bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
coynedj wrote:Yikes! Me too! Just got home from work to find it gone!

I guess I'll never get to experience the wonders of true BV that so many have waxed on about....sniff.....it's woot or nothing for me.......



yes, it's waxed off

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

canonizer


quality posts: 22 Private Messages canonizer
speedoo wrote:I think so, but I was referring to another offer that sold out way early, and he got together with the winery or whoever, to come up with a new offer. My recollection is very vague, I could easily be wrong.



I think the FFC offer is the one you're referring to.

signed.

winefarm


quality posts: 7 Private Messages winefarm
bhodilee wrote:You guys should just buy a second home here, my state treats you well



The commute might be rough . Guess we missed the big storm by a day, huh. Good thing the Qwest Center held up. By the looks of all the records being broken, it was a fast pool. WD and I have a family friend swimming in China. Everybody root for Elaine Breeden in the Butterfly.

Just checked and the Early Girls are turning!

Happy Weekend, everyone. Enjoy the Balsamic.



likesstuff


quality posts: 4 Private Messages likesstuff

Well DANG! I don't check in one morning and miss THIS??? I'm on a WineWoot diet but you never know when something great is going to come up. (I joined up for that blue cheese offering last year...) Real vintage BV is something very special.

Cesare


quality posts: 1564 Private Messages Cesare
bhodilee wrote:In one day, less than one day. That's freaking crazy, we've had wine that cost this much that didn't move this fast, decent wine at that. I think we'll be seeing this company again. Five Liter Olive Oil please Only oil I cook with, cept for baking, but I do use it in a lot of breads.



Remember, this was able to ship to all states. That's a big reason. Wines usually have what- 20 states listed? Maybe a little more sometimes. Also there was no age restriction on this so I'm sure there were some wooters who bought this as gifts for their parents or whatever or even for themselves who knows.

-il Cesare
Sole Absolute Triple
Exalted High Tastemaster Supreme
“In the entire world there are only a few sounds that bring joy to all but the most jaded. One is the murmur of a kitten purring. Another is the thwack of a well-pitched baseball hitting a perfectly swung bat. And the third is the pop of a cork being pulled from a bottle of wine.” —George Taber

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
winefarm wrote:The commute might be rough . Guess we missed the big storm by a day, huh. Good thing the Qwest Center held up. By the looks of all the records being broken, it was a fast pool. WD and I have a family friend swimming in China. Everybody root for Elaine Breeden in the Butterfly.

Just checked and the Early Girls are turning!

Happy Weekend, everyone. Enjoy the Balsamic.



Uh yeah, that storm sucked just a little bit. The pool was fast, but I think it was the suits. They talked all week about these new suits and records were just getting crushed so there may have been something to it. And yes, the commute would not be fun. I will root for Elaine Breeden, though I don't recognize the name from Omaha. I'm sure she was here though yes?

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bleemer420


quality posts: 0 Private Messages bleemer420
winefarm wrote:Okay, if I start talking about warming the soil, shoot me.

My chicken farmer friend used chicken manure in one field and cow manure in the other and the tomatoes in the chicken field performed much better. 1800 chickens sounds like a few too many



1800 chickens sounds like a lot but one normal size broiler house 40 X 400 holds 20K chickens. Most SMALL chicken farms have appox. 2 to 6 houses. A dozen eggs wholesale brings the farmer about .12 cents. The only crop a small time farmer can turn a profit on is illegal, weed..... Big Biz has ran us into the ground.... Support your local farmers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Also about 70% of produce in the supermarket is imported.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
Cesare wrote:Remember, this was able to ship to all states. That's a big reason. Wines usually have what- 20 states listed? Maybe a little more sometimes. Also there was no age restriction on this so I'm sure there were some wooters who bought this as gifts for their parents or whatever or even for themselves who knows.



True, adding 30ish states has to help a lot. I'm just sad cause I missed it, though I hadn't planned to buy until Sunday if it was still around. I do that, if I want it I wait til Sunday and if it's available, it was meant to be. Karma, all that carp. Basically I give everyone else a chance to force me to save my money. You all need to do a better job of that buy (pun) the way

bleemer420 wrote:1800 chickens sounds like a lot but one normal size broiler house 40 X 400 holds 20K chickens. Most SMALL chicken farms have appox. 2 to 6 houses. A dozen eggs wholesale brings the farmer about .12 cents. The only crop a small time farmer can turn a profit on is illegal, weed..... Big Biz has ran us into the ground.... Support your local farmers!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Also about 70% of produce in the supermarket is imported.



