE BE GOOD TO GO! for the rest of you:

I AM GOING TO BE A LABRAT!!!

WOOHOO!!! BUT, due to strange weather patterns off the coast of Madagascar having something to do with any one of the various tropical depressions & hurricanes currently plaguing or threatening to plague the 48 contiguous which have otherwise disrupted logistics as we know them (read: don't ask), i will NOT be receiving this lovely gift from WD & WF until Saturday. so that's when i'll be reporting back.

NOTE: oh, and tommy, as promised: I HEREBY DEDICATE MY UPCOMING LABRAT REPORT TO YOU!


WOOO HOOO!!! Now what to do with my new found fame!!

___________________________________________________________________________________________
My Cellar (has not been updated in forever)
Do the people want fire that can be applied nasally? -Golgafrinchan Marketing Consultant

MaxAlex


quality posts: 0 Private Messages MaxAlex

I agree with you. I have had a few passes in a row and feel like I'm in deep withdrawls. I am a short timer and love to look at this sight throughout the day to see the interaction of wine lovers from all over the country. To whomever came up with this idea and work it behind the scene - Bravo!!!!!!!!!!!

wootvirgin69


quality posts: 2 Private Messages wootvirgin69
Jopo528 wrote:I had a dry riesling last friday with sushi; and if this is anything similar, it was amazing!



So are you finally going to make a purchase, or are you continuing to pass?

foobarski


quality posts: 2 Private Messages foobarski

"Indeed, Castello di Amorosa’s authenticity even extends to an authentic torture chamber, complete with iron maiden and other instruments of medieval persuasion. So not only is Dario Sattui the first winemaker to feature Gewürztraminer on Wine.Woot, he’s also the first to own a stretching rack.

Of course, it’s only there for atmosphere. Dario lives to make premium Italian-style wines, not to extract confessions from heretics. But still, if you post in our discussion forums, you might want to choose your words carefully this time."

Yes, but do they have ...

THE COMFY CHAIR???

"Is there anything a man don't stand to lose, when the devil wants to take it all away?
Cherish well your thoughts, and keep a tight grip on your booze.
Cause thinkin' and drinkin' are all I have today."
-- John Perry Barlow / Bob Weir ("Mexicali Blues")

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
themostrighteous wrote:just make sure you don't accidentally call it Tranny G.



Or Kenny G!

Wait, that'd be redundant wouldn't it

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
themostrighteous wrote:did do / responded. WE BE GOOD TO GO! for the rest of you:

I AM GOING TO BE A LABRAT!!!

WOOHOO!!! BUT, due to strange weather patterns off the coast of Madagascar having something to do with any one of the various tropical depressions & hurricanes currently plaguing or threatening to plague the 48 contiguous which have otherwise disrupted logistics as we know them (read: don't ask), i will NOT be receiving this lovely gift from WD & WF until Saturday. so that's when i'll be reporting back.

NOTE: oh, and tommy, as promised: I HEREBY DEDICATE MY UPCOMING LABRAT REPORT TO YOU!



Then I will await your report with baited breath. What does that mean anyway? If someones breath smelled like bait, I would not want to be around them, and could be why the pub clears when I get there...

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
bhodilee wrote:Then I will await your report with baited breath. What does that mean anyway? If someones breath smelled like bait, I would not want to be around them, and could be why the pub clears when I get there...


what does baited breath mean? dunno. certainly not the same as bated breath. but, yeah, as to why the Pub clears when you get there, it must be the former. cuz them wineaux be folks w/ sensitive noses yo.

do you know... what biodynamics is?

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
themostrighteous wrote:what does baited breath mean? dunno. certainly not the same as bated breath. but, yeah, as to why the Pub clears when you get there, it must be the former. cuz them wineaux be folks w/ sensitive noses yo.