Which is why I only buy supermarket produce in the dead of winter, when I cant get anything here. Though I tend to load up on squashes in fall and eat them throughout the winter. Sweetcorn is just starting to go up for sale here. I'm stopping on the way home to get a dozen ears for dinner, by which I mean I'm having corn for dinner and nothing else.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98
boaz38 wrote:uhhhh, does anyone know when the next wine selection will be up for sale? WD?



Well, given we didn't get something new today, and it's Friday, I'd say we're stuck looking at the "SOLD OUT!" image until Monday (Sunday night for you west coasters). That's typically the way it works over here - items go up for sale on Monday at midnight CST, and if WD is feeling generous and we're lucky, we get a second offering on Thursday at midnight CST. Nothing after that though. The only time we've gotten more during a week is if there's been an oops in inventory control, or if they specifically plan a three-offering week (Rock Hollow, anyone?). But hey, come visit us in the CyberPub if you're bored! Make sure you start on page 1.

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

dianefreda


quality posts: 9 Private Messages dianefreda
bhodilee wrote:yes, it's waxed off



Me too- I went home last night and tried roasting some asparagus with olive oil (on a baking stone) with sea salt and cracked pepper and drizzling some balsamic viniger on them right before serving. It was wonderful, so much so I decided to try some of the really good balsamic only to find it gone.

KelbyG


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KelbyG

I remember a dessert recipe for the REALLY expensive Balsamic Vinegars that I saw on PBS. The chef took a chunk of Parmesan cheese (off of a block, not grated), poured some of the good stuff on top, and ate it like a piece of cheese cake. As simple as that. The chef said he paid $150 for the little bottle he had. I was blown away by this. I saw this about 7 yrs ago and it had to be the first time I ever heard of Balsamic Vinegar.

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98
cheron98 wrote:I apologize, and am saddened and dismayed... I can't find it, which means I probably used the last of it at some point and never got around to getting more and forgot I needed to get more. So I'll have to go hunting around and try to find it again.



So if anyone cares x-posted from pub:

So I tried 4 different stores around here and got super ticked off that World Market closed up since that's where I got my BV last time, and finally in semi-desperation and fear that I wasn't ratted and require BV for tonight, picked up a little bottle from Hiller's. It's not the BV I USUALLY get. Which makes me sad. But it's not too bad - I popped it open in the car and took a little sip. It's sweet and pleasant on the nose with just barely an acrid tinge to it. Little bit of must and something close to a slightly souring merlot across the palate, with a nice long finish of concord grape. Think Welch's grape juice. But not quite as strong or mouth-puckering. But the flavoring, for sure. Fairly decent stuff for $10.99 (250ml bottle).

Alessi 20-year aged VSOP Balsamic Vinegar


Now mind you, this is probably about as close to "high quality" as you'll find in a standard grocery store, but it's not as good as what the usual is (which may no longer be my usual unless I can find another World Market around here), and I'm sure it'll be blown away by the BV offered here. But for $11... not bad.

Oh yeah... the Alessi blows away the Costco one I've got, for sure

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

speedoo


quality posts: 41 Private Messages speedoo
KelbyG wrote:I remember a dessert recipe for the REALLY expensive Balsamic Vinegars that I saw on PBS. The chef took a chunk of Parmesan cheese (off of a block, not grated), poured some of the good stuff on top, and ate it like a piece of cheese cake. As simple as that. The chef said he paid $150 for the little bottle he had. I was blown away by this. I saw this about 7 yrs ago and it had to be the first time I ever heard of Balsamic Vinegar.



Can't get much simpler than that, huh? Once you get the $$$$ BV, that is. I assume the Parmesan was choice, as well,

pagreen


quality posts: 8 Private Messages pagreen

For those of you fretting over missing the boat, here is a surprising excerpt from an article in Cooks Illustrated:

Is there a way to mimic the robust flavor of aged balsamic vinegar?

Traditionally produced balsamic vinegar (labeled tradizionale) is used sparingly for drizzling or flavoring—never in salad dressings or vinaigrettes. It can also take over 25 years to produce and cost up to $60 per ounce. We wanted to find a way to reproduce some of the drizzle-worthy qualities of traditional balsamic without having to visit a specialty food store or a loan officer.

We started with a decent supermarket balsamic vinegar and tried reducing it with sugar and flavorings ranging from black currant juice to coffee. In the end, we found that a straight reduction of 1/3 cup of vinegar and 1 tablespoon of sugar worked well enough, but the addition of 1 tablespoon of port added the complexity we were after. Vigorous boiling destroyed nuances in the vinegar's flavor; the best results came from reducing this mixture for 30 to 40 minutes over extremely low heat (barely simmering) to about half of its original volume. While most tasters could distinguish this reduction from a traditional, 12-year-old balsamic, our homemade drizzling vinegar was surprisingly good. The flavor is very strong, so use sparingly over fresh fruit, ice cream, or grilled meats and fish.


I've never tried it, but then, I don't have to because I did order in time. () Just kidding. Actually, I may try it so that I can do a comparison.

speedoo


quality posts: 41 Private Messages speedoo
pagreen wrote:For those of you fretting over missing the boat, here is a surprising excerpt from an article in Cooks Illustrated:

Is there a way to mimic the robust flavor of aged balsamic vinegar?

Traditionally produced balsamic vinegar (labeled tradizionale) is used sparingly for drizzling or flavoring—never in salad dressings or vinaigrettes. It can also take over 25 years to produce and cost up to $60 per ounce. We wanted to find a way to reproduce some of the drizzle-worthy qualities of traditional balsamic without having to visit a specialty food store or a loan officer.

We started with a decent supermarket balsamic vinegar and tried reducing it with sugar and flavorings ranging from black currant juice to coffee. In the end, we found that a straight reduction of 1/3 cup of vinegar and 1 tablespoon of sugar worked well enough, but the addition of 1 tablespoon of port added the complexity we were after. Vigorous boiling destroyed nuances in the vinegar's flavor; the best results came from reducing this mixture for 30 to 40 minutes over extremely low heat (barely simmering) to about half of its original volume. While most tasters could distinguish this reduction from a traditional, 12-year-old balsamic, our homemade drizzling vinegar was surprisingly good. The flavor is very strong, so use sparingly over fresh fruit, ice cream, or grilled meats and fish.


I've never tried it, but then, I don't have to because I did order in time. () Just kidding. Actually, I may try it so that I can do a comparison.



Excellent find! Cooks Illustrated rocks, doesn't it?

Putting that on my list of things to try.

soundwave106


quality posts: 0 Private Messages soundwave106
KelbyG wrote:I remember a dessert recipe for the REALLY expensive Balsamic Vinegars that I saw on PBS. The chef took a chunk of Parmesan cheese (off of a block, not grated), poured some of the good stuff on top, and ate it like a piece of cheese cake. As simple as that.



One of the BV bottles I have, Cavalli Gold Seal, is exactly like that. The Cavalli is an example of an "aceto balsamico tradizionale" types. It's very thick, drizzle type balsamic. Very very expensive, but it goes a very long way. Definitely good for desserts, and for sauces sometimes (as long as the balsamic is allowed to shine through).

My everday balsamic tends to be the Manicardi #12. This is (from all I know) a blended variety (old + young balsamic, maybe some wine vinegar too). It's a lot thinner, and that's fine for some applications (salads and cooking, for me). It's a step up from the wine-vinegar-with-food-coloring varieties that you can find for real cheap in grocery stores.

I will be curious how this one compares. Based on age I suspect that this isn't like the Cavalli at all. But it's probably a step up from the Manicardi, maybe a bit more pure and not blended. It's difficult finding a lot of good information and reviews on balsamic for some reason.

coynedj


quality posts: 7 Private Messages coynedj
pagreen wrote:We started with a decent supermarket balsamic vinegar and tried reducing it with sugar and flavorings ranging from black currant juice to coffee. In the end, we found that a straight reduction of 1/3 cup of vinegar and 1 tablespoon of sugar worked well enough, but the addition of 1 tablespoon of port added the complexity we were after. Vigorous boiling destroyed nuances in the vinegar's flavor; the best results came from reducing this mixture for 30 to 40 minutes over extremely low heat (barely simmering) to about half of its original volume. While most tasters could distinguish this reduction from a traditional, 12-year-old balsamic, our homemade drizzling vinegar was surprisingly good. The flavor is very strong, so use sparingly over fresh fruit, ice cream, or grilled meats and fish. [/i]

I've never tried it, but then, I don't have to because I did order in time. () Just kidding. Actually, I may try it so that I can do a comparison.