Why must you taunt me with your ESL superiority

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

ScottHarveyWines


quality posts: 151 Private Messages ScottHarveyWines

Just got on and see that the Castello di Amorosa Gewurztraminer I bought a case of a couple of weeks ago is on. Since I have a few bottles left I can do an unofficial labrat report. The wine is dry, not mediuym dry, with a good Gewurztraminer varietal nose of Lychee nuts and apricot. It has a hint of citrus English hard candies and pear drops with linalool and a slight grassy or dill like Sauvignon Blanc nose. Gewurztraminer's natural bitterness if toned down, as it is in this wine, creates a nice complexity that can remind you of Sauvignon Blanc. I also get ginger, spearmint, saffron and passion friut. Seems to be made in a medium ripe style that gives you a little bit of buttered pop corn on the palate. The wine has no turpines that you would more likly find in a Riesling. The wine has good weight wich makes it accompany food well. I had it a couple of nights ago with a almond crusted Dover Sole in a lemon caper butter sause over crispy grilled spinach. Finished the whole bottle. Not to many good dry gewurztraminers out there. This is one of them.

LoonBoarder


quality posts: 5 Private Messages LoonBoarder
ScottHarveyWines wrote:Just got on and see that the Castello di Amorosa Gewurztraminer I bought a case of a couple of weeks ago is on. Since I have a few bottles left I can do an unofficial labrat report. The wine is dry, not mediuym dry, with a good Gewurztraminer varietal nose of Lychee nuts and apricot. It has a hint of citrus English hard candies and pear drops with linalool and a slight grassy or dill like Sauvignon Blanc nose. Gewurztraminer's natural bitterness if toned down, as it is in this wine, creates a nice complexity that can remind you of Sauvignon Blanc. I also get ginger, spearmint, saffron and passion friut. Seems to be made in a medium ripe style that gives you a little bit of buttered pop corn on the palate. The wine has no turpines that you would more likly find in a Riesling. The wine has good weight wich makes it accompany food well. I had it a couple of nights ago with a almond crusted Dover Sole in a lemon caper butter sause over crispy grilled spinach. Finished the whole bottle. Not to many good dry gewurztraminers out there. This is one of them.



Sold!

Dude... wait, what?

INTLGerard


quality posts: 58 Private Messages INTLGerard

Guest Blogger

bkarney wrote:What about Sushi (Wasabi!!!!!)? I eat a lot of it and it is often touch and go with red pairings... usually go with a Zin. I'm hoping this is what I've been waiting for that I didn't realize was out there.



I like the traditional pairing of richer food like duck pate/mousse or some smoked fish/poultry with an Alsace styled Gewurztraminer. Treat your guests to these apps with the Gewurz to get their palates pumped! With Sushi, I love a dry Riesling, a crisp New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc or sparkling wine which I find compliments the flavors much like cold Sake. Pairing red wines with sushi can be challenging. I like a softer fruit forward new world Pinot Noir with its low tannin, less alcohol and intensity to avoid overwhelming the sushi. With the PN though, I would use the wasabi sparingly, if at all, as it can mute the fruit and alter the flavors.
IMO…Bon Appetite!

Somehow that egg sandwich I have for lunch will not be the same. ;-p

smartheart


quality posts: 94 Private Messages smartheart
ScottHarveyWines wrote:Just got on and see that the Castello di Amorosa Gewurztraminer I bought a case of a couple of weeks ago is on. Since I have a few bottles left I can do an unofficial labrat report. The wine is dry, not mediuym dry, with a good Gewurztraminer varietal nose of Lychee nuts and apricot. It has a hint of citrus English hard candies and pear drops with linalool and a slight grassy or dill like Sauvignon Blanc nose. Gewurztraminer's natural bitterness if toned down, as it is in this wine, creates a nice complexity that can remind you of Sauvignon Blanc. I also get ginger, spearmint, saffron and passion friut. Seems to be made in a medium ripe style that gives you a little bit of buttered pop corn on the palate. The wine has no turpines that you would more likly find in a Riesling. The wine has good weight wich makes it accompany food well. I had it a couple of nights ago with a almond crusted Dover Sole in a lemon caper butter sause over crispy grilled spinach. Finished the whole bottle. Not to many good dry gewurztraminers out there. This is one of them.



Good report, Scott. Was going to sit this one out as I don't favor still whites but you've made it sound very appealing, and I might take the plunge based on your recommendation.

Meanwhile, looking forward to the arrival of your InZINerator !