Please do, and report back. I missed this offering and really wanted to try some of the recipes people have given here - being able to even get in the neighborhood of the real BV taste without the real BV price would be fantastic!

I started out on Burgundy but soon hit the harder stuff. Bob Dylan, Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues

How on earth did I get 7 QPs?

jammele


quality posts: 0 Private Messages jammele

LABRAT REVIEW: Hooray!! My first chance to be a labrat!! I was so excited to see the bottle arrive in the mail today. And, I am just as happy that it is for vinegar as I would be if it were wine. That is the beauty of being Italian.

I compared the Cavedoni Botte Piccola Italian Balsamic to two other bottles of balsamic I have at home (I like vinegar, ok!?!). The first was a more expensive Napa Valley Harvest balsamic – which says it is 100% barrel aged balsamic vinegar from Modena - and the second was the typical cheaper kind you get at the store - Monari Federzoni.

First, compared to the Monari, the Cavedoni held up very well. Sweeter, less acidic in smell and taste, and much thicker. Though not syrupy, the Cavedoni is clearly a thicker liquid than the Monari. Like your average cheap balsamic, the Monari can make your eyes water if you try to drink it. The Cavedoni was easier to sip.

However, compared to the Napa Valley, I found the Cavedoni harsher, less sweet, and more acidic. It had a more overpowering “herbal” smell versus the more fruity smelling Napa. The Cavedoni also tasted and smelled more oaky (and not in a good way) than the Napa, which was also barrel aged. Unlike the always sweet Napa, the Cavedoni had a noticeable aftertaste and bitterness. Note that the Napa was aged 18 years, while the Cavedoni was aged only 7, which may be the difference.

Final thoughts – the Cavedoni is much better than the average crud you get at the store which is good for salads but not much else. But, it’s not the classic balsamic that you can put on ice cream. It will go excellently on food, and would be very enjoyable on tomatoes or on grilled vegetables. For those of you who are uninitiated in the great balsamics, the Cavedoni may not quite sell you on the difference between good and sublime, but it would certainly get you closer. For a gift, the Cavedoni is a great choice. It comes in a nice box, is in a beautiful bottle, and comes with a pour spout. All nice touches.

And, just to make clear that I am not crazy, I had my best taste testers check it out – my 10 year old son and my 8 year old daughter.
Their thoughts on the Napa: sweeter, more vanilla flavor, with a sour and creamy aftertaste
Their thoughts on the Cavedoni : more wine tasting and sour, with a sweeter aftertaste
They both preferred the Napa, particularly if, as my son says, you don’t like wine-taste in the vinegar. My daughter said that the Cavedoni was good, just not as good as the other one. So, they agreed with me. And I didn’t coach them – I promise.

kmeyersvt


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kmeyersvt

I won Labrat this week! I was so very excited to see the box sitting on my desk when I came out of a meeting this afternoon! Of course, then I found out it was sold out, so I don't even know who is going to read this, but here I go.

Because Corrado is the one who told me about it and gave me the labrat email address, I had to invite him and his wife over to dinner tonight to labrat with me. We used the balsamic three ways: on bruschetta, on vanilla ice cream with fresh local strawberries and raspberries, and by itself.

By itself, there are clear notes of brown sugar which are balanced very nicely with the mild acidity of the vinegar. I do love balsamic and have a very nice non-aged bottle that I use frequently. It was surprising to me how little of the acid was left at 7 years of aging. The sweetness was certainly there but balanced immediately with the acidity for a very pleasant flavor combination.

On Bruschetta it was heavenly. I usually make my bruschetta (tomato, basil, garilic and olive oil) with regular balsamic, so this aged balsamic was a definite step up. The sweetness of the balsamic toned down some of the bite of the fresh garlic I'd infused into the olive oil and enhanced the flavor of the first local tomatoes I've had this year. Corrado also enjoyed it on just plain garlic oil and toasted bread. I can't wait to get some more local tomatoes to have some more bruschetta. I may be eating it for dinner every night this week!

Then, on to the ice cream. I had to try it even though I was a bit skeptical (my husband was not brave enough to put vinegar on his ice cream). On the Ben and Jerry's vanilla with fresh sliced local strawberries and raspberries, it was surprising yet again. I think the tartness of the unsweetened fruit absorbed the acidity of the vinegar because I got no acidity in that delicious bowl of dessert. It was very enjoyable.

The bottle comes beautifully packaged including a cork with a drizzling spout which works beautifully. If there were any left for all of you to buy, I would heartily recommend it! Too bad it's sold out ...

Thank you WineDavid for the Golden Ticket and the chance to enjoy this balsamic ahead of everyone else. When this bottle is gone, hopefully none too soon, I will definitely have to seek out some more! My palate is forever spoiled. Tomorrow, I need to find some fresh mozzerella for a caprese salad!

Insert witty saying here.

Corrado


quality posts: 130 Private Messages Corrado

Volunteer Moderator

kmeyersvt wrote:Tomorrow, I need to find some fresh mozzerella for a caprese salad!



...you mean once you've sobered up... :D

Corrado's Training Blog @ http://DrawnOutsideTheLinesOfReason.blogspot.com/
http://twitter.com/Corrado
**********************


It's not my fault that I love Gatzby! He's such a pretty, pretty "man."

kmeyersvt


quality posts: 0 Private Messages kmeyersvt
Corrado wrote:...you mean once you've sobered up... :D



What ever do you mean sobered up? You're the one who supplied TWO bottles of wine, I only opened the third one And it was my house, so I didn't have to drive.

I typed straight in my labrat report, didn't I? and I didn't haze you for not eating tomatoes. Oops, wait, now I have :D

Insert witty saying here.

Corrado


quality posts: 130 Private Messages Corrado

Volunteer Moderator

kmeyersvt wrote:What ever do you mean sobered up? You're the one who supplied TWO bottles of wine, I only opened the third one And it was my house, so I didn't have to drive.

I typed straight in my labrat report, didn't I? and I didn't haze you for not eating tomatoes. Oops, wait, now I have :D



It's a little known fact that the 'fruit' Eve ate in the Garden was not an apple, but a tomato, thereby making the tomato the fruit of evil.

Regardless, the BV was great drizzled over my tomatoless garlic toast and really did balance well with the B&J vanilla and Häagen-Dazs Strawberry topped with the fresh raspberry and strawberry. I actually wish I'd put MORE of it on, but I didn't want to seem TOO piggy.

Doubly sore that I missed out on ordering now.

One of the wines last night was the '06 Poizin. This was the first bottle I opened and I thought that once it had about 30 minutes exposure to the air, it was drinking very well without any appreciable alcohol aromas/flavors. It was a bit hot right out of the bottle, but that blew off quickly and the bottle disappeared rather quickly.

Corrado's Training Blog @ http://DrawnOutsideTheLinesOfReason.blogspot.com/
http://twitter.com/Corrado
**********************


It's not my fault that I love Gatzby! He's such a pretty, pretty "man."

cheron98


quality posts: 123 Private Messages cheron98

Rats, you've been packed.

I saw HitAnyKey42 on wine.woot! and clicked "I want one!"

unixrab


quality posts: 10 Private Messages unixrab

So... I'm looking forward to the BV, and mostly the descriptions of this certain sandwich. Fresh Tomato, Mozzarella, Basil with BV drizzled over it. My questions: What type bread, and are there any condiments on this classic besides the BV?

Thanks!

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Bags of Crap = 3 ------> woot 3.0 is DEAD!!!!
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

fairnymph


quality posts: 55 Private Messages fairnymph

Rats, thanks for the reports! Even though I missed the chance to buy some.

I have to say, I am seriously annoyed by everyone using BV on bruschetta or caprese = it's NOT traditional and IMO ruins the simple purity of both dishes, and/or is a sign that your basic ingredients (especially tomatoes) are mediocre.

If you have really great fresh tomatoes, using BV on them in these dishes overpowers them. I was taught this in cooking school in Tuscany and it makes perfect sense.

Why must people blaspheme classic dishes?

/snobby rant

My Cellar * Read my ramblings on LiveJournal.

79 wine.woots, 42 shirt.woots, 18 woots, 3 sellout.woots, 1 kids.woot

"I like my Sirah like I like my women: young, Petite and inky." - Thralow on CT

fairnymph


quality posts: 55 Private Messages fairnymph
unixrab wrote:So... I'm looking forward to the BV, and mostly the descriptions of this certain sandwich. Fresh Tomato, Mozzarella, Basil with BV drizzled over it. My questions: What type bread, and are there any condiments on this classic besides the BV?