"Three be the things I shall never attain: Envy, content, and sufficient champagne."
--D. Parker

CastellodiAmorosa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages CastellodiAmorosa
ScottHarveyWines wrote:Just got on and see that the Castello di Amorosa Gewurztraminer I bought a case of a couple of weeks ago is on. Since I have a few bottles left I can do an unofficial labrat report. The wine is dry, not mediuym dry, with a good Gewurztraminer varietal nose of Lychee nuts and apricot. It has a hint of citrus English hard candies and pear drops with linalool and a slight grassy or dill like Sauvignon Blanc nose. Gewurztraminer's natural bitterness if toned down, as it is in this wine, creates a nice complexity that can remind you of Sauvignon Blanc. I also get ginger, spearmint, saffron and passion friut. Seems to be made in a medium ripe style that gives you a little bit of buttered pop corn on the palate. The wine has no turpines that you would more likly find in a Riesling. The wine has good weight wich makes it accompany food well. I had it a couple of nights ago with a almond crusted Dover Sole in a lemon caper butter sause over crispy grilled spinach. Finished the whole bottle. Not to many good dry gewurztraminers out there. This is one of them.



CastellodiAmorosa


quality posts: 0 Private Messages CastellodiAmorosa
ScottHarveyWines wrote:Just got on and see that the Castello di Amorosa Gewurztraminer I bought a case of a couple of weeks ago is on. Since I have a few bottles left I can do an unofficial labrat report. The wine is dry, not mediuym dry, with a good Gewurztraminer varietal nose of Lychee nuts and apricot. It has a hint of citrus English hard candies and pear drops with linalool and a slight grassy or dill like Sauvignon Blanc nose. Gewurztraminer's natural bitterness if toned down, as it is in this wine, creates a nice complexity that can remind you of Sauvignon Blanc. I also get ginger, spearmint, saffron and passion friut. Seems to be made in a medium ripe style that gives you a little bit of buttered pop corn on the palate. The wine has no turpines that you would more likly find in a Riesling. The wine has good weight wich makes it accompany food well. I had it a couple of nights ago with a almond crusted Dover Sole in a lemon caper butter sause over crispy grilled spinach. Finished the whole bottle. Not to many good dry gewurztraminers out there. This is one of them.



Thank you for your comments and glad you enjoyed the wine! Our wines are made to be paired with food. Our Gewurztraminer is just one example of a great wine that pairs with many different foods.

woopdedoo


quality posts: 35 Private Messages woopdedoo
bhodilee wrote:Then I will await your report with baited breath. What does that mean anyway? If someones breath smelled like bait, I would not want to be around them, and could be why the pub clears when I get there...



"The correct spelling is actually bated breath but it’s so common these days to see it written as baited breath that there’s every chance that it will soon become the usual form, to the disgust of conservative speakers and the confusion of dictionary writers. Examples in newspapers and magazines are legion; this one appeared in the Daily Mirror on 12 April 2003: “She hasn’t responded yet but Michael is waiting with baited breath”.

It’s easy to mock, but there’s a real problem here. Bated and baited sound the same and we no longer use bated (let alone the verb to bate), outside this one set phrase, which has become an idiom. Confusion is almost inevitable. Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel (a process called aphesis); it means “reduced, lessened, lowered in force”. So bated breath refers to a state in which you almost stop breathing as a result of some strong emotion, such as terror or awe."

mathiusr1


quality posts: 1 Private Messages mathiusr1
woopdedoo wrote:"The correct spelling is actually bated breath but it’s so common these days to see it written as baited breath that there’s every chance that it will soon become the usual form, to the disgust of conservative speakers and the confusion of dictionary writers. Examples in newspapers and magazines are legion; this one appeared in the Daily Mirror on 12 April 2003: “She hasn’t responded yet but Michael is waiting with baited breath”.