Thanks!



Don't use BV on that sandwich unless you have lackluster tomatoes. However, if you are making it properly - with really great tomatoes and WITHOUT BV - then I suggest focaccia or ciabatta ideally. I'm a fan of the Whole Foods Market's ciabatta especially; they even make a frozen one that is excellent.

My Cellar * Read my ramblings on LiveJournal.

79 wine.woots, 42 shirt.woots, 18 woots, 3 sellout.woots, 1 kids.woot

"I like my Sirah like I like my women: young, Petite and inky." - Thralow on CT

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
unixrab wrote:So... I'm looking forward to the BV, and mostly the descriptions of this certain sandwich. Fresh Tomato, Mozzarella, Basil with BV drizzled over it. My questions: What type bread, and are there any condiments on this classic besides the BV?

Thanks!



I'd like a toasted ciabatta with that. I love ciabatta, its great

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
fairnymph wrote:Don't use BV on that sandwich unless you have lackluster tomatoes. However, if you are making it properly - with really great tomatoes and WITHOUT BV - then I suggest focaccia or ciabatta ideally. I'm a fan of the Whole Foods Market's ciabatta especially; they even make a frozen one that is excellent.



great minds and all, but the inclusion of the BV doesn't offend me, food is meant to be played with, classic recipes are great but sometimes a little extra is good also. Depending on how much balsamic is used, it shouldn't overpower a good ripe tomato, like a Brandywine or a German Red. Very powerful flavors in those.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

winefarm


quality posts: 7 Private Messages winefarm

Just wanted to report that my whining worked...just picked 4 small tomatoes. Will try for lunch today with the vinegar and basil. Yeah!!!

MaskedMarvel


quality posts: 11 Private Messages MaskedMarvel

Well, in the hub bub of changing some things at the bar, I've lost my Vinegar Martini recipe. If it turns up later, I'll post it, but here's the basic idea behind using high quality vinegars in the place of fruit sours in your cocktails....

It's about the acid. I remember doing this recipe because a chef friend of mine tried to make a dish that perfectly balanced the five tastes, and it was a challenge to try and use the vinegar to bring out a subtly balanced cocktail to pair with it.

The trick is not to "cheat." You want the acid to come from the vinegar, not a fruit.

Also - the vinegar is VERY potent. It's hard to get the right balance to keep it from overwhelming the rest of the ingredients.

OK - The best method of doing this for this martini was to make a balsamic and honey reduction. I think my ratio was 2:1 honey:vinegar. You want it syrupy, but not so reduced it won't flow.


    Rim a martini glass with fresh balsamic and sugar. Freeze.
    Take a fresh strawberry and muddle it violently (pulverize) in the bottom of a bar shaker.
    Shake 2oz quality tequila with 1oz Cointreau ( 2:1 ratio) vigorously in the shaker with ice and strain into the glass. There should be chunks of strawberries in there!
    Drip a few dashes of the balsamic syrup so it sinks to the bottom of the glass.
    Garnish with a fresh strawberry slice dipped in balsamic syrup and a long sprig of mint that curls around the inside of the glass.


That's about as close as I can remember it being for the strawberry balsamic margarita. Feel free to substitute salt for the sugar on the rim, which balanced the martini better but didn't enhance the strawberry as well, imho. Also - different vinegars give very different results, as does the strength of your reduction. Vary according to taste and your own experience. Making drinks is like making ribs - your own recipe is the best. Try switching out vodka for the tequila, an orange twist for the mint, whatever suits your fancy. Just enjoy it...

unixrab


quality posts: 10 Private Messages unixrab

Ouch...

Shipping info received... Scheduled Delivery: 07/21/2008 My vinegar is going to be on a truck for a looooooong time...and over a weekend. will the heat hurt it??

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Bags of Crap = 3 ------> woot 3.0 is DEAD!!!!
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

sanity


quality posts: 5 Private Messages sanity
MaskedMarvel wrote:Well, in the hub bub of changing some things at the bar, I've lost my Vinegar Martini recipe. If it turns up later, I'll post it, but here's the basic idea behind using high quality vinegars in the place of fruit sours in your cocktails....

It's about the acid. I remember doing this recipe because a chef friend of mine tried to make a dish that perfectly balanced the five tastes, and it was a challenge to try and use the vinegar to bring out a subtly balanced cocktail to pair with it.

The trick is not to "cheat." You want the acid to come from the vinegar, not a fruit.

.....snipped.....

That's about as close as I can remember it being for the strawberry balsamic margarita. Feel free to substitute salt for the sugar on the rim, which balanced the martini better but didn't enhance the strawberry as well, imho. Also - different vinegars give very different results, as does the strength of your reduction. Vary according to taste and your own experience. Making drinks is like making ribs - your own recipe is the best. Try switching out vodka for the tequila, an orange twist for the mint, whatever suits your fancy. Just enjoy it...



MM, thanks for the recipe, I look forward to testing it soon. A few years back I read a Q&A article In CHOW, about using herbs, spices and vegetable in mixed drinks. A very short article, but interesting for me since I don't care for most mixed drinks because of the sweetness.

The mag went kaput after just a few issues; now they have an active website, which you may already know about.

bhodilee


quality posts: 32 Private Messages bhodilee
unixrab wrote:Ouch...

Shipping info received... Scheduled Delivery: 07/21/2008 My vinegar is going to be on a truck for a looooooong time...and over a weekend. will the heat hurt it??



No, it's already spoiled. This isn't to say you should store it at 100+ but it's not gonna go bad if it's hot for a little while.

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it."

– George Bernard Shaw, author (1856-1950)

KurtBiz


quality posts: 0 Private Messages KurtBiz
unixrab wrote:So... I'm looking forward to the BV, and mostly the descriptions of this certain sandwich. Fresh Tomato, Mozzarella, Basil with BV drizzled over it. My questions: What type bread, and are there any condiments on this classic besides the BV?

Thanks!



unixrab - My favorite sandwich of all time is what you describe above, except add a fried chicken cutlet (or 2, if a 12"). The bread was some sort of firm sub roll that took a bit of effort when you bit into it. I got it once at a deli in Long Island and have been obsessed with it ever since. Like most others though, the Balsamic sold out while I was in my contemplation period =(

hijakk


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Mine arrived today - some vinegar had seeped out from behind the cork and got all over the inside of the box.. No harm done, though, I blame the altitude (in Boulder currently).

It's as thick as anything, and has a very nice taste, but I agree with jammele, in that it probably isn't one destined for icecream. It would definitely work will with veggies, or strawberries. It would complement any of the fancy salad greens you'd care to throw at it. The "herbal" comment he made rings true, and you do get more of a "wine" type flavor and smell than your standard decent-grade balsamic, almost a tannin quality. I'd classify this as a "savory" vinegar, instead of a "dessert vinegar".

Overall, I'm happy with my purchase, and am pretty sure that my step-mom will enjoy her early birthday present too.

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Corrado


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hijakk wrote:It's as thick as anything, and has a very nice taste, but I agree with jammele, in that it probably isn't one destined for icecream. It would definitely work will with veggies, or strawberries.



I thought it worked quite nicely on ice cream!

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elitemrp


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Ahhhhhh I want mine but UPS has been saying "Billing Information Received" for the past week.


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egoetz


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elitemrp wrote:Ahhhhhh I want mine but UPS has been saying "Billing Information Received" for the past week.



I've got the same problem :-(

unixrab


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KurtBiz wrote:unixrab - My favorite sandwich of all time is what you describe above, except add a fried chicken cutlet (or 2, if a 12"). The bread was some sort of firm sub roll that took a bit of effort when you bit into it. I got it once at a deli in Long Island and have been obsessed with it ever since. Like most others though, the Balsamic sold out while I was in my contemplation period =(



with BV or how about any condiments?

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Bags of Crap = 3 ------> woot 3.0 is DEAD!!!!
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unixrab


quality posts: 10 Private Messages unixrab

WHOA!!! UPS just dropped mine off!!! WD you pulled a fast one on me... I had prepared to wait until 7/21 like my UPS receipt said... but TODAY IS MY LUCKY DAY!! woohoo... the little ice packets were a nice touch too.. !

EDIT: It is good on vanilla ice cream.. .it's what you would expect from very tart fruit topping, but deeper.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Bags of Crap = 3 ------> woot 3.0 is DEAD!!!!
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