It’s easy to mock, but there’s a real problem here. Bated and baited sound the same and we no longer use bated (let alone the verb to bate), outside this one set phrase, which has become an idiom. Confusion is almost inevitable. Bated here is a contraction of abated through loss of the unstressed first vowel (a process called aphesis); it means “reduced, lessened, lowered in force”. So bated breath refers to a state in which you almost stop breathing as a result of some strong emotion, such as terror or awe."



ahhh its "Bated".....that phrase has always confused me....why would someone bait there breath?

hello, hi.

kylemittskus


quality posts: 229 Private Messages kylemittskus
mathiusr1 wrote:ahhh its "Bated".....that phrase has always confused me....why would someone bait there breath?



It's interesting because the phrase, "baited breath" would also makes sense. As in, you have been baited and waiting for something. Just something that I have always found intriguing.

WineDavid, in spite of the fact that there is no evidence that requesting, begging, or otherwise coaxing you has any effect at all, I am going to request, that sometime in the distant future, we see Chase again, but this time, with their port. PLEASE!

"If drinking is bitter, change yourself to wine." -Rainer Maria Rilke

"Champagne is a very kind and friendly thing on a rainy night." -Isak Dinesen

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
ScottHarveyWines wrote:Just got on and see that the Castello di Amorosa Gewurztraminer I bought a case of a couple of weeks ago is on. Since I have a few bottles left I can do an unofficial labrat report. The wine is dry, not mediuym dry, with a good Gewurztraminer varietal nose of Lychee nuts and apricot. It has a hint of citrus English hard candies and pear drops with linalool and a slight grassy or dill like Sauvignon Blanc nose. Gewurztraminer's natural bitterness if toned down, as it is in this wine, creates a nice complexity that can remind you of Sauvignon Blanc. I also get ginger, spearmint, saffron and passion friut. Seems to be made in a medium ripe style that gives you a little bit of buttered pop corn on the palate. The wine has no turpines that you would more likly find in a Riesling. The wine has good weight wich makes it accompany food well. I had it a couple of nights ago with a almond crusted Dover Sole in a lemon caper butter sause over crispy grilled spinach. Finished the whole bottle. Not to many good dry gewurztraminers out there. This is one of them.


and i'm supposed to follow THAT act?!?

do you know... what biodynamics is?

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
kylemittskus wrote:It's interesting because the phrase, "baited breath" would also makes sense. As in, you have been baited and waiting for something. Just something that I have always found intriguing.

WineDavid, in spite of the fact that there is no evidence that requesting, begging, or otherwise coaxing you has any effect at all, I am going to request, that sometime in the distant future, we see Chase again, but this time, with their port. PLEASE!


PSquishy, in the future you might want to make that kind of request in the Pub or by PM, as opposed to here where the spotlight is on the current offering. just some friendly advice. peace.

do you know... what biodynamics is?

BobboinAVL


quality posts: 0 Private Messages BobboinAVL
ScottHarveyWines wrote:Just got on and see that the Castello di Amorosa Gewurztraminer I bought a case of a couple of weeks ago is on. Since I have a few bottles left I can do an unofficial labrat report. The wine is dry, not mediuym dry, with a good Gewurztraminer varietal nose of Lychee nuts and apricot. It has a hint of citrus English hard candies and pear drops with linalool and a slight grassy or dill like Sauvignon Blanc nose. Gewurztraminer's natural bitterness if toned down, as it is in this wine, creates a nice complexity that can remind you of Sauvignon Blanc. I also get ginger, spearmint, saffron and passion friut. Seems to be made in a medium ripe style that gives you a little bit of buttered pop corn on the palate. The wine has no turpines that you would more likly find in a Riesling. The wine has good weight wich makes it accompany food well. I had it a couple of nights ago with a almond crusted Dover Sole in a lemon caper butter sause over crispy grilled spinach. Finished the whole bottle. Not to many good dry gewurztraminers out there. This is one of them.



I'm in for one. Thanks SH!

andyduncan


quality posts: 32 Private Messages andyduncan
woopdedoo wrote:... this one appeared in the Daily Mirror on 12 April 2003: “She hasn’t responded yet but Michael is waiting with baited breath”



I just figured he'd eaten a breath mint as bait, hoping that her response would be a big wet smooch.

Obsessing about grammar always struck me as annoyingly quixotic.

I'm putting WD's kids through college.

coynedj


quality posts: 7 Private Messages coynedj
andyduncan wrote:Obsessing about grammar always struck me as annoyingly quixotic.



Which can lead directly to the next debate - why we "tilt" at windmills!

I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff. Bob Dylan, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues

How on earth did I get 7 QPs?

woopdedoo


quality posts: 35 Private Messages woopdedoo
coynedj wrote:Which can lead directly to the next debate - why we "tilt" at windmills!



"Tilting at windmills is an English idiom which means attacking imaginary enemies, or fighting otherwise-unwinable battles. The word “tilt,” here, comes from jousting."

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
woopdedoo wrote:"Tilting at windmills is an English idiom which means attacking imaginary enemies, or fighting otherwise-unwinable battles. The word “tilt,” here, comes from jousting."


ahh, yes, Molinos. we can thank Cervantes for this idiom. even if he didn't speak a word of English.

do you know... what biodynamics is?

wootvirgin69


quality posts: 2 Private Messages wootvirgin69
woopdedoo wrote:"Tilting at windmills is an English idiom which means attacking imaginary enemies, or fighting otherwise-unwinable battles. The word “tilt,” here, comes from jousting."



Damn dude, you are henceforth known as WikiWoop.

themostrighteous


quality posts: 12 Private Messages themostrighteous
wootvirgin69 wrote:Damn dude, you are henceforth known as WikiWoop.


or WoopDaWiki!

do you know... what biodynamics is?

psmurf


quality posts: 1 Private Messages psmurf

I'd post this question on the Wellington Select 3 thread but it might not get read(or answered), and any answers could apply to this and other future offerings(red or white).
My order(3 each of the Wellington 2006 Noir de Noirs, Syrah, and Grenache) arrived yesterday. I checked temps of a few bottles- about 80F, and everything looked fine(no ketchup ice packets incl).
Took the box home, chilled a Grenache in the fridge to about 57F, and poured into a cheap decanter.
Poured about 5 oz (about 60F now)into a glass, swirled around, and smelled... a somewhat slight vinegar scent came first. I really didn't smell fruit(I tried), but I am a newbie.
Finally I took a sip, and again a very slight vinegar taste. Then tartness and unexplainable tastes/odors... but again I am a newbie not knowing what to expect.
After 3 more short glasses of this my SO(not a wine drinker) finally agreed to try it. Scenting, her first remark was vinegar(I did not tell her about my first scent- I wanted to hear hers without influence).
I asked her to sip now. She did and replied she wouldn't drink that ----, so I finished her glass off. Later that night I asked her to smell my glass, and if she noticed any blueberry or raspberry scents. She did say yes- blueberries(but vinegar).
Is a vinegar scent(not too strong) characteristic of this wine? I have researched this but not really coming up with anything concrete.
I'm not dishonest or want to request a replacement if the order(9 bottles @ $175) is alright, so any advice will be appreciated.
I don't mind keeping a wine(the others) that I didn't particularly enjoy(and might later), but curious if maybe I got a bad one... or maybe the entire order??
(I actually tasted/smelled last nights experience all morning today)
I'm about ready to decant a 2006 Noir de Noirs, and see what happens there.
Please advise because I'm trying to become a good fine wine drinker... gotta start somewhere.

"If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice."
Neil Peart(of Rush)

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98
psmurf wrote:I'd post this question on the Wellington Select 3 thread but it might not get read(or answered), and any answers could apply to this and other future offerings(red or white).
My order(3 each of the Wellington 2006 Noir de Noirs, Syrah, and Grenache) arrived yesterday. I checked temps of a few bottles- about 80F, and everything looked fine(no ketchup ice packets incl).
Took the box home, chilled a Grenache in the fridge to about 57F, and poured into a cheap decanter.
Poured about 5 oz (about 60F now)into a glass, swirled around, and smelled... a somewhat slight vinegar scent came first. I really didn't smell fruit(I tried), but I am a newbie.
Finally I took a sip, and again a very slight vinegar taste. Then tartness and unexplainable tastes/odors... but again I am a newbie not knowing what to expect.
After 3 more short glasses of this my SO(not a wine drinker) finally agreed to try it. Scenting, her first remark was vinegar(I did not tell her about my first scent- I wanted to hear hers without influence).
I asked her to sip now. She did and replied she wouldn't drink that ----, so I finished her glass off. Later that night I asked her to smell my glass, and if she noticed any blueberry or raspberry scents. She did say yes- blueberries(but vinegar).
Is a vinegar scent(not too strong) characteristic of this wine? I have researched this but not really coming up with anything concrete.
I'm not dishonest or want to request a replacement if the order(9 bottles @ $175) is alright, so any advice will be appreciated.
I don't mind keeping a wine(the others) that I didn't particularly enjoy(and might later), but curious if maybe I got a bad one... or maybe the entire order??
(I actually tasted/smelled last nights experience all morning today)
I'm about ready to decant a 2006 Noir de Noirs, and see what happens there.
Please advise because I'm trying to become a good fine wine drinker... gotta start somewhere.



There's a controversial theory floating about called "bottle shock", which I happen to subscribe to. It's entirely possible that what you're experiencing is indeed bottle shock, if you just received the wine today and drank it tonight. It's usually considered to be a better idea to put the wine away somewhere still for a few days after receipt before drinking it, to let the wine 'recover' from its perilous trip across the country.

Let it all rest. Try another bottle in a few days and see if it's any better. Vinegar is not exactly what you want in a wine, and 80 degrees isn't really warm enough to consider the wine 'cooked'.

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

psmurf


quality posts: 1 Private Messages psmurf
cheron98 wrote:There's a controversial theory floating about called "bottle shock", which I happen to subscribe to. It's entirely possible that what you're experiencing is indeed bottle shock, if you just received the wine today and drank it tonight. It's usually considered to be a better idea to put the wine away somewhere still for a few days after receipt before drinking it, to let the wine 'recover' from its perilous trip across the country.

Let it all rest. Try another bottle in a few days and see if it's any better. Vinegar is not exactly what you want in a wine, and 80 degrees isn't really warm enough to consider the wine 'cooked'.



I guess the labrats consider the "bottle shock" when reviewing?... just wondering.
I just cracked the Nior De Noirs and at about 58F... no vinegar scent or taste, a little tartness(not over whelming), and much better... and this time- some fruits(not sure which) and other scents?? Much better and a purple tongue...hehe.
This won't be finished tonight(wasn't decanted- straight out the bottle), so I'll re-cork it and finish tomorrow.
Thanks cheron for the quick reply... maybe the next Grenache(still a bad taste in my mouth after the first one) will be better- although that might be a while?

"If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice."
Neil Peart(of Rush)

hld1970


quality posts: 16 Private Messages hld1970
kylemittskus wrote:It's interesting because the phrase, "baited breath" would also makes sense. As in, you have been baited and waiting for something. Just something that I have always found intriguing.

WineDavid, in spite of the fact that there is no evidence that requesting, begging, or otherwise coaxing you has any effect at all, I am going to request, that sometime in the distant future, we see Chase again, but this time, with their port. PLEASE!



Amen, Brother! Let's do it/ see it!

______________________________________________
"My only regret in life is that I didn't drink more wine." --Hemingway

wootvirgin69


quality posts: 2 Private Messages wootvirgin69

*SIGH* I caved. In for one on the Gewurz. This marks 6 offerings in a row for me. Official sign of trouble. Pharmaceuticals? Counseling? Manos, the Hands of Fate, I'll just open a bottle...

hld1970


quality posts: 16 Private Messages hld1970
andyduncan wrote:I just figured he'd eaten a breath mint as bait, hoping that her response would be a big wet smooch.

Obsessing about grammar always struck me as annoyingly quixotic.



I think it has more to do with the British way of spelling, i.e. parlour, etc.

______________________________________________
"My only regret in life is that I didn't drink more wine." --Hemingway

hld1970


quality posts: 16 Private Messages hld1970
wootvirgin69 wrote:*SIGH* I caved. In for one on the Gewurz. This marks 6 offerings in a row for me. Official sign of trouble. Pharmaceuticals? Counseling? Manos, the Hands of Fate, I'll just open a bottle...



Kudos on your hot streak. What's even more impressive is your colored box, considering when you joined.

______________________________________________
"My only regret in life is that I didn't drink more wine." --Hemingway

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98
psmurf wrote:I guess the labrats consider the "bottle shock" when reviewing?... just wondering.
I just cracked the Nior De Noirs and at about 58F... no vinegar scent or taste, a little tartness(not over whelming), and much better... and this time- some fruits(not sure which) and other scents?? Much better and a purple tongue...hehe.
This won't be finished tonight(wasn't decanted- straight out the bottle), so I'll re-cork it and finish tomorrow.
Thanks cheron for the quick reply... maybe the next Grenache(still a bad taste in my mouth after the first one) will be better- although that might be a while?



I think the quick shipping for labrats isn't enough time for bottle shock to set in, honestly. You get it overnight, so there's not nearly as much movement and handling time. It's just the regular shipments that take multiple days to get to their destination that get subjected to it. More check-in points = more handling = more opportunity for shock.

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

wootvirgin69


quality posts: 2 Private Messages wootvirgin69
hld1970 wrote:Kudos on your hot streak. What's even more impressive is your colored box, considering when you joined.



You know, for some time now, I've been looking for a good source of quality wines to sample. As some folks have seen, I've asked about a really good quality wine club, but you invariably get swill that you just don't llike. This has turned into my wine club from which I get to pick and choose exactly what I want. Problem is, I've been picking everything, as every single offering I've received is of really great quality. Can you say, HOOKED?

Speaking of which, can you translate for me what, exactly, the colored boxes mean??

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98
wootvirgin69 wrote:You know, for some time now, I've been looking for a good source of quality wines to sample. As some folks have seen, I've asked about a really good quality wine club, but you invariably get swill that you just don't llike. This has turned into my wine club from which I get to pick and choose exactly what I want. Problem is, I've been picking everything, as every single offering I've received is of really great quality. Can you say, HOOKED?

Speaking of which, can you translate for me what, exactly, the colored boxes mean??



It's the number of woots you've purchased. If you mouse-over them, they'll tell you.

Clear = no woots
Orange = 1 woot
Burnt Orange = 2 woots
Blue = 3-10 woots
Brown (like yours) = 11 - 25 woots
Black = > 25 woots, and you're better than everyone else.

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

SmilingBoognish


quality posts: 46 Private Messages SmilingBoognish
INTLGerard wrote:With Sushi, I love a dry Riesling, a crisp New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc or sparkling wine which I find compliments the flavors much like cold Sake. Pairing red wines with sushi can be challenging.



The wife and I get sushi at least a couple times a week. We frequently drink NZ S.Blanc with our sushi dinners, which is good, and I'm anxious to open some bubbly with it per the advice of those on this board. Having said that, I have very much enjoyed cab, zin or a big merlot with salmon and ahi sashimi. To generalize "sushi" is a bit of an over simplification, imho. YMMV.

deaconbluez


quality posts: 1 Private Messages deaconbluez

Last wooter to woot: deaconbluez

Damn, this buying twice a week is going to break me! But I love a dry Gewurtz and couldn't pass on this. They are hard to find in my neck of the woods.

"I prefer a thief to a Congressman. A thief will take your money and be on his way, but a Congressman will stand there and bore you with the reasons why he took it." -Dr. Williams

clayfu


quality posts: 10 Private Messages clayfu
cheron98 wrote:There's a controversial theory floating about called "bottle shock", which I happen to subscribe to. It's entirely possible that what you're experiencing is indeed bottle shock, if you just received the wine today and drank it tonight. It's usually considered to be a better idea to put the wine away somewhere still for a few days after receipt before drinking it, to let the wine 'recover' from its perilous trip across the country.

Let it all rest. Try another bottle in a few days and see if it's any better. Vinegar is not exactly what you want in a wine, and 80 degrees isn't really warm enough to consider the wine 'cooked'.


i'm not sure how I never got around to replying to the bottle shock theory, but I think bottle transport gets massively overplayed. You gotta shake that thing pretty massively for quite a while. (especially on wines that you're supposed to shake in bottle?) It's like people afraid of the vibrations in the fridge.

of course I do believe wines don't show that great right when bottled, but most of the time we never even get the opportunity